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 Posted:   Oct 10, 2018 - 11:39 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

I'm sure it must have been noted elsewhere, but the "theme" from Somewhere in Time was not written by John Barry. It is the eighteenth variation from Rachmaninoff's The Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. Rozsa also used it in The Story of Three Loves. I have loved it since I heard it in that film. It is probably my favorite piece of music. I found out it was from a classical piece, and I bought it. Then I bought more Rachmaninoff. That lead me to more classical music. It still brings tears to my eyes after sixty-five years.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2018 - 12:10 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

I see your 7 dwarves as first trip to cinema, mcGann, and raise you Mary Poppins!


Yes, Mary Poppins was my first visit to the cinema with mum and dad. And the third, as it happens, with a Man From Uncle film inbetween.

I still have the three LPs that I was brought up listening to with my dad and older brother (me being the last survivor): The Alamo, YOLT and OHMSS.


The jungle book was my first "soundtrack"
And probably 3rd cinema film after mary p and Bambi.
In the following years mum n dad took me to all the big family films, from Where eagles dare, Blue max, Dr No, true grit, battle of britain, bridge at remargen, Big Jake. All of those scores remind me of those times.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2018 - 12:25 PM   
 By:   Jens   (Member)

I still remember the exact piece of music I was listening to when I learned that my father had had a stroke. It wasn't fatal right away, but it damaged his brain and was the beginning of the end.

Unfortunately, the cue was "Open the Gates" from Goldsmith's Star Trek V, one of my favorite action pieces ever.

I still, of course, adore the piece, even though listening to almost inevitably it brings back that memory.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2018 - 1:13 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

mgh, the classical Rhapsody from SOMEWHERE IN TIME is different/separate from the theme that John Barry wrote for it.
I think most people here are referring to JB's theme. I know I am.

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2018 - 1:38 PM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I'm sure it must have been noted elsewhere, but the "theme" from Somewhere in Time was not written by John Barry. It is the eighteenth variation from Rachmaninoff's The Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. Rozsa also used it in The Story of Three Loves. I have loved it since I heard it in that film. It is probably my favorite piece of music. I found out it was from a classical piece, and I bought it. Then I bought more Rachmaninoff. That lead me to more classical music. It still brings tears to my eyes after sixty-five years.

This being a film music site ... I'm sure those who mentioned John Barry's theme to Somewhere in Time (1980) did mean just that ... John Barry's elegiac, glorious, unforgettable and oh-so-romantic theme ...

... not the wonderful, beautiful, ever-lasting melody which Rachmaninov created as the XVIII variation in his Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op.43.

As much as I am a fan of Rachmaninov (one of my all-time favourite composers), I've never taken that much to this work, always preferring his four piano concerti, symphonies, preludes, sonatas, et al.

For my parents, my mother still being with us, she likes the song stylists of the 1950s and 1960s and I've created numerous CDrs for her from my library of such artists. Added to which I've recently purchased CDs of Lee Lawrence and BBC's Sing Something Simple (... do your own research!) ... I always sought to avoid the latter when broadcast on a Sunday afternoon.

I follow my father's tastes with the likes of Frank Sinatra, Marty Robbins, Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong ... though have yet to purchase anything by Muggsy Spanier. For his funeral I chose a Sinatra recording and hopefully he would have approved of my choice. Whereas his 1969 recording of My Way is/was a popular choice for funerals I knew my father was not a fan, much preferring the younger Sinatra who sang with the band as if he was a component rather than using them as (most singers) backing ... and opted for his 1950 recording of Nevertheless (I'm in Love with You).

My parents had a few LPs/singles in my youth and I recall Sunday mornings being the time ... I never did like the OSTs for Oklahoma! (1955) or South Pacific (1958) ... until I bought them myself many years later!!!

When I started buying LPs, one of the first was John Barry's OHMSS (1969) and I recall him asking me to play side 2 another time! Compare this to when I borrowed the 2LP set of John Williams' Star Wars (1977) from a friend ... after side 1 my parents demanded No more!

Mitch

 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2018 - 1:59 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

They clearly had great taste mitch, altho anyone guilty of anything remotely anti S*** w*** on this forum wouldve got them burned as witches probably!!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 15, 2018 - 9:30 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Both of my parents are still alive and in their 60s, so a bit early for postmortem remembrances.

But if I were to remember them through music at some point, it wouldn't be through my own film music (a genre to which they're mostly indifferent or casually interested at best), but rather the music THEY liked to listen to. Like Cliff Richard or something for my mom, and....I don't know....the Budapest Quartet for my dad.

 
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