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 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

Its a Mad Mad Mad Mad World

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 1:27 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)


I never understood Rock's popularity. Yes he was a highly skilled and talented actor, but there's a vacuousness and ugliness in him that I find repugnant. He starred in several superb films but I always wished someone else were playing his part. Likewise, Paula Prentiss was always enchanting, blessed with real comic timing and dramatic chops, and I never understood why she did not become a BIG star with a long career.


Could you point out specific scenes in his film or TV roles where Hudson displays "vacuousness" and "ugliness"? I'm not a huge fan of him myself but I thought he had a wry comic wit and subtlety that I could "understand" many, many people loving. It didn't hurt that the man was handsome as hell (John Wayne said something to the effect of "Do you know what kind of career I could have had if I looked like him?") I don't care much for his soapy 1950s films so much as I do his role on McMillan and Wife but really, ugliness? You've expressed some downright bizarre opinions on this forum lately and that's fine, but as they tell us in school, "qualify your generalizations."


Nothing bizarre in my statements here. I deny the accusation. Do I go around posting that you have filled your posts on this forum with airheaded remarks?

I agree with your praise of him as an actor word for word. When I said ugly and vacuous I was trying, unsuccessfully, to define internal things in the person not to his appearance. You'll have to figure it out for yourself because I have other things to think about.

I admire the Douglas Sirk films especially. ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS, MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION, WRITTEN ON THE WIND, THE TARNISHED ANGELS are what cinema is all about. The films are also vital drama with some real wisdom in the storytelling. Much more than mere soaps, believe me. In comparison, McMILLAN AND WIFE is trivial.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 2:27 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)


Nothing bizarre in my statements here. I deny the accusation. Do I go around posting that you have filled your posts on this forum with airheaded remarks?


I was referring to things you've written recently. Things like "Spaghetti Westerns aren't westerns" and your long history of hating Daniel Craig.


I agree with your praise of him as an actor word for word. When I said ugly and vacuous I was trying, unsuccessfully, to define internal things in the person not to his appearance. You'll have to figure it out for yourself because I have other things to think about.


"Unsuccessfully" is right and since you are unable (or unwilling) to explain what it is specifically you dislike about him, then you are failing to qualify your generalizations. If the rest of your thoughts are anything like that, please deny me the content of those "other things" you have to think about, okay? I thank you in advance. wink


I admire the Douglas Sirk films especially. ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS, MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION, WRITTEN ON THE WIND, THE TARNISHED ANGELS are what cinema is all about. The films are also vital drama with some real wisdom in the storytelling. Much more than mere soaps, believe me. In comparison, McMILLAN AND WIFE is trivial.


It must be difficult to enjoy those films while enduring the "vacuousness" and "ugliness" of their leading man.

If you bother to reply, then that can be the last word. I gotta go watch some McMillan & Wife, Quantum of Solace, and maybe a Spaghetti (not-a)Western.

Apologies to the op for the hijack.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 2:28 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

My current two favorites are:

1. Trouble in Paradise (1932, Ernst Lubitsch) -- I love the beauty of the direction and set design -- and the cool ironies of the screenplay. The performances seem effortless.
2. The Palm Beach Story (1942, Preston Sturges) -- I love Colbert and McCrea in this film. The Ale and Quail Hunting Club sequences always reduce me to a giggling mess.

Others:

His Girl Friday
Blithe Spirit
Hail the Conquering Hero
The Miracle of Morgan's Creek
Twentieth Century
Bringing Up Baby -- perhaps the funniest film I've ever seen
The Party
A Shot in the Dark
My Man Godfrey


John, wonderful list - I'm not sure about "The Party", though. Not the Sellers film!? Was "Twentieth Century" screwball?

I forgot the Lubitsch "Trouble in Paradise" - a classic of the sophisticated screwball for which this great director was renowned. Where, oh where is that kind of elegance and class today?

I wouldn't consider "Dinner at Eight" (Cukor) as screwball. But it has some very funny scenes with Marie Dressler. Remember the famous last lines of the film between Dressler and Harlow...

"I was reading a book the other day (astounded looked from Dressler, who stops in her tracks)....a nutty kind of a book. It said that one day machines are going to take over every profession".

(Dressler looks behind Harlow and her shapely behind in a silk gown), "Well, my dear, that's something you need never worry about!"

Though it doesn't seem funny written down, she delivered that line with wit and irony!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 2:30 PM   
 By:   John McMasters   (Member)

Also, how could I forget! Topper!

"The Party" -- yes, the Blake Edwards film with Sellers. Some of the funniest slapstick ever. Technically, maybe not screwball -- but in my mind screwball and slapstick sometimes merge.

