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 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 1:08 AM   
 By:   jsmiley108   (Member)

This is probably going to be a fairly unique post but it might inspire some interesting answers/comments...

In 1999 I was unfortunate enough to contract a rather debilitating virus that laid me low for a few weeks. During this time I was feverish and I think sometimes delirious. I also remember during this time having the score of Horner's Titanic running through my head and me hating it, wishing it to stop doing my head in. I think since this time, I have never listened to those CDs (I have both of them) in full again.

Has anyone had an experience like this that has permanently changed your listening experiences?

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 1:44 AM   
 By:   Wedge   (Member)

There was a brief period where I was using snippets of film music as ringtones and phone alerts and the like. I quickly came to realize that I was conditioning my brain to associate this music, which I loved, with something utterly trivial -- and forging unwelcome Pavlovian connections in the process. I didn't want to wind up distracted by the impulse to reach for my phone every time I heard the "History of the Ring" theme while watching LORD OF THE RINGS, for example. I've stuck with boring old-fashioned ringtones ever since...

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 1:52 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Yes.

Back in 2011 or so, I was diagnosed with chronic tinnitus in my left ear. Every waking hour, the sound was there. Like when you turned on one of those old fat tube TVs, that's the sound. Just multiplied by 10. As the years went by, I managed to overcome the psychological stress to a reasonable extent.

But then in October last year, the sound suddenly DOUBLED, and it's now at a completely intolerable level that I can no longer deal with.

Suffice to say, all of this has had a huge consequence for how I listen to music. I'm no longer drawn to big, orchestral action scores, but prefer the calm and textural. Or the electronic. I can no longer listen to music intently alone, but have to have it on in the background while I do other things (like sitting on a PC) -- as I multitask, I fool the brain (the creator of the sound) to divert less attention to it.

But beyond this very biological event, I would have to say that there's a personal taste evolution going on too, that also has had some bearing on how and what I listen to. I did a thread on this awhile back, but can't for the sake of me remember what I called it.

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 1:53 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I can't recall anything quite so fundamental as your experience ... perhaps the closest being: as a teenager, I worked in a branch of W.H.Smith during 1974-6 ... in the popular vinyl/tape music department during the last year ... and the constant bombardment of Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody (released Autumn 75) almost drove me nutty ... certainly I can't hear more than a few seconds now without squirming. Conversely, Abba's Fernando - released a few months later - was such a welcome sound that, even to this day, I still like it.

Actual improvement to listening enjoyment is far more straightforward: better quality hi-fi. Simple, easy ... but not inexpensive. Coincidentally, we've just listened to Ennio Morricone's adaption of his score to Un tranquillo posto di campagna (A Quiet Place in the Country) (1968), a 34+ minute suite of melody and crazy sounds. In the old days on my everyday CD player set-up it was just noise ... now it sounds like a group of guys having a ball ... it's still bonkers but at least it sounds like musical instruments (mostly, at any rate).

And, if not exactly a recommendation, at least a friend's enthusiasm. I hadn't written Shostakovich off, more I simply didn't own that much and rarely played what I did own. But said enthusiasm pushed me towards listening more and now both my wife and I rate a lot of his works very highly, to the extent of attending live concerts.

Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 2:00 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Hmm....I realize now that my former post didn't actually answer your question.

What you're talking about is things that are read into the music, after some extra-musical thing has been imprinted on it early on. I actually did a thread on this too awhile back, but again -- I can't remember what I called it, and the search engine isn't working.

Best example I can think of, is when -- back in my teenage years -- I listened to 'Best Of' albums by Santana and Electric Light Orchestra on rotation while I read gripping Stephen King stories. As a consequence, every time I listened to those albums later on, they would have definite Stephen King associations; if not narratively, then emotionally.

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 2:13 AM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

Yes.

Back in 2011 or so, I was diagnosed with chronic tinnitus in my left ear. Every waking hour, the sound was there. Like when you turned on one of those old fat tube TVs, that's the sound. Just multiplied by 10. As the years went by, I managed to overcome the psychological stress to a reasonable extent.

But then in October last year, the sound suddenly DOUBLED, and it's now at a completely intolerable level that I can no longer deal with.

Suffice to say, all of this has had a huge consequence for how I listen to music. I'm no longer drawn to big, orchestral action scores, but prefer the calm and textural. Or the electronic. I can no longer listen to music intently alone, but have to have it on in the background while I do other things (like sitting on a PC) -- as I multitask, I fool the brain (the creator of the sound) to divide less attention to it.

But beyond this very biological event, I would have to say that there's a personal taste evolution going on too, that also has has some bearing on how and what I listen to. I did a thread on this awhile back, but can't for the sake of me remember what I called it.


