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 Posted:   Mar 29, 2001 - 7:30 AM   
 By:   mtodd   (Member)

I am bored at work today...

Does anyone know what film used the fanfare extension for the first time? Didn't the extension have to do with some new screen format or something?

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2001 - 7:50 AM   
 By:   PhiladelphiaSon   (Member)

Technically, it was used first, for "How To Marry A Millionaire". However, Fox chose to release "The Robe" first, since they thought that a "more prestigious" film was better to introduce Cinemascope.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2001 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   Rick Victor   (Member)

The first film to actually use the Fox fanfare with CinemaScope extension was River of No Return. The Robe and How To Marry A Millionaire were the first two films shot in CinemaScope. The traditional fanfare was not used in The Robe. Instead Alfred Newman's main title was played over the visual Fox logo. For Millionaire, Newman recorded a new logo based on the traditional logo but it did not have a CinemaScope extension.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2001 - 10:48 PM   
 By:   Brian D. Mellies   (Member)

Mtodd, The extension you are speaking of was composed by Alfred Newman to accompany the "CinemaScope" logo on the films that 20th Century Fox was releasing in the new wide screen format. I'm not sure which film first used it ("River of No Return" sounds like a good bet), but it definately wasn't used on "The Robe" or "How To Marry A Millionaire", which were the first two films released in the new format. Fox had a lot riding on the acceptance of the new system (like the survival of the studio against TV) and wanted all the publicity they could get for it. Apparently it worked, as CinemaScope was licensed, in fairly short order, by MGM, Warner Bros., and others.
It is worth noting that Darryl F. Zanuck, then Grand High Llama of the studio, was very interested in how a movie sounded. Therefore, he insisted that along with the development of a wide screen format there be an improvement in the way Fox's movies sounded. Because of that, all CinemaScope films from Fox, at least for the first few years, were recorded in 4 track stereo. It is for this reason we are able to enjoy many of the soundtracks currently being released by FSM. Unfortunately, Zanuck's edict was eventually rescinded due to mounting pressure from local theater owners who simply couldn't afford to install the expensive stereo systems in their theaters on top of having to install the new CinemaScope projection systems and screens.
And it took another 40 years for stereo to become the norm.
Now get back to work.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2001 - 11:15 PM   
 By:   H. Rocco   (Member)

After a while, Fox retired the extension in much the same way as they did the Cinemascop credit (although sometimes they still use the whole thing on certain films.) I think George Lucas was responsible for reviving the extension (playing over his "Lucasfilm LTD." credit) in STAR WARS.

My favorite version of the fanfare plus extension is, of course, Elliot Goldenthal's gorgeous distortion of it for ALIEN 3 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/biggrin.gif">

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2001 - 11:56 PM   
 By:   Marian Schedenig   (Member)

quote:
Originally posted by H. Rocco:
My favorite version of the fanfare plus extension is, of course, Elliot Goldenthal's gorgeous distortion of it for ALIEN 3

Definitely!

NP: Anton Bruckner: Symphony #7 (M√ľnchner Philharmoniker, Sergiu Celibidache)

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2001 - 12:01 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

I think the last CinemaScope picture was released in 1966....no need for the extension after that, I guess...until as you pointed out, Williams revived it for "Star Wars" (unless you have a source for crediting this to Lucas, I have to believe it was an affectionate gesture on Williams' part for the memory of Newman).