"Twentieth Century" -- the 1934 Hawks screwball comedy set on a train with John Barrymore and Carol Lombard.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twentieth_Century_%28film%29

It was later turned into one of the funniest Broadway musicals ever: "On the Twentieth Century""

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Twentieth_Century

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 2:38 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

"The Party" isn't screwball, if you look at the Wiki link I provided earlier of screwball characteristics (and heaven knows Wiki is not always to be relied upon).

It is a fairly specific genre of comedy and certainly influenced many later comedies from the 1950's, especially "Some Like it Hot". And, yes, I forgot about Hawks's "Twentieth Century" - though I didn't find it funny last time I saw it.

Ironic isn't it; these films were forged in the crucible of The Great Depression!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 3:10 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

i'll say one thing for you, JP, you got style!!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 3:23 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

More put-downs and snips from Jim Phelps. We can say what we want about films and filmmakers within bounds of decency and good manners, but constantly attacking another member of the forum is inappropriate. You're out of line. If you don't understand my posts it's your problem. Why don't you grow up?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 10:19 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

More put-downs and snips from Jim Phelps. We can say what we want about films and filmmakers within bounds of decency and good manners, but constantly attacking another member of the forum is inappropriate. You're out of line. If you don't understand my posts it's your problem. Why don't you grow up?

Really, can't people behave in a civilized manner - especially on a specialist site like this one.

I've left 2 or 3 serious music messageboards because of trolling and unpleasantness; the last one a feral from New York who, because of his 'personality' problems (oh that's right; you've got to actually HAVE a personality to have a personality problem!) went after myself and 2 or 3 others (who, incredibly, put up with his rubbish). These people show their insecurities and make fools of themselves, but their need to recover and/or maintain self-esteem means they willingly attack others hoping to make them feel small. Legions of psychologists and academics are busy studying this comparatively recent phenomenon. I've alluded to this in my recent thread on these pages, entitled "The Dark Tetrad".

Please don't write anything here if you haven't got anything positive to contribute to the discussions!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2014 - 12:09 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)


anyway Regie, moving swiftly on, as a later example, can i have How to murder your wife?!
plenty of male-female rapport, and some role reversal and marriage challenging, etc.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2014 - 3:24 AM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

anyway Regie, moving swiftly on, as a later example, can i have How to murder your wife?!
plenty of male-female rapport, and some role reversal and marriage challenging, etc.


I cannot remember the film, but I do know I've seen it years ago. It will probably have been influenced by the screwball genre from the 30's/40's, but I'm not prepared to say it's NOT screwball.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2014 - 5:00 AM   
 By:   tarasis   (Member)

Also, how could I forget! Topper!


Indeed, I didn't mean to either.

 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2014 - 2:09 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

THE MAD MISS MANTON

Barbara Stanwyck gets to be comic and so does Henry Fonda. What a team!

 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2014 - 4:39 PM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

Gung Ho

I really thoughyt I was the only one on the planet who had seen this movie!! Let alone loved it....it's an absolute gem....wish I could track down the TV series too...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2014 - 9:43 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO RICHARD W-I sympathize with you all the way, that is why I am on vacation from this board for a while. you could not say words more true.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 5:23 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Of films I've recently seen and enjoyed, only "Horrible Bosses" seems to incorporate some of the characteristics of a screwball comedy, but I'd never have thought of it as such. What does anyone else think?

Here's a link that's just occurred to me - "Horrible Bosses" has Julie Bowen in a relatively minor role. She also plays Claire Dunphy in "Modern Family". Claire's maiden name is Pritchard, and her dad is called Jay Pritchard. Jay in the show is struggling to come to terms with his son's gay marriage. Pritchard and Richard sound like each other. The word that describes a pair or more of words that sound alike is homophone. Fascinating where language can lead us!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

thats interesting tg. must check it out.

 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 7:15 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Gung Ho

I really thoughyt I was the only one on the planet who had seen this movie!! Let alone loved it....it's an absolute gem....wish I could track down the TV series too...




 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 8:59 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

'The More the Merrier' 1943 by Director George Stevens. It's my favorite. Here's a brief description of what ensues in the clip below:
Jean Arthur rents a spare room during the WWII housing shortage to Charles Coburn, (Mr. Dingle). This is their first night and morning together as Landlord / Renter. She has devised an extremely intricate time-plan for the mornings to get them OUT and on time. Watch and enjoy.


 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2014 - 1:48 AM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

Montana Dave, I love this movie too and had forgotten about it. "Damn the torpedoes; full steam ahead". Love the script!!

And Joel McCrea was quite wonderful in it!!!

 
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