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 Posted:   Aug 4, 2018 - 5:12 AM   
 By:   jsmiley108   (Member)

I have recently been editing my James Bond music in iTunes (is that a bit old school lol?)

A few questions about Dr. No as far as where it was recorded and with whom etc.

I have read the chapter from Jon Burlingame's book and it sheds some light but not all.

Initially I am referring to the 2003 EMI/Capitol release.

It seem to me that all (?) of the tracks on this CD were recorded in Jamaica. Can anyone verify this?

I have managed to ascertain that Track 12, Kingston Calypso was sung by Diana Coupland with Ernest Ranglin on Electric Guitar and Track 14, Under The Mango Tree is sung by Monty Norman himself.

However, depending on which recording you are listening to, Audio Bongo is either performed by Burt Rhodes And Eric Rodgers (2013 EMI/Capitol), Monty Norman (the 50th Anniversary Harkit edition) or the John Barry Orchestra (2017 Remaster).

It seems that Tarantula was recorded back in England, but when and conducted by whom?

Any assistance with who did what where?

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2018 - 7:32 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Ignoring the controversy re: composition of the James Bond Theme, I think it's safe to say that that iconic title theme was recorded in London - under John Barry's baton! I believe that's well documented.

For the score (under-score) I would expect London to have been the recording location, too, with the orchestra conducted by Eric Rogers (as Eric Rodgers) - probably for some/all of the instrumental versions of the songs and maybe the vocals for Under(neath) the Mango Tree, too ... Diana Coupland and Monty Norman for the album versions). I can't recall reading/hearing that any of this music was recorded on location.

As for the source tracks Jump Up and the opening piece Kingston Calypso credited to Byron Lee & The Dragonaires ... as you say, these were recordings by Ernest Ranglin. Given his high profile music status there I should imagine those recordings were laid down locally but I have no evidence of this.

I point you towards the Special Issue #4 of Movie Classics (Cinema Retro special edition) which covers just about everything to do with Dr. No (1962) ... pp72-75 cover the music. As one of the articles states: The album is interesting in that 12 of the 18 tracks do not feature in the movie. In another article: The album was recorded at CTS Studios in London and orchestrated by Eric Rogers. Burt Rhodes is credited as the orchestrator for the film score.

That said, I'm not convinced everything stated in these articles is correct.

You can ignore the references re: Harkit ... they're only correct when they agree with other sources smile Certainly John Barry had no other involvement beyond the James Bond Theme.

For my music database (not iTunes) I do not bother with recording location ... I have enough trouble in finding and/or verifying composers and recording artists!

Good luck.
Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2018 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   Mike F   (Member)

Might be some information here.

http://jamesbondradio.com/dr-no-soundtrack-review-music-bond-podcast-004-005/

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2018 - 7:29 PM   
 By:   jsmiley108   (Member)

Yes Mitch, thanks for correcting that part that the Barry arrangement would have been recorded in UK because he was brought on board right at the end.

What about the other 17 tracks. It seems that the stuff involving Byron Lee and the Dragonaires were recorded in Jamaica. But did Mr and Mrs Norman also record their vocals in Jamaica or was that re-done back in UK?

And who conducted all the instrumental/orchestral stuff?

I'm sure someone out there must know this...

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2018 - 9:09 PM   
 By:   Tango Urilla   (Member)

I have recently been editing my James Bond music in iTunes (is that a bit old school lol?)

I have nothing to add to the topic, but if arranging your music in iTunes is old school now, boy do I feel ancient.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2018 - 9:33 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

Yes Mitch, thanks for correcting that part that the Barry arrangement would have been recorded in UK because he was brought on board right at the end.

What about the other 17 tracks. It seems that the stuff involving Byron Lee and the Dragonaires were recorded in Jamaica. But did Mr and Mrs Norman also record their vocals in Jamaica or was that re-done back in UK?

And who conducted all the instrumental/orchestral stuff?

I'm sure someone out there must know this...


