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 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 1:06 PM   
 By:   Doc Loch   (Member)

The song "Keep-a-Goin'" by Henry Gibson is actually based on a poem he recites during an appearance in an episode of The Dick Van Dyke Show years before Nashville.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 2:05 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

Thanks, Doc, and others for those excellent comments. I've never really been an Altman fan but I probably need to try harder because these films are highly regarded.

"The Company" was enjoyable but it didn't stand out for me as anything special.

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 6:09 PM   
 By:   Josh "Swashbuckler" Gizelt   (Member)

I feel I should mention that whilst Haven Hamilton is, for the most part, a caricature, during the events at the Parthenon he is one of the first to act, and he does so selflessly.

 
 Posted:   Jun 23, 2014 - 10:33 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Regie: Re: I've never really been an Altman fan but I probably need to try harder because these films are highly regarded.

I wrote above that it was my favorite Robert Altman film. What I failed to mention was that I'm not a huge Altman fan, so it's one of the few Altman movies that I have ever loved.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 23, 2014 - 11:25 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

Yes, Ron, I feel the same way about John Ford. I love some of his films but many others leave me completely cold.

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2014 - 9:35 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

In a way, for me at least, Altman's "Nashville" is like Woody Allen's "Annie Hall." Allen has made a lot of very good movies, and while I really like some of them (especially "Manhattan"), "Annie Hall" is the only one I truly love.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2014 - 10:07 AM   
 By:   bewlay   (Member)

Lucas and Spielberg brought life and fun back into the cinema!

Exactly. Films should be kept light, dumb & fun - they only serve as entertainment, after all.

Why complicate them with relevant insights into human nature or the meaning that we find in life's experiences.

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2014 - 10:32 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Lucas and Spielberg brought life and fun back into the cinema!

Exactly. Films should be kept light, dumb & fun - they only serve as entertainment, after all.

Why complicate them with relevant insights into human nature or the meaning that we find in life's experiences.


I assume you're just joking, right? But you forgot the smiley face.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2014 - 11:43 AM   
 By:   bewlay   (Member)

I assume you're just joking, right? But you forgot the smiley face.

I think was still trying to get my head around the previous poster's comment about hating interpersonal social study films of the 70s immediately followed by a statement claiming that George & Lucas & Steven Spielberg saved cinema.

Nashville is one of my favorite films from the 70s, & in general. I love it's meandering, melancholic nature, & I still listen frequently to the songs. Some of the lyrics are darkly humorous & reveal all kinds of contradictions, back stories, & insight into the characters who sing them. They were definitely not constructed as filler or as simple parodies of country music in order to ridicule the genre.

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2014 - 11:47 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

bewlay: And, as I mentioned, Criterion put together a great Blu-ray package on it which opened my eyes anew to its wonders.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2014 - 12:27 PM   
 By:   bewlay   (Member)

bewlay: And, as I mentioned, Criterion put together a great Blu-ray package on it which opened my eyes anew to its wonders.

Hi Ron, yes, I picked up the Criterion Blu-ray a while ago - I haven't had a chance to dip into the extra features yet but seeing the film again in this format was an experience. I never feel like the film is close to 3 hours when watching it, there are so many details, nuances & observations the whole way through that time is never an issue. The humor is prevalent throughout, yet often extremely understated, to the point where on the surface there doesn't appear to be anything of any relevance going on, just people doing things in a mundane fashion. Luis Bunuel's films are often that way - watch them casually, & there's nothing to see, yet pay close attention, & there is a wealth of information & sharp humor just underneath the surface.

That's what I like about Nashville - you have to really pay attention & invest yourself in to what the characters are doing & saying, especially in the smallest of details, as these things reveal much about the characters & the way they relate to their environment & other people in the film. It's intelligent, perceptive storytelling that is attuned to the rhythms of the character's lives & to the way people are in general.

Maybe I'm wrong, but I don't think audiences do 'meandering' or 'melancholic' in films any more. These qualities often get interpreted as 'boring' or 'overlong', & there is no patience to allow for a story to stretch out in a more relaxed manner, where a story is allowed to let in quieter moments which don't necessarily lead to a big reveal or plot point.

Of course if directed poorly this can lead to a boring film with nothing to say, but in Altman's case he was on target with Nashville & the results are brilliant.



 
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