I grew up in South Carolina in a medium-sized city. Several theaters in town had stereo speakers....from the 1950s. I guess I assumed it was the norm.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2001 - 12:29 AM   
 By:   Brad Wills   (Member)

John Morris used a clever and hilarious orchestration of the logo in THE WORLD'S GREATEST LOVER. Think splash cymbals and a drum set, maybe a wood block. A very 1920's sound.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2001 - 5:21 AM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)

Not only did Williams use the Cinemascope extension as an homage but when he went to record Star Wars he brought the stereo miking plans Newman had devised to use for The Robe which was Fox first stereo recording.
Williams went one step further. After the final battle is won, you hear Obi Wan say
"Remember, Luke - the Force will be with you"
the first six notes of that musical phrase underscoring this is the theme for The Robe -itself considered a force in the movie of the same name!
BTW - The Robe IS the first Cinemascope film - Not How to Marry a Millionaire - it was finished first because it was a quickie.
The Robe start shooting in Scope some two months BEFORE How to Marry a Millionaire started shooting.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2001 - 8:10 AM   
 By:   Brian D. Mellies   (Member)

You are correct, Mr. Caps, about "The Robe" being the first CinemaScope film to go into production and be released. Zanuck held up the release of "Millionaire" because he wanted something more "appropriate" to introduce the new format. And, considering her well known behavior on the set, I think it would be hard for any film involving Marilyn Monroe to be called a "quickie"!

 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2001 - 8:30 AM   
 By:   PhiladelphiaSon   (Member)

I find "The Robe", to be an abysmal film; and find HTMAM to be a much better made film. Certainly a lot more fun to watch, and incredible use of the Cinemascope lense, with characters often at the extreme left or right of the frame. I remember Lauren Bacall saying that she loved working with Cinemascope because it was like doing a stage play. It allowed for lots of movement across the sets.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2001 - 10:21 PM   
 By:   Marian Schedenig   (Member)

quote:
Originally posted by Ron Pulliam:
until as you pointed out, Williams revived it for "Star Wars" (unless you have a source for crediting this to Lucas, I have to believe it was an affectionate gesture on Williams' part for the memory of Newman).

According to the liner notes of the Star Wars Special Edition CD, "it was George Lucas' inspired creative stroke to reintroduce it when Fox release Star Wars in 1977".

Of course, Williams went on to newly record the fanfare when he scored Empire.

NP: Favorite Love Themes of FSM Messageboard Fans

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2013 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   digitiki   (Member)

The Elliot Goldenthal "creepy" version is great from "Alien 3"

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2013 - 2:41 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

This thread was a blast from the past!

NP: Favorite Love Themes of FSM Messageboard Fans

I remember that CD. I think it was Dennis (logied) who made it. What happened to him, btw?

 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2013 - 5:59 PM   
 By:   gsteven   (Member)

I believe CAPRICE (1967) was the last movie to use the extension, before its re-introduction in STAR WARS.

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2013 - 6:27 AM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

The Elliot Goldenthal "creepy" version is great from "Alien 3"

So familiar and then it goes so wrong. It was like having your mother turn into the monster and try and kill you.

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2013 - 7:19 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

The Elliot Goldenthal "creepy" version is great from "Alien 3"

So familiar and then it goes so wrong. It was like having your mother turn into the monster and try and kill you.


My Mother, The Fanfare

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2013 - 8:46 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I believe CAPRICE (1967) was the last movie to use the extension, before its re-introduction in STAR WARS.

That's right, though it wasn't the last Fox film shot in CinemaScope, that being IN LIKE FLINT, which got released a month before CAPRICE.

This has nothing to do with the use of the extended fanfare, but just for the record, CinemaScope was just a brand name for Fox. By the time you get to the last Fox CinemaScope films, it's really Panavision because they were supplying the lenses.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2013 - 10:39 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

This has nothing to do with the use of the extended fanfare, but just for the record, CinemaScope was just a brand name for Fox. By the time you get to the last Fox CinemaScope films, it's really Panavision because they were supplying the lenses.


This had started back in 1958 with MGM films such as HIGH SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL, THE HIGH COST OF LOVING, and IMITATION GENERAL, among others, switching over to Panavision lenses under the CinemaScope moniker.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 14, 2013 - 6:25 AM   
 By:   tarasis   (Member)

The Elliot Goldenthal "creepy" version is great from "Alien 3"

So familiar and then it goes so wrong. It was like having your mother turn into the monster and try and kill you.


Is it similar to the version on the Silvestri Predator album?

 
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