I seriously doubt any music from the album was recorded in Jamaica except for the Byron Lee material. Monty Norman was flown there with his then-wife Diana Coupland specifically to enjoy a holiday and get the overall feel of the picture's location, including of course soaking up the music that was then popular in the island. Norman then returned to England and finished composing the score there (he claims he jotted down a few ideas in Jamaica, but it never went as far as recording anything there).

Regarding the score, the recording sessions for the orchestral background music took place in june 25-26th, 1962. Burt Rhodes certainly claimed he was there to supervise the whole thing, which might have included conducting the music, but this is something I don't think can be confirmed by anyone right now except by Monty Norman himself.

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2018 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

dp

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2018 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

The James Bond Theme was recorded at CTS Bayswater the version for the single was recorded at Abbey Road a few weeks latter.

The rest of the score was apparently recorded at CTS though I'm sure I read somewhere that it was recorded at Denham

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2018 - 8:38 AM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

I have recently been editing my James Bond music in iTunes (is that a bit old school lol?)

A few questions about Dr. No as far as where it was recorded and with whom etc.

I have read the chapter from Jon Burlingame's book and it sheds some light but not all.

Initially I am referring to the 2003 EMI/Capitol release.

It seem to me that all (?) of the tracks on this CD were recorded in Jamaica. Can anyone verify this?

I have managed to ascertain that Track 12, Kingston Calypso was sung by Diana Coupland with Ernest Ranglin on Electric Guitar and Track 14, Under The Mango Tree is sung by Monty Norman himself.

However, depending on which recording you are listening to, Audio Bongo is either performed by Burt Rhodes And Eric Rodgers (2013 EMI/Capitol), Monty Norman (the 50th Anniversary Harkit edition) or the John Barry Orchestra (2017 Remaster).

It seems that Tarantula was recorded back in England, but when and conducted by whom?

Any assistance with who did what where?



I've always been puzzled about the two James Bond themes. On the CD, track one is "James Bond Theme" which we all know. Track 17 is titled "THE James Bond theme" which certainly lacks the punch of the first.
Does anyone know the story behind track 17?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2018 - 9:38 AM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)



I've always been puzzled about the two James Bond themes. On the CD, track one is "James Bond Theme" which we all know. Track 17 is titled "THE James Bond theme" which certainly lacks the punch of the first.
Does anyone know the story behind track 17?


Track 17 is basically a different version of 'Dr. No's Fantasy', and the reason it was labeled as "The James Bond Theme" was because Monty Norman's first try at writing the Bond theme was precisely 'Dr. No's Fantasy', which the producers and director thought it wasn't good enough to represent the character of James Bond. Days went by, and the producers called John Barry to fix the mess, and the rest as they say is history! (As a side note, it is worth mentioning that the guitar riff from the definitive Bond theme was taken from a song Norman had written for an abandoned musical, a riff Norman suggested Barry to use as the core of the theme).

During the trial between The Sunday Times and Norman, the latter claimed that the people in charge at United Artists music messed with all the track names for the movie's LP release, clearly confirming that Norman did not choose - at least according to him - the track names that finally came out with the soundtrack album.

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2018 - 10:10 AM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)



I've always been puzzled about the two James Bond themes. On the CD, track one is "James Bond Theme" which we all know. Track 17 is titled "THE James Bond theme" which certainly lacks the punch of the first.
Does anyone know the story behind track 17?


Track 17 is basically a different version of 'Dr. No's Fantasy', and the reason it was labeled as "The James Bond Theme" was because Monty Norman's first try at writing the Bond theme was precisely 'Dr. No's Fantasy', which the producers and director thought it wasn't good enough to represent the character of James Bond. Days went by, and the producers called John Barry to fix the mess, and the rest as they say is history! (As a side note, it is worth mentioning that the guitar riff from the definitive Bond theme was taken from a song Norman had written for an abandoned musical, a riff Norman suggested Barry to use as the core of the theme).

