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 Posted:   Apr 30, 2004 - 2:46 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Stephen Hague is a famous pop producer, the man responsible for the sounds of bands like Pet Shop Boys and New Order.

In 1987, the year he wrote and produced possibly THE best pop song ever - New Order's "True Faith", he also scored the teen movie Some Kind Of Wonderful, along with John Musser.

The CD is chock full o' songs, and no score, but I would like to know what this score sounds like.

Any info? Is it typically 80s pop sounding, like Faltermeyer et al?

 
 Posted:   May 3, 2004 - 1:45 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Well, guys??

 
 
 Posted:   May 3, 2004 - 3:34 PM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

The rule is: if I post, you reply; if you post I reply.

Let's face it, unlike anyone else here, we both live in the 80s! big grin

 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2007 - 12:30 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

I finally saw this film. Quite good teen flick by John Hughes from 1987, I can very much understand why it became a hit. Far better than another similar film from 1984 that I also saw recently, Tuff Turf. Better dialogue, better story and so on...

The music. First af all, Keith Forsey was involved in a couple of songs. But it was of course Stephen Hague who was the main music man, writing and/or producing most of the songs (unfortunately no New Order/Pet Shop Boys quality to the songs) and writing the score, with a certain John Musser that I have no idea who is. Not that much of score in the film, mostly rock-based stuff (guitar, drums, keyboards) but a couple of nice themes that can be heard here: The first one is almost a rip-off of Vangelis' Missing theme from 1982 by the way. Opinions?

http://somekindofwonderful.org/downloads/mp3/privateshowing.mp3

http://somekindofwonderful.org/downloads/mp3/rightreasons.mp3

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2007 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

God, I haven't seen this film in years. I remember really liking it at the time. I would have picked Lea Thompson over M S Masterson though, MS's hair is way too short and she's a bit too tomboy-ish for me, it's Lea all the way smile
I liked the drumming, opening title track (can't remember if it was song or score), Eric Stoltz's little sister gets some funny lines (some I still quote today, like 'flappin my lips in vain') and that skinhead character (Duncan ??) is also great. It's typical of it's time but I would like to check it out again for old times' sake sometime. Oh, and I have the LP somewhere and always liked the cover song by Lick the Tins.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2007 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

God, I haven't seen this film in years. I remember really liking it at the time. I would have picked Lea Thompson over M S Masterson though, MS's hair is way too short and she's a bit too tomboy-ish for me, it's Lea all the way smile
I liked the drumming, opening title track (can't remember if it was song or score), Eric Stoltz's little sister gets some funny lines (some I still quote today, like 'flappin my lips in vain') and that skinhead character (Duncan ??) is also great. It's typical of it's time but I would like to check it out again for old times' sake sometime. Oh, and I have the LP somewhere and always liked the cover song by Lick the Tins.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2007 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

God, I haven't seen this film in years. I remember really liking it at the time. I would have picked Lea Thompson over M S Masterson though, MS's hair is way too short and she's a bit too tomboy-ish for me, it's Lea all the way smile
I liked the drumming, opening title track (can't remember if it was song or score), Eric Stoltz's little sister gets some funny lines (some I still quote today, like 'flappin my lips in vain') and that skinhead character (Duncan ??) is also great. It's typical of it's time but I would like to check it out again for old times' sake sometime. Oh, and I have the LP somewhere and always liked the cover song by Lick the Tins.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2007 - 12:46 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

Oops!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2007 - 1:19 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

Let's face it, unlike anyone else here, we both live in the 80s! big grin


Trust me guys, the 80s weren't that great...



eek

 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2007 - 3:08 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

The opening track is Propaganda's "Abuse" (a remix of their 1985 song "Dr Mabuse") produced by Stephen Lipson. I suppose many have mistaken it as Stephen Hague's score.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2007 - 3:19 PM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

MacLean,

That was along time ago (my post, not the hair- Fresh Breath still looks like that wink )!

The opening track is Propaganda's "Abuse" (a remix of their 1985 song "Dr Mabuse") produced by Stephen Lipson. I suppose many have mistaken it as Stephen Hague's score.

