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 Posted:   Jun 21, 2014 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   counterpoint   (Member)

This very good 1972 TV movie has a very short but wonderful and noble americana score by Goldsmith. Since the score is so brief, it would have to be coupled with another TV score by Goldsmith.

Here`s the full movie. You can hear Goldsmith`s main title at 7:00 and a short but memorable cue when James Earl Jones visits the Lincoln Memorial at 20:00.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYlipnnpWHg

 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2014 - 4:35 PM   
 By:   Krakatoa   (Member)

It would be great to have this with a re-recording of the Jerry Goldsmith "Waltons" scores and maybe room to add "The Homecoming"?


 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2014 - 5:08 PM   
 By:   patrick_runkle   (Member)

Funny, I was just watching "Pursuit" today and thinking that a Pursuit/The Man CD would be close to the greatest thing ever.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 4:16 AM   
 By:   counterpoint   (Member)

Funny, I was just watching "Pursuit" today and thinking that a Pursuit/The Man CD would be close to the greatest thing ever.


But isn`t PURSUIT MGM while THE MAN is Paramount? I guess THE MAN would have to be coupled with another Paramount score. Since I can`t think of another unreleased Goldsmith Paramount TV score, maybe a score by a different composer.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 5:58 AM   
 By:   patrick_runkle   (Member)


But isn`t PURSUIT MGM while THE MAN is Paramount? I guess THE MAN would have to be coupled with another Paramount score. Since I can`t think of another unreleased Goldsmith Paramount TV score, maybe a score by a different composer.


They're both "ABC Circle" films, whatever that means, and they're both produced by Lee Rich. (And they both have William Windom in them.) As "The Man" was produced for TV but released by Paramount, I'm not sure whether Paramount would really own the music. I was really just talking about how conceptually well they would fit together. The music's kind of in the same neighborhood, but distinct enough to be very satisfying. "Pursuit" has more of the "Last Run"/"Escape from PotA" funk vibe, where "The Man" has that stately Goldsmith Americana thing to it.

Although right now I can't recall any of the label people confirming it on this board, I have assumed that someone would have done a CD of both or either of these scores if the tapes were available, even in mono.

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 6:01 AM   
 By:   afn   (Member)

And I thought you wanted to tell us that Goldsmith was "The Man!"

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 6:30 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

Pursuit is one of the greatest unreleased Goldsmith scores, in his "mod"-style of the 70s.
Lukas Kendall said the masters are gone but perhaps a release is possible using the music stems?

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 11:52 AM   
 By:   SBD   (Member)

And I thought you wanted to tell us that Goldsmith was "The Man!"

As if we had to be told that.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 3:53 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

This very good 1972 TV movie has a very short but wonderful and noble americana score by Goldsmith. Since the score is so brief, it would have to be coupled with another TV score by Goldsmith.

Here`s the full movie. You can hear Goldsmith`s main title at 7:00 and a short but memorable cue when James Earl Jones visits the Lincoln Memorial at 20:00.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYlipnnpWHg


"The Man" was originally made for television, but released to theaters instead. Still no D.V.D. or Blu Ray release.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 4:21 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

THE MAN was based upon the Irving Wallace novel of the same name. Wallace’s novel was published in 1964. A bestseller, it won Paperback of the Year and sold over 5 million copies upon its release. Wallace was allowed unprecedented access to President John F. Kennedy’s White House to research his book. After Wallace wrote about 100 pages of the novel, Kennedy was assassinated, prompting the author to rewrite several passages to bring the death into perspective. Much of the long novel was edited out of the screen version, including story lines about President "Douglass Dillman’s" attempted impeachment, an assassination attempt on his life, and a child of his "passing" as white.

The novel underwent a complicated transition from page to screen. By December 1963, major film companies were considering buying the film rights, although at that time filmmakers were concerned about the future picture’s reception in Southern states. In March 1965, it was reported that Joint Venture Co., headed by Sammy Davis, Jr., Milton Greene and Irving Stein, had purchased the film rights to the novel and planned to shoot in early 1966 with Sidney Poitier as the star. Between 1966 and 1969, the novel’s film rights changed hands several times. After NBC-TV considered adapting the book into a television special with Poitier as a star, Promel Productions, Inc. bought the rights, followed by actor Eddie Fisher.

Argo International purchased the book rights in May 1968 and hired William Attaway to write the script. Jayjen Productions announced in June 1969 that it planned to produce a film version, to star Brock Peters and be written by Reginald Rose. However, Argo president Jack Lamont challenged Jayjen’s statement and stated that Arthur Hiller was set to direct Argo’s version. In the end, neither company was involved in the production.

Ultimately, Rod Serling would end up writing the screenplay, with Joseph Sargent directing. Lorimar Productions produced THE MAN for ABC-TV in late 1971, intending it to be broadcast on television as a planned two-part Movie of the Week. However, in March 1972, Paramount decided to release the film theatrically. Although a May 1972 Publishers Weekly article stated that the film was being moved from television to movie theaters because of the excellence of the adaptation, some believe that many television sponsors had shied away from the film’s controversial content.

THE MAN has never been released on any home video format. ABC originally held the copyright on the film, but sold it to Time-Life Films in 1981. And there the ownership trail goes cold.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2014 - 7:53 PM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)


But isn`t PURSUIT MGM while THE MAN is Paramount? I guess THE MAN would have to be coupled with another Paramount score. Since I can`t think of another unreleased Goldsmith Paramount TV score, maybe a score by a different composer.


They're both "ABC Circle" films, whatever that means


ABC Circle Films was the Alphabet Network's name for their in-house production company until the late '80s.

http://www.closinglogos.com/page/ABC+Circle+Films

 
 Posted:   Jun 23, 2014 - 10:49 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Very interesting post. How many times did JG visit the Lincoln Memorial in music? I count two.

The movie 'abc' intro looks suspiciously like Trumbull's slit-scan process, which was originally developed for 2001's stargate 'corridor of light' effect.

And I'm pretty sure that's Morgan Freeman in the Sure commercial that comes right after the Movie.

 
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