Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Oct 14, 2018 - 11:21 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I sometimes prefer the knockoff albums to the original scores. Obvious examples would be Roland Shaw, Ray Martin, and Sounds Orchestral.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 14, 2018 - 11:34 AM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

You have way too much time on your hands.....

So do you, my friend big grin.

Alex

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2018 - 1:31 AM   
 By:   Tom Maguire   (Member)


Since you mentioned Diamonds Are Forever, I believe it is one of Barry's greatest scores, especially in the expanded version. Set in Las Vegas, it lends itself to Barry's brassy style. I listen to it more than any other John Barry score.


Diamonds gets my vote for the greastest Bond song ever. Best music, best lyrics, best performance and best recording. There's such an elegant mature wisdom about the relationship between men and women in the song. I think its unique persepective about relationships comes from the fact that it's a song sung by a women, about men but written by a *gay* man. I think about the lyric "men are mere mortals who are not worth going to your grave for" all the time.

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2018 - 8:56 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

mos def.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2018 - 9:29 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

As much as I like the DAF song, my vote for the greatest song must go to 'We Have All The Time In The World'. It is the quintessential love song, and the fact that it was Louis Armstrong's last recording just adds to the magic of the piece.

Alex

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2018 - 10:38 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

Diamonds gets my vote for the greatest Bond song ever. Best music, best lyrics, best performance and best recording. There's such an elegant mature wisdom about the relationship between men and women in the song. I think its unique perspective about relationships comes from the fact that it's a song sung by a women, about men but written by a *gay* man. I think about the lyric "men are mere mortals who are not worth going to your grave for" all the time.


While I would question the "wisdom" or ethics of the lyric, DAF is not meant to portray a good girl or give real advice, so that's beside the point. The song itself is a stunner, insanely good, and I think that's because the earth-shaking execution lived up to and even exceeded the solid composition.

 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2018 - 10:56 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

I sometimes prefer the knockoff albums to the original scores. Obvious examples would be Roland Shaw, Ray Martin, and Sounds Orchestral.



Compilation CD:


Roland Shaw is the greatest of all possible cover artists for the Barry Bonds. He delivered the Barry, and always with that extra something that made the Shaw worth having even if you also had the original. [I'm not sure I'd say that for Shaw's takes on OHMSS and DAF, but everything that came before was amazing and wonderful.]

The Ray Martin Bond sound is very Austin Powers, downright comedic as heard today. For the Barry fan, Martin is not in the same league as Shaw, and he's not even playing the same sport. The Shaw-Martin divide between serious and comedic is much greater than the analogous dichotomy between Connery and Moore films.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 4:39 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

The Ray Martin Bond sound is very Austin Powers, downright comedic as heard today. For the Barry fan, Martin is not in the same league as Shaw, and he's not even playing the same sport. The Shaw-Martin divide between serious and comedic is much greater than the analogous dichotomy between Connery and Moore films.

Have you heard Ray Martin's non-Bond albums? I assume that "for the Barry fan," maybe not, but I'm asking. I don't consider myself a Barry fan per se, but more generally a fan of both the spy genre and space-age bachelor pad music. Ray Martin contributed to both of those genres. With Bond, I think Martin's picking up on the comedic subtext in the Connery-era Bond films. I consider Barry as the creator of the spy music template, but I feel that many composers did it much better than he did, including Edwin Astley, Laurie Johnson, Jerry Goldsmith, Lalo Schifrin, and probably others I'm forgetting. In my world, Ray Martin is just as important as John Barry.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 5:11 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

In my world, Ray Martin is just as important as John Barry.


A world that might be interesting to visit, but with respect I wouldn't want to live there smile

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 5:14 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

In my world, Ray Martin is just as important as John Barry.

A world that might be interesting to visit, but with respect I wouldn't want to live there smile


If your world is mid-century modernism, the right music is important.

To me, John Barry's greatest musical and stylistic contribution was inspiring all these other great albums and scores, both the Bond knockoffs and the musical spy genre in general.

However, I do truly love Barry's Bond scores through Diamonds, and two other scores (Ipcress and the Knack).

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 5:19 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

In my world, Ray Martin is just as important as John Barry.

A world that might be interesting to visit, but with respect I wouldn't want to live there smile


If your world is mid-century modernism, the right music is important.



I picture you sitting in an egg chair, surrounded by Saul Bass posters.

And listening to dodgy music...

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 5:20 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)


However, I do truly love Barry's Bond scores through Diamonds, and two other scores (Ipcress and the Knack).



And now you've added that, I have to say that I said almost the same words to two other FSMers only last night. See the meeting of minds thread overleaf.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 5:20 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I picture you sitting in an egg chair, surrounded by Saul Bass posters.

I have neither, but you're not too far off.

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 5:23 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

I'm just thrilled to learn about this Ray Martin world that I didn't know existed. And I say that sincerely, without irony or snark, because I care about worlds in this corner of the universe. And I want that egg chair!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 5:44 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Trademark Ray Martin device:

On a minor 7th chord, you have three female vocalists singing oohs or ahs. Top voice is singing the fifth, the middle voice is singing the minor third, and bottom voice is singing the ninth, creating a half-step grind between the ninth and minor third.

You hear this and you know it's Ray Martin.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 5:52 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I'm just thrilled to learn about this Ray Martin world that I didn't know existed. And I say that sincerely, without irony or snark, because I care about worlds in this corner of the universe. And I want that egg chair!

Bringing the conversation full circle to your avatar, do you think Barry ever wrote anything as good as "The Cage" or "Man Trap?"

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 6:26 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

The cover versions of JB007 themes, generally, have been discussed on a number of occasions and here are some threads from nearly 10 years ago:

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=56967&forumID=1&archive=0&pageID=1&r=598#bottom

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=58087&forumID=1&archive=0

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=60810&forumID=1&archive=0

I don't seek out/buy as many as I used to though in the intervening years I have bought a Carl Davis/Philharmonia Orchestra release Bond for Orchestra (2012) and also the CD release of Eric Winstone Plays 007/Supersonic Sounds ... finding that some of the earlier no-name/false-name releases are from this JB007 album.

As for Ray Martin, I've not acquired a CD release to replace the old scratchy vinyl LP~CDr transfers I made many years ago ... his interpretations don't work for me. Away from these JB007 recordings I do have a few others (1952-56) but none carry vocal accompaniment (that I can recall) with Carousel Waltz (Richard Rodgers) being a 1956 Top-20 hit here in the U.K. Maybe his most famous tune (in my collection) is the 1953 recording of Marching Strings because for many years it was used for the BBC school quiz show: Top of the Form.

I've got 14 recordings of Ray Martin conducting for the vocalist Lee Lawrence (1955-57) but I doubt anyone is interested in these smile

But these compositions/recordings are a generation or more away from the JB007 themes of the 1960s.

Mitch

 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2018 - 6:45 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

Bringing the conversation full circle to your avatar, do you think Barry ever wrote anything as good as "The Cage" or "Man Trap?"


Well, I won't deny my passion for Star Trek music.


But you can't compare the music portfolios of Star Trek and James Bond, they're great in such different ways. Where they approach the same space, in areas like fight music and love themes, I wouldn't dream of subordinating either one of them in a contest. They're above that.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2018 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.