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 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 11:31 AM   
 By:   KHashmi316   (Member)

Given the scoring/composing JC did for Halloween and The Fog, I'm pretty sure that he had contributed a lot to The Thing.
Nevertheless, only EM gets credit on the 1982 OST (this includes the 1991 VSD CD re-release).

Within the last 10 years or so, a few "complete" (2-CD) albums have also appeared. E.g.:
https://www.discogs.com/Ennio-Morricone-John-Carpenter-The-Thing-Complete-Score/release/2742211

You can listen to "The Thing (Complete Score) " here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgiSXRoG2tQ

Included in the Complete Score is perhaps my favorite The Thing music cue: the opening credit sequence. This is "00:00 A Ship of Some Kind" in the YouTube video above.

My question is who -- EM or JC -- composed this all-synth piece? There are several more similar all-synth cues used throughout the movie. But there are some that are pure orchestral (is this EM?).

I'm tempted to believe JC did the all-synth cues, while EM did the orchestral cues.
For example, listen to The Fog here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKGzUxH9GyQ

Not sure why only EM gets the credit in the movie credits or original 1982/91 The Thing OST releases.

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 12:21 PM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)


Not sure why only EM gets the credit in the movie credits or original 1982/91 The Thing OST releases.


Iirc, Carpenter had a big say as far as what he wanted on the soundtrack, and even though parts of it do sound as though they could have come off the JC films before, let's keep in mind that he was at least partly dissatisfied with what Morricone gave him.

Still, it's hard for me to imagine JC not taking credit (there's just no dollar sense to it, plus Carpenter made darn sure he got credit for much of his earlier movies), so the score probably is overwhelmingly maestro Morricone's.

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 12:43 PM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

Everything on the official soundtrack album is Morricone.

If I'm correct, Morricone didn't score THE THING 'to picture' but basically read the script, saw the rough edit and then wrote and recorded music in the style of library music that Carpenter could cut the film to.

According to the documentaries on the special edition Blu-Ray, Morricone first wrote the orchestral music.

Carpenter liked it but it wasn't entirely what he'd hoped for, so he went back to Morricone, played some of his previous scores like ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK to Morricone and asked, "Can you also write something like this?"

So Morricone went away with those Carpenter recordings and did a second round of writing and recording to create the electronic music. It's in the style of Carpenter, but it's Morricone.

Then after Morricone delivered this second wave of music, Carpenter and Howarth still had some scenes that they felt nothing in Morricone's music worked for, so they wrote some additional music of their own. This music was not included on the official soundtrack album.

My belief is all the music Morricone wrote is on the album, about 50 minutes worth from memory. So anything you hear in the film that's also on the album is Morricone. And anything you hear in the film that is not on the album will be Carpenter/Howarth. I don't think it's all that much.

Watch the documentaries on the special edition Blu-Ray for more.

Cheers

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 1:28 PM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)

Everything on the official soundtrack album is Morricone.

If I'm correct, Morricone didn't score THE THING 'to picture' but basically read the script, saw the rough edit and then wrote and recorded music in the style of library music that Carpenter could cut the film to.

According to the documentaries on the special edition Blu-Ray, Morricone first wrote the orchestral music.

Carpenter liked it but it wasn't entirely what he'd hoped for, so he went back to Morricone, played some of his previous scores like ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK to Morricone and asked, "Can you also write something like this?"

So Morricone went away with those Carpenter recordings and did a second round of writing and recording to create the electronic music. It's in the style of Carpenter, but it's Morricone.

Then after Morricone delivered this second wave of music, Carpenter and Howarth still had some scenes that they felt nothing in Morricone's music worked for, so they wrote some additional music of their own. This music was not included on the official soundtrack album.

My belief is all the music Morricone wrote is on the album, about 50 minutes worth from memory. So anything you hear in the film that's also on the album is Morricone. And anything you hear in the film that is not on the album will be Carpenter/Howarth. I don't think it's all that much.

Watch the documentaries on the special edition Blu-Ray for more.

Cheers


Great post, and now I'm convinced the blu ray is essential (the film is one of my favorite horrors, right up there with the Shining, Pet Sematary, Psycho, Exorcist).

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 1:35 PM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)

Also on the blu ray is one of the best commentaries I've ever heard, that touches on the music (as well as Goldsmith's possible involvement!), by producer Stuart Cohen (moderated by Michael felsher). For a producer, the ground he covers & knowledge of the production....highly impressive. It's the most recent blu edition on Screen Factory.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 1:42 PM   
 By:   bryantburnette   (Member)

Scream Factory

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 1:42 PM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)

Also on the blu ray is one of the best commentaries I've ever heard, that touches on the music (as well as Goldsmith's possible involvement!), by producer Stuart Cohen (moderated by Michael felsher). For a producer, the ground he covers & knowledge of the production....highly impressive. It's the most recent blu edition on Screen Factory.

