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 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 6:27 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

NEVER! (If I can help it.) Listening to dramatic music inspires ideas and imagery to me. Inevitably these images will differ from the actual movie. Therefore, when I see the movie, the music may seem "wrong." The film score has been spoiled for me. My logic is similar to that of composers who do not want to hear a temp score and do not want to read an unfilmed script. The whole idea of film music is for sound and image to combine with a seemingly inevitable rightness. Film and film music belong together. A very few scores may have material that can stand on its own, but they are the exception to the rule.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 13, 2014 - 7:49 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

NEVER! (If I can help it.) Listening to dramatic music inspires ideas and imagery to me. Inevitably these images will differ from the actual movie. Therefore, when I see the movie, the music may seem "wrong." The film score has been spoiled for me. My logic is similar to that of composers who do not want to hear a temp score and do not want to read an unfilmed script. The whole idea of film music is for sound and image to combine with a seemingly inevitable rightness. Film and film music belong together. A very few scores may have material that can stand on its own, but they are the exception to the rule.

My own thoughts exactly. I dislike listening to film music if I haven’t seen the film and have only very rarely done that. The primary purpose of a film score is of course to serve the film and inevitably a score will contain all kinds of instrumental detail and effects which mean nothing outside of the context of the film. Of course one can derive some satisfaction from listening to a score without any knowledge of the film but an appreciation and understanding of the music is aided hugely if one is fully aware of how the music works within the image. If I didn’t have an interest in film, I doubt that I would listen to much film music at all.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 13, 2014 - 8:26 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

Well I have bought the scores of some Italian movies (Morricone ect.) where I'll never see the film, but for the most part, never. I'm a film fan before a film music fan, & it was always; see the film, love the score, buy the score album. I found out the hard way that blind buying just doesn't work for me.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 13, 2014 - 2:55 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

NEVER! (If I can help it.) Listening to dramatic music inspires ideas and imagery to me. Inevitably these images will differ from the actual movie. Therefore, when I see the movie, the music may seem "wrong." The film score has been spoiled for me. My logic is similar to that of composers who do not want to hear a temp score and do not want to read an unfilmed script. The whole idea of film music is for sound and image to combine with a seemingly inevitable rightness. Film and film music belong together. A very few scores may have material that can stand on its own, but they are the exception to the rule.

My own thoughts exactly. I dislike listening to film music if I haven’t seen the film and have only very rarely done that. The primary purpose of a film score is of course to serve the film and inevitably a score will contain all kinds of instrumental detail and effects which mean nothing outside of the context of the film. Of course one can derive some satisfaction from listening to a score without any knowledge of the film but an appreciation and understanding of the music is aided hugely if one is fully aware of how the music works within the image. If I didn’t have an interest in film, I doubt that I would listen to much film music at all.


I respectfully disagree with both of you. i don't care what a score's "primary purpose" is. I care about how it sounds spinning on my turntable while I'm drinking a glass of wine. If I had passed up the rare soundtracks I have waiting to see the film, half of my accumulation would be gone. There is too much good music out there and too little time. I'm not going to avoid music because I haven't seen the film for which it was written.

But I'm more than happy to perpetuate your viewpoint, because it increases my odds of finding obscure titles. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 15, 2014 - 9:29 AM   
 By:   Les Jepson   (Member)

I like to know the programme behind any sort of programme music, be it ballets, tone poems, et cetera, to better understand the aims of the music. In the case of film music I usually find the best way to do this is to see the film before listening to the isolated score. This is essential for certain composers -- Alex North, for instance. It should go without saying (although I will say it) that I speak only for myself.

 
 Posted:   Aug 15, 2014 - 3:49 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Well I will have to disagree with Rozsaphile and Doug Raynes on this one. In fact, I bought and listened to all of Rozsa's soundtrack LPs before seeing the movie. Moreover I reveled in his evocative score for SODOM AND GOMORRAH decades before finally seeing the movie on Laserdisc; the film did little to heighten my enjoyment of the score, and I try not to recall the film in listening to the music.

Come to think of it, I remember enjoying LP after LP in the sixties... Mancini's HATARI!, CHARADE, THE PINK PANTHER, North's SPARTACUS and CLEOPATRA, Newman's HOW THE WEST WAS WON and THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD, Bernstein's THE GREAT ESCAPE and HAWAII, Goldsmith's THE BLUE MAX and THE SAND PEBBLES... and it was always the music compelled me to see the films (SPARTACUS, HAWAII and GREATEST STORY I didn't see until many years later).

I don't feel I have to reference any film track-by-track to enjoy a good score. If the score is an engaging one on its own, then it is worth listening to regardless of the merits of the film; if the film is a good one, all the better. If the score does not resonate with me, then perhaps viewing the film might change my mind enough to give it a second listen, which rarely happens.

 
 Posted:   Aug 15, 2014 - 7:29 PM   
 By:   ST-321   (Member)



Beyond that, I approach each and every soundtrack as an independent concept album. The movie couldn't even exist, for all I care. I'm probably alone in that approach, but it works for me.


Not at all. I have many soundtracks for movies I've never seen. Even for ones I that I do end up seeing I would rather hear the music first - that way you can appreciate it for what it is on its own without images and dialog from the film coming back to mind.

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2014 - 4:44 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

I have never seen a huge number of movies of which I own fantastic soundtracks

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2014 - 4:44 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

Dp

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2014 - 4:45 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

Tp

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2014 - 4:54 AM   
 By:   Trent Easton Navarro   (Member)

For me it's more about the composer than about the film. I love Carter Burwell's music but you really think I'm gonna watch Breaking Dawn? And have seen some of the horrible films Brian Tyler has scored in his career? Or Marco Beltrami?

 
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