I also suffer from motherf***ing tinnitus. I remember the thread on it, I think you started it Thor...? Do remember the title of that thread? I haven't done the simple search using the word tinnitus, that might work. Mobile right now.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 2:20 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Yeah, we've had a couple of threads about it:

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=81915&forumID=7&archive=0

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=96644&forumID=1&archive=0

Statistically, there should be several people on this board beyond us two who suffer from chronic tinnitus. But to various extent, obviously. Everyone thinks their own is the "worst", but it's hard to measure such things. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 2:23 AM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

When I was a child, we would take long trips in the hot car, with my parents smoking cigarettes, which used to make me feel quite ill, to say the least. They would put on their 8-track tapes of Jim Croce or Neil Diamond. To this day, when I hear that music, I feel nauseous all over again. I'm sure they're good artists, but that association with that car sick feeling just comes rushing back. frown No kidding.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 2:37 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

If this is now down to illness<->music, this obviously happens in other areas too. I have a friend who ate noodles while he was sick, then became more sick and now can't eat noodles anymore. It's a fairly common, associative, psychosomatic phenomenon.

The ol' Ludwig van/CLOCKWORK ORANGE test, innit?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 2:44 AM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

If this is now down to illness<->music, this obviously happens in other areas too. I have a friend who ate noodles while he was sick, then became more sick and now can't eat noodles anymore. It's a fairly common, associative, psychosomatic phenomenon.

The ol' Ludwig van/CLOCKWORK ORANGE test, innit?


Yeah, for me it's only a few artists, thank goodness. I don't know what I would think of them if my parents had been a little more considerate and cracked a window by a few inches. wink

Regarding tinnitus: I have it as well, but I don't know how bad my case is, as I've never experienced anyone else's tinnitus. Plus, I've had it so long, and it's been pretty consistent in intensity, that I have learned to handle it.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 3:04 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

The answer would be no, but when I'm going through something bad, like someone I like or love dies, or a breakup (& this stuff happens to all of us at one time or another), I make a point not to listen to my favourite music as I don't want my brain to link feeling bad to listening to that music.

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 4:50 AM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)

Cool topic! I've spent a great portion of my life studying music, and I noticed over the years that as I learned more about music (including composition, orchestration, arranging, etc.) along with intent appreciation, I got way more out of music as a whole. One can delight or be stricken by things in certain compositions that might fly over the head or even irritate the casual listener (not that there's anything wrong with casual listening, far from it).

But that's just me, music is of course there for everybody to enjoy for whatever reasons suit them.

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 6:34 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Wax build up. I'm not kidding.

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 6:38 AM   
 By:   WagnerAlmighty   (Member)

Wax build up. I'm not kidding.'

LOL! +1000

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 7:06 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Yes.

On 19 May 2000 I received a CDR with the score from Chill Factor by Hans Zimmer and John Powell. While I played it, two small girls got raped and killed in the woods just a couple of hundred yards away from me. Since then, I can't really play that music anymore, as it reminds me too much of that day. Particularly this theme:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlX68p9kM9g&index=20&list=PLohYzz4btpaQ4ZV7UXA-vz27IWFrgFJFG

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 7:50 AM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

Well, I guess any hopes the OP had of this being a serious thread have flown out the window.

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 8:19 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Well, I guess any hopes the OP had of this being a serious thread have flown out the window.

Triggered much? Lighten up Francis. roll eyes And I was being serious.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 8:28 AM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

And I was being serious.

Then why did you put a winky eye?

What makes you think I was referring to you anyway? Paranoid much? roll eyes (And what does "triggered" even mean?)

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 8:34 AM   
 By:   acathla   (Member)

Yes.

On 19 May 2000 I received a CDR with the score from Chill Factor by Hans Zimmer and John Powell. While I played it, two small girls got raped and killed in the woods just a couple of hundred yards away from me. Since then, I can't really play that music anymore, as it reminds me too much of that day. Particularly this theme:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlX68p9kM9g&index=20&list=PLohYzz4btpaQ4ZV7UXA-vz27IWFrgFJFG


Are you from Norway as well?
What a horrible time that was :O

I dont't have any really bad experiences like these, BUT back in the days I happened to put a song on repeat (very slow, calm and beautiful songs) thinking it would be nice sleeping with this on.
But all 3 times/songs was totally ruined the next day! They didn't sound the same at all. They just sounded really odd and very off...I dont know how to explain it better but even to this day, 18 years later, these songs sound weird to me. And I hate it cause they were really beautiful songs, lol!

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2018 - 8:34 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Paranoid much? roll eyes

Yes! wink

 
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