I didn't know Jerry was considered (well, hard to blame them, he was on fire then). I see the blu ray collector's edition...is that the one I want?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 1:45 PM   
 By:   Roy Donga   (Member)

BSX released a terrific recording of the Alan Howarth/John Carpenter cues.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 1:46 PM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)

Yep, interesting story and get that blu WA!!!
I've been a fan since birth of this film & that edition is the best. I was really floored by that commentary...I don't know if it was even listed on the back lol!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   KHashmi316   (Member)

The Thing is the only EM recording I own.
I have never really liked EM's music, so I've always been confused about this score . And I do like it quite a lot, especially the synth stuff. I'm glad JC had so much influence on the final output.
This reminds me of the situation producers of Alien (1979) ran into with J. Goldsmith. Recall (from various DVD documentaries ) that JG wanted a much more romantic score. As great as a composer as JG is, I'm glad the producers made the final call on the cues used. Take that opening credit sequence of Alien -- the movie version is very effective. JG's original romantic cue (found on 2-CD set) is simply not scary/tense.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)

Had to add - are we separated at birth?

You appreciate Rozsa (all that great Golden Age music) AND John Carpenter??
Rare birds we are smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 1:49 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Also on the blu ray is one of the best commentaries I've ever heard, that touches on the music (as well as Goldsmith's possible involvement!), by producer Stuart Cohen (moderated by Michael felsher). For a producer, the ground he covers & knowledge of the production....highly impressive. It's the most recent blu edition on Screen Factory.

I didn't know Jerry was considered (well, hard to blame them, he was on fire then). I see the blu ray collector's edition...is that the one I want?


Yep! The one from Scream Factory is the one you want.

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 2:00 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I didn't know Jerry was considered (well, hard to blame them, he was on fire then). I see the blu ray collector's edition...is that the one I want?

See this lengthy thread on films Goldsmith was attached to:
http://www.jerrygoldsmithonline.com/forum/viewthread.php?tid=3985

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 2:01 PM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)



Yep! The one from Scream Factory is the one you want.


THANKS!

Had to add - are we separated at birth?

You appreciate Rozsa (all that great Golden Age music) AND John Carpenter??
Rare birds we are smile


Jerry's Boys From Brazil was the second album I ever owned as a little kid (Elton John's Greatest Hits was the first).

I have to thank Yavar especially for the guidance concerning maestro Jerry, that man knows good music!

And yes, as much as JG's stature is progressively growing in my eyes, my favorites are the real old guys: Bernard, Miklos, Alfred.

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 2:10 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I have to thank Yavar especially for the guidance concerning maestro Jerry, that man knows good music!
And yes, as much as JG's stature is progressively growing in my eyes, my favorites are the real old guys: Bernard, Miklos, Alfred.


You're welcome, of course...I think Jerry can still catch up to those three (maybe Ennio too). You still have yet to get The Artist Who Did Not Want to Paint, Seconds, Lonely Are the Brave, A Patch of Blue, and some of his other most profound works. smile

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 2:15 PM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)



Yep! The one from Scream Factory is the one you want.


THANKS!

Had to add - are we separated at birth?

You appreciate Rozsa (all that great Golden Age music) AND John Carpenter??
Rare birds we are smile


Jerry's Boys From Brazil was the second album I ever owned as a little kid (Elton John's Greatest Hits was the first).

I have to thank Yavar especially for the guidance concerning maestro Jerry, that man knows good music!

And yes, as much as JG's stature is progressively growing in my eyes, my favorites are the real old guys: Bernard, Miklos, Alfred.


I won't bore ya too much, but I fumbled my way onto the classics too via various ways way back in the 80's. I actually was looking at my Jerry's last night for a curve ball to throw ya....then I got distracted lol. Got 'am all, so I know about that Jerry-diction we get!
He is the best career to traverse....I still hear things pop up I never heard in the prior 20 listenings on certain scores. And it's worse when you love EVERY era, 60s to 10's...prepare to be broke! I won't even start on Ennio, although this is his thread, hmmm...

-Sean

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 2:17 PM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)

I have to thank Yavar especially for the guidance concerning maestro Jerry, that man knows good music!
And yes, as much as JG's stature is progressively growing in my eyes, my favorites are the real old guys: Bernard, Miklos, Alfred.


You're welcome, of course...I think Jerry can still catch up to those three (maybe Ennio too). You still have yet to get The Artist Who Did Not Want to Paint, Seconds, Lonely Are the Brave, A Patch of Blue, and some of his other most profound works. smile

Yavar


Oh sure, even if all I had to listen to were the Omens, Red Pony, and QBVII his star would keep rising for me. smile

Patch of Blue I put off because of the jazz element (I could be mistaken)...that's one genre of music I really have to be in the mood for (though I am first to point out some incredible composers from that genre).

I have no idea why I haven't grabbed Gathering of Eagles or Inchon yet. Definitely in my future.

As far as maestro Morricone...I'm on board. I personally think Hateful Eight is a meisterwerk. They didn't just "give" him that Academy Award.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 2:20 PM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)

He's right about PATCH, brilliant and just one quick jazz source cue, rest is chamber orchestra heaven...

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 2:21 PM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)

He's right about PATCH, brilliant and just one quick jazz source cue, rest is chamber orchestra heaven...

REALLY! You just made me 500% more interested, thank you!

 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2018 - 2:31 PM   
 By:   Adm Naismith   (Member)

BSX released a terrific recording of the Alan Howarth/John Carpenter cues.

that BSX album is most of/the entire score re-recorded on synthesizer. The Carpenter/Howarth material will sound closer to the movie tracks than the Morriconne, obv.

 
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