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 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 2:09 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

Seriously.

He's actually ruined other composers' music for me. I just can't enjoy Goldsmith, Morricone and many others as much anymore since discovering this guy, because all I can think when listening to them is, "I wish John Scott had taken a crack at this instead. It'd be so much richer!"

Seriously. His music just BRISTLES with inspiration. He's probably the best orchestrator since Ravel or Respighi. His music just shimmers with genius, and boy can he write. A damn. THEME!

And while a lot of composers feel like they run out of steam or inspiration later in their careers, his music only kept getting better. He's been brilliant with themes from the get-go,but his symphonic mastery really began to mature into something truly exceptional around the mid-80's onward.

Most everyone else feels like burgers and fries next to this guy. I just can't get enough John Scott!

Yea I know, let the hate mail for the Goldsmith comments begin... But seriously. Let's hear more love for the genius that is John Scott!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 2:19 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

Because he's English and played with the Beatles!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 2:45 PM   
 By:   Rnelson   (Member)

I've long sung the praises of John Scott. It's too bad that he is so under-represented on CD. The first thing of his that caught my ear back in the '80s was Greystoke. From there I bought anything of his that I could get my hands on. I wish there would be a re-release of his Cousteau scores. I have only half of them.

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 2:49 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

"I wish John Scott had taken a crack at this instead. It'd be so much richer!"

I like alittle of Scott's music, but my overwhelming reaction to this topic is that line reminds me of what the constipated father says to his diarrheatic son in PORTNOY'S COMPLAINT: "Hey, let me in there so I can have a crack at that bowl!"

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 3:22 PM   
 By:   thestat   (Member)

Because he is not. He can do a few melodies but as a composer he lacks skills in dramatics as well as narrative continuation.

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

He's not better than Williams, Goldsmith, or Horner, but he could tackle bigger and better projects and do just as well. He could certainly write the pants off of the contemporary composers getting the assignments today.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   hyperdanny   (Member)

He's probably the best orchestrator since Ravel or Respighi. His music just shimmers with genius

just "probably", huh? Just in case somebody could ever think that this extravagant elegy for a decent composer is a little bit out of proportion...

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 3:48 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

He's probably the best orchestrator since Ravel or Respighi.

There's plenty of well-orchestrated music after the 1930s. Ravel's & Respighi's music is known for its orchestral color, but there has also been a lot music with highly detailed orchestrations by composes who have used more advanced techniques of composition beyond the realms of tonality and romanticism. Sample Roberto Gerhard's 1965 'Concerto for Orchestra', for just one example.

I think what you are implying is that John Scott has continued to write music in the early 20th-century vein which you apparently love the most.

(I actually prefer Scott's pre-1980s music, especially between 1967 & 1972)

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 3:54 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

but his symphonic mastery really began to mature into something truly exceptional around the mid-80's onward.


I disagree about that time period, though. Much as I like King Kong Lives, nothing Scott has done after 1972 has surpassed Antony and Cleopatra.

Don't get me wrong, because I love John Scott's music as well and collect almost every soundtrack of his.

[as a side-note, I recall FSM member Dana Wilcox who claims that listening to the music of John Scott induces narcolepsy in him. smile ]

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 3:56 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Exceptional and reliable composer.

Loved Billy Two Hats. And Final Countdown. And Deadly Pursuit. And with the white hair and clipped beard, he even looks like a composer should!

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 4:39 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

[as a side-note, I recall FSM member Dana Wilcox who claims that listening to the music of John Scott induces narcolepsy in him. smile ]

looking at the topic title, also induces Tourette Syndrome.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 4:52 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

I disagree about that time period, though. Much as I like King Kong Lives, nothing Scott has done after 1972 has surpassed Antony and Cleopatra.

While I agree that Antony and Cleopatra is my favorite score of his, in that the finest moments are utterly MAGNIFICENT, I also don't think very highly of the action/suspense cues from this score and often skip them.

Same goes for PEOPLE THAT TIME FORGOT and THE FINAL COUNTDOWN, which have outstanding themes but suspense/action writing that feels a little shrill and messy to me.