Dr. Mabuse/Abuse was produced by Trevor Horn and Steve Lipson.

 
 Posted:   Oct 13, 2007 - 10:05 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

MacLean,

That was along time ago (my post, not the hair- Fresh Breath still looks like that wink )!

The opening track is Propaganda's "Abuse" (a remix of their 1985 song "Dr Mabuse") produced by Stephen Lipson. I suppose many have mistaken it as Stephen Hague's score.


Dr. Mabuse/Abuse was produced by Trevor Horn and Steve Lipson.


The end credits of SKOW only lists Lipson as producer. Also the "A Secret Wish" CD by Propaganda lists Lipson as producer, with the additional comment "mixed and matched by S Lipson and T Horn".

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2007 - 11:00 AM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

MacLean,

That was along time ago (my post, not the hair- Fresh Breath still looks like that wink )!

The opening track is Propaganda's "Abuse" (a remix of their 1985 song "Dr Mabuse") produced by Stephen Lipson. I suppose many have mistaken it as Stephen Hague's score.


Dr. Mabuse/Abuse was produced by Trevor Horn and Steve Lipson.


The end credits of SKOW only lists Lipson as producer. Also the "A Secret Wish" CD by Propaganda lists Lipson as producer, with the additional comment "mixed and matched by S Lipson and T Horn".


Trevor Horn is the main producer of DR. MABUSE, that's a fact. For budget reasons, Lipson took over as producer on the A SECRET WISH album.

 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2007 - 11:03 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

LOL, whatever...

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2007 - 11:16 AM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

LOL, whatever...

Honestly:

"As the label was still in its infancy, ZTT were forced to spend all their limited resources on promoting and marketing the Liverpudlian five-piece. This also meant that Trevor Horn was unable to produce Propaganda's album; Stephen Lipson, one of Horn's established studio engineers, took his place. As a result Propaganda's second single, the more pop-oriented "Duel", didn't surface until April 1985."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propaganda_(band)


"After Steve Lipson introduced Trevor to his technique of tapeless sequencing (see under team), Horn decided to produce Propaganda's 'Dr. Mabuse' without using tapes. "We took a Linn, a Fairlight, a DMX, a DSX and a Roland M5, interconnected them and programmed the whole song in each machine. A special device called 'conductor' was used to help synchronize the instruments with each other. So we programmed everything, with the idea in mind, that the girls could sing over it, while we would lean back and just press some buttons - without using any tape. ...Of course on recording day the whole setup went berserk and we had to start all over again to record the whole thing with tape!" However, Horn and Lipson used this technique to copy multitracks, and split them over several measures. "I will never forget the day, when Steve came over and showed me how he copied multitracks. 'Wow', I thought, 'that's something we can use for 'Welcome To The Pleasuredome'!' In the end we worked three months on that song, which was supposed to be only a three minute track, and which we copied and stretched over and over. "

http://www.trevor-horn.de/music.html


"I first met Ralf at the cold end of 1983. Trevor Horn was downstairs creating the instrumental finale for the 12 inch of 'Mabuse'."

http://micksinclair.com/zigzag/propazz.html

Also:
http://www.discogs.com/release/403647

It's common knowledge, Freshy!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2007 - 1:26 PM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

Let's face it, unlike anyone else here, we both live in the 80s! big grin


Trust me guys, the 80s weren't that great...



eek


Wow.

Who are they?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 21, 2007 - 6:35 AM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

Fresh Breath:

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?what=R&obid=26790

and then check this out (click on all of the DR MABUSE links):

http://www.discogs.com/artist/Propaganda

I don't think I could possibly provide anymore evidence on this one! wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2014 - 8:20 PM   
 By:   nitzschemorricone   (Member)

Stephen Hague is a famous pop producer, the man responsible for the sounds of bands like Pet Shop Boys and New Order.

And, before and all that, Hague was a member and co-producer of the still-underrated Jules and the Polar Bears. This was the band that Jules Shear led before embarking on his unsung, but no less worthwhile solo career. Not so similar to the synthpop that Hague was later best known for, the band did leave us with 2 great power-pop LPs, which are highly recommended to those reading this thread.



 
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