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 Posted:   Aug 26, 2018 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   Adam Krysinski   (Member)

CD (digipack) - BackLot Music USA - October 12, 2018.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2018 - 6:58 PM   
 By:   Sampo   (Member)

This will make a good companion disc to George Kallis' Gagarin-First In Space.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 2:49 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

Looking forward to both film and score!

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 6:09 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

It's great because we have no idea what this will sound like. C'mon, kid!

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 6:18 AM   
 By:   Adam Krysinski   (Member)

We have an idea !

Variety.com - "I'm getting away from jazz and old-fashioned orchestral sounds and experimenting with electronic music"

https://twitter.com/Variety/status/957730571643310081

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 7:05 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Oh, god damn it.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 7:50 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I won't name any names, but I'm tired of composers that show promise with orchestral works or orchestra-samples works, who later on want to piss around in electronics creating synthscapes and other skippable material that only makes one or two people here on the board happy.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 8:05 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

Looking forward to the film.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

If the electronics are good, fine. But when I hear a composer talk about electronics, I just think it's going to be yet another score that'll sound exactly like a second-rate Hans Zimmer bitch.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 11:28 AM   
 By:   davefg   (Member)

Oh, god damn it.

How is an electronic score going to fit into a film about one of the most historic moments of the 20th century? Pity Horner isn't around, or Arnold etc asked, to give this film the right gravitas.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 11:31 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Oh, god damn it.

How is an electronic score going to fit into a film about one of the most historic moments of the 20th century? Pity Horner isn't around, or Arnold etc asked, to give this film the right gravitas.


The wording here is problematic, though I understand what you mean all the same. I thought for sure that, with Hurwitz's prior work and the time period in which the film is set, we'd be getting a straight-up orchestral score. Still want to hear it, but less optimistic after that quote.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 12:06 PM   
 By:   Dylan   (Member)

Having recently seen the trailer, "First Man" is also going for a shaky handheld visual look, which for me is a complete reversal of expectations after the stationary look of both "Whiplash" and "La La Land" - given this, I'm not surprised that the score is also going against expectations by being electronic rather than taking a symphonic Americana approach.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 12:39 PM   
 By:   Mike S   (Member)

Oh, god damn it.

How is an electronic score going to fit into a film about one of the most historic moments of the 20th century? Pity Horner isn't around, or Arnold etc asked, to give this film the right gravitas.


You mean a moment that involved, very specifically and very crucially, electronics? wink

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 6:39 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

I won't name any names, but I'm tired of composers that show promise with orchestral works or orchestra-samples works, who later on want to piss around in electronics creating synthscapes and other skippable material that only makes one or two people here on the board happy.

What's wrong with throwing Benjamin Wallfisch under the bus in this instance?

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 6:53 PM   
 By:   ST-321   (Member)

This will make a good companion disc to George Kallis' Gagarin-First In Space.

I hope it is as good. First In Space is wonderful.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2018 - 8:41 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Electronic scores take many forms. Regardless, I'm not really sure how an electronic score (if this is indeed that) is inappropriate for a film about space in 1969.

 
 Posted:   Aug 28, 2018 - 12:01 AM   
 By:   Adam Krysinski   (Member)

Still better story than Junkie XS.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 28, 2018 - 8:50 AM   
 By:   Mephariel   (Member)

Electronic scores take many forms. Regardless, I'm not really sure how an electronic score (if this is indeed that) is inappropriate for a film about space in 1969.

I too am disappointed that this isn't an orchestral score, but I can't be the only one tired of this argument.

Why can't a composer use electronics as a creative decision to add futuristic foreshadowing?

For some reason, the anachronism argument is only applies when moving backwards and never forward. For example, Silvestri's score for Ready Player One is highly praised despite Silvestri not attempting to stimulate any futuristic sound or composition. If no one told you the score was created for a video game movie, you would never know. But yet people accepted his "old fashioned" approached. If that is acceptable, than we should accept Hurwitz's "Steampunk" approach.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 28, 2018 - 8:51 AM   
 By:   Mephariel   (Member)

I won't name any names, but I'm tired of composers that show promise with orchestral works or orchestra-samples works, who later on want to piss around in electronics creating synthscapes and other skippable material that only makes one or two people here on the board happy.

I would think a composer's job is not to make anyone here happy.

If a composer is thinking about the people here, he or she isn't doing a good job.

 
 Posted:   Aug 28, 2018 - 9:07 AM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

For some reason, the anachronism argument is only applies when moving backwards and never forward.

This is a good point! And of course, there was no music in 100 BC that sounded anything like "Spartacus," and 80,000 years ago, Sarde's orchestral "Quest for Fire" is no more valid than Silvestri's synthesized "Clan of the Cave Bear" (both were tens of thousands of years in the future).

Meanwhile, synthesizers were very much around in 1969, so that in itself is not an anachronism for "First Man." I'm assuming the synths used in this score will not be of that era, but why do we have to be so literal, anyway? They will surely be using the sorts of camera moves that only newer film technology allows. Is that also a no-no?

 
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