By comparison, the action music in King Kong Lives, The North Star, the few action cues from The Last Viceroy, etc. is where his action chops really began to become tremendous in my book.

You all must, must, MUST hear his unreleased score to the mini-series Harlem from 1986, which might be one of his single most unsung masterworks:

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=112392&forumID=1&archive=0

One of the things I love about this guy is that he has several "modes" of writing that he calls upon for different projects, all of which are clearly his voice: His impressionistic musical portraits of the natural world (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Cousteau scores, Jules Verne Adventures, Greystoke), his distinctly "British" lyrical side (The Shooting Party, Shergar, The Scarlet Tunic), his more "Traditional Hollywood" action/adventure/thriller scores (King Kong Lives, Man on Fire, The North Star, Far From Home, Shogun Mayada, Shoot to Kill etc.), Folk-influenced Americana sound (Walking Thunder, Winter People, Time of the Wolf) and finally, his big ravishing Classically-rich period epics, all of which bear the wonderful influence of Rimsky-Korsakov but clearly embody his own distinct voice: Antony and Cleopatra, Becoming Colette, King of the Wind, Harem. Such rich, rich music.

I don't know what it is about his writing, it just speaks to me so so much. The musicianship is incredible and wonderfully rich, ornate, adventurous and full of unrequited longing and awe.

The fact that he orchestrates every note himself alludes to his mastery and control of his craft.

Sure, there are a few duds too, like the unlistenable Inseminoid or his rejected A Prayer for the Dying (Conti's used score is one of that composer's absolutely most inspired in my opinion), but given his vast output, I really do believe this man to have one of the most singularly compelling, musically-satisfying, richly crafted voices in music - For film or otherwise.

I'm sad to see a lot of responses here are more passive aggressive jabs at his work rather than celebrations of his victories, of which there are so many.

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 5:41 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

I'm sad to see a lot of responses here are more passive aggressive jabs at his work rather than celebrations of his victories, of which there are so many.

there's only a few posts so far, and half agree with your praise. I wouldnt get too down by the few people who dont agree with your assessment. The subdued responses might be a reaction to your unbridled enthusiasm and rhetoric. Which reminds me, to answer your topic title question:
Because he ate his Wheaties?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 5:45 PM   
 By:   Loverozsa   (Member)

Why are you so f*cking ignorant to start a thread honoring this fine man and his music in such a vulgar way?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2015 - 6:13 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

Why are you so f*cking ignorant to start a thread honoring this fine man and his music in such a vulgar way?

Vulgar!?!? I'm genuinely enthusiastic, my friend! I think you mistake my tone. Forgive any misconceptions about my intent with this thread.

All the same, I've gone ahead and changed the title of the thread to ensure my intent not be mistaken for "Vulgar" again...

 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2015 - 5:28 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

Why are you so f*cking ignorant to start a thread honoring this fine man and his music in such a vulgar way?

Vulgar!?!? I'm genuinely enthusiastic, my friend!


it was obvious you used the expletive as a positive qualifier. Loverozsa was probably joking since he used the same language. Then again, maybe he was serious and figured it would get his point across.
On the actual negative side, completely changing the title really ruins my "wheaties" joke. mad

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2016 - 8:52 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

I readily agree that John Scott is a brilliant composer, one of my favorites!! It is deplorable that he was not addressed to score first class productions.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2016 - 9:09 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

I readily agree that John Scott is a brilliant composer, one of my favorites!! It is deplorable that he was not addressed to score first class productions.
I totally agree ! Just listen to his main title theme from THE NORTH STAR a very minor film.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2016 - 9:26 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

Glad to see this resurrected. I might be meeting the Maestro himself soon...

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2016 - 10:11 PM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

I only have John Scott's The Deceivers. But it's a tremendous listen that I would recommend to anyone, with some really great Indian flourishes throughout it. I was lucky enough to find it dead cheap in a second-hand CD store in Canada. Still one of my luckiest blind buys, as I've never seen the film.

 
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