During the trial between The Sunday Times and Norman, the latter claimed that the people in charge at United Artists music messed with all the track names for the movie's LP release, clearly confirming that Norman did not choose - at least according to him - the track names that finally came out with the soundtrack album.

Alex


Thanks Alex for your input. Norman's original song was titled "Bad Sign, Good Sign". The original key is G minor which Barry transposed to E minor. Norman indicated that it should have a "sitar Indian feel".
Jon Burlingame's book "The Music Of James Bond" has the original sheet music on page 13.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2018 - 2:18 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)



Thanks Alex for your input. Norman's original song was titled "Bad Sign, Good Sign". The original key is G minor which Barry transposed to E minor. Norman indicated that it should have a "sitar Indian feel".
Jon Burlingame's book "The Music Of James Bond" has the original sheet music on page 13.


You are welcome. It is also worth mentioning that Norman was filmed during a fairly recent interview digging out what he called the original manuscript of the Bond theme out of a drawer in his house. If i'm not mistaken, it is the same one that Burlingame published in his book: a single line melody, written in pencil.

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2018 - 7:10 PM   
 By:   henry   (Member)



Thanks Alex for your input. Norman's original song was titled "Bad Sign, Good Sign". The original key is G minor which Barry transposed to E minor. Norman indicated that it should have a "sitar Indian feel".
Jon Burlingame's book "The Music Of James Bond" has the original sheet music on page 13.


You are welcome. It is also worth mentioning that Norman was filmed during a fairly recent interview digging out what he called the original manuscript of the Bond theme out of a drawer in his house. If i'm not mistaken, it is the same one that Burlingame published in his book: a single line melody, written in pencil.

Alex


Alex, I'm glad you're back, I always learn stuff from you!smile

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2018 - 8:23 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)



Alex, I'm glad you're back, I always learn stuff from you!smile


I'm flattered that I can be of help to you, Henry!
Not to change the subject, but believe it or not, I attended a John Williams concert last april in Chicago, and I know he's one of your favorite composers. The whole program was absolutely amazing, and i'm blessed to have been able to be there smile.

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2018 - 9:29 PM   
 By:   jsmiley108   (Member)

What about the rising and falling semitones and the gun barrel at the start - are they Norman or Barry?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2018 - 4:45 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

What about the rising and falling semitones and the gun barrel at the start - are they Norman or Barry?


Formally, they must be Norman. Otherwise John Barry would be credited on every film.

Informally, come on, really? big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2018 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

What about the rising and falling semitones and the gun barrel at the start - are they Norman or Barry?


Formally, they must be Norman. Otherwise John Barry would be credited on every film.

Informally, come on, really? big grin



 
 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2018 - 2:19 PM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

What about the rising and falling semitones and the gun barrel at the start - are they Norman or Barry?


Formally, they must be Norman. Otherwise John Barry would be credited on every film.

Informally, come on, really? big grin





The rising and falling of semitones starting on the 5th of the chord ( B in the case of the Bond theme which is in E minor) is a common arranging device. It was used in Artie Shaw's theme "Nightmare" back in the 40's.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2018 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   henry   (Member)



Alex, I'm glad you're back, I always learn stuff from you!smile


I'm flattered that I can be of help to you, Henry!
Not to change the subject, but believe it or not, I attended a John Williams concert last april in Chicago, and I know he's one of your favorite composers. The whole program was absolutely amazing, and i'm blessed to have been able to be there smile.

Alex


I'm glad you had a good time Alex! Yes, Williams is one of my favorites along with Conti, Kamen and Barry. BTW, I just got Barry's KING KONG, he was such a great composer! You know Barry won five Oscars, impressive.smile

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2018 - 3:18 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)



I'm glad you had a good time Alex! Yes, Williams is one of my favorites along with Conti, Kamen and Barry. BTW, I just got Barry's KING KONG, he was such a great composer! You know Barry won five Oscars, impressive.smile


I find it even more impressive that he didn't win any for his Bond scores wink.

Alex

 
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