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 Posted:   Jul 15, 2016 - 10:47 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Ironically, alternating between these two:

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2016 - 10:55 PM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

How's the wicker man book, Mr Joshua?

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2016 - 11:14 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

How's the wicker man book, Mr Joshua?

It's LETHAL! wink

I just cracked it open this eve. It begins with Howie and his wife birdwatching an eagle's nest that he's trying to protect from poachers, so there's a bit of symbolic backstory padding going on. We'll see how it goes from there...

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2016 - 4:04 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

After finishing the superb Michael O'Donoghue biography....

you are sick!


How so?


How could you miss such an obvious joke?????

I sure as hell are not gonna 'splain it to you, Lucy.
smile
bruce

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2016 - 6:48 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

One of the most "bookwormy" summers I've had in quite a while.

My main interest has been reading about classical music which I haven't in explored in depth for awhile. Among the 20 plus books I've taken off the library shelves during the past month, my favorites have been David Hurwitz's "owner manual" guides to the works of Shostakovich and Sibelius, Robert Reilly's "Surprised by Beauty," a look at the recovery of beauty and spiritual values in music post-serialism, Ethan Mordden's two opera histories (which inspired me to finally listen to Strauss' "Ariadne auf Naxos," Stravinsky's "The Rake's Progress," Reimann's "Lear," et al), and Norman Lebrecht's highly provocative "The Life and Death of Classical Music" which contains a "100 best classical recordings" which has taken me to YouTube frequently these past weeks.

I've also been reading some of John McPhee's essay books (I've especially liked "The Pine Barrens," a 1960s in-depth look at the history and culture of the New Jersey "piney" region), as well as a couple of works on astonomy. I've never been keen on reading about science, so I've been trying to broaden my knowledge.

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2016 - 8:47 PM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

One of the most "bookwormy" summers I've had in quite a while.

My main interest has been reading about classical music which I haven't in explored in depth for awhile. Among the 20 plus books I've taken off the library shelves during the past month, my favorites have been David Hurwitz's "owner manual" guides to the works of Shostakovich and Sibelius, Robert Reilly's "Surprised by Beauty," a look at the recovery of beauty and spiritual values in music post-serialism, Ethan Mordden's two opera histories (which inspired me to finally listen to Strauss' "Ariadne auf Naxos," Stravinsky's "The Rake's Progress," Reimann's "Lear," et al), and Norman Lebrecht's highly provocative "The Life and Death of Classical Music" which contains a "100 best classical recordings" which has taken me to YouTube frequently these past weeks.


That's interesting - I've just finished "The Musical Companion" by A.L. Bacharach & J.R. Pearce, which offers an historical overview of western music and also individual essays on repertoire for various instruments and combinations. I recently finished "The Twisted Muse: Musicians and Their Music in the Third Reich".


I've also been reading some of John McPhee's essay books (I've especially liked "The Pine Barrens," a 1960s in-depth look at the history and culture of the New Jersey "piney" region), as well as a couple of works on astonomy. I've never been keen on reading about science, so I've been trying to broaden my knowledge.

John McPhee is a great writer, IMO. Back in the olden days when I still read the New Yorker, I would devour each issue, leaving the McPhee article for last because I would think "I'm not interested in reading anything on this arcane subject (whatever it was)". But, having read everything else, I'd finally, grudgingly, start it and find (once again) that McPhee could make even the most unpromising material fascinating.

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2016 - 9:13 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)


That's interesting - I've just finished "The Musical Companion" by A.L. Bacharach & J.R. Pearce, which offers an historical overview of western music and also individual essays on repertoire for various instruments and combinations. I recently finished "The Twisted Muse: Musicians and Their Music in the Third Reich".


Cool. I'll look into those two.


John McPhee is a great writer, IMO. Back in the olden days when I still read the New Yorker, I would devour each issue, leaving the McPhee article for last because I would think "I'm not interested in reading anything on this arcane subject (whatever it was)". But, having read everything else, I'd finally, grudgingly, start it and find (once again) that McPhee could make even the most unpromising material fascinating.

Exactly. His Basin and Range is almost literally the driest of subjects - the formation of plate tectonics in the Utah-Nevada region - yet it turned out to be very readable.

 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2016 - 12:46 PM   
 By:   Warlok   (Member)

On to The Devil`s Chessboard after finishing the solid Mountain of the Dead: The Dyatlov Pass Incident. Only through the prologue and a bit of chapter 1. Already very intriguing. Dulles` daughter was consulted (amongst a huge raft of folk), a lady who seems to understand the true essence of her gamester father.

 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2016 - 12:50 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

After finishing the superb Michael O'Donoghue biography....

you are sick!


How so?


How could you miss such an obvious joke?????

I sure as hell are not gonna 'splain it to you, Lucy.
smile
bruce


Next time, quote the line correctly!

 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2016 - 12:53 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

After finishing the superb Michael O'Donoghue biography....

you are sick!


How so?


How could you miss such an obvious joke?????

I sure as hell aint gonna 'splain it to you, Lucy.
smile
bruce


Next time, quote the line correctly!


what line?

 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2016 - 12:54 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"That's sick!"

 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2016 - 4:23 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Bernard Sumner - Chapter And Verse: New Order, Joy Division & Me.

Great book!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Chapter-Verse-New-Order-Division/dp/0552170496/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1468970505&sr=1-1&keywords=sumner

 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2016 - 2:21 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Just finished Gene


Nice well written and mostly easy to follow (though I don't have much of a biology/genetics background). Spends a bit too long on the history and very little on the topic of the future that got me to read it in the first place. But he is such a great storyteller that it was still enjoyable.

Just finished Empire of Ivory (in Audiobook format read by the always awesome Simon Vance)

Solid series but that book was a bit ridiculous and took things in a direction that I didn't much care for.

Still reading:
48 Laws of Power


Dust by Hugh Howey


The Shibboleth

 
 Posted:   Jul 21, 2016 - 1:04 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Bernard Sumner - Chapter And Verse: New Order, Joy Division & Me.

Great book!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Chapter-Verse-New-Order-Division/dp/0552170496/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1468970505&sr=1-1&keywords=sumner


"....he acknowledges that the music from the movie The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly was the first music to "knock him sideways"

wow!
ordered!
thanks for the tip
bruce

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 26, 2016 - 11:32 AM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

People Live Still in Cashtown Corners by Tony Burgess

A man living in a small Canadian Town starts killing everyone who annoys him. Narrated by the chap himself, it feels a bit sub-American Psycho-like, but rattles along fairly quick and has some humour in it. It's much better than his almost unreadable Pontypool Changes Everything (which he turned into a film i actually love).

 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2016 - 7:01 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2016 - 9:02 AM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

UBIK by Philip K Dick

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2016 - 9:32 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

Fatal Purity: Robespierre and the French Revolution by Ruth Scurr. I noticed it in the library, I really enjoyed it, I didn't quite know just how bloodthirsty the French revolution became, or how long it went on for, & ripples from it went all over the world, in some ways it's still going on. A great story, & as I said, very bloodthirstysmile

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2016 - 1:23 AM   
 By:   Christian K   (Member)

Ninive - Assyria's Wondrous Capital



I do hope that there is something left of this place after the onslaught of ISIS on these ancient ruin sites. frown

 
 Posted:   Nov 14, 2016 - 10:05 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Ninive - Assyria's Wondrous Capital



I do hope that there is something left of this place after the onslaught of ISIS on these ancient ruin sites. frown


I am with you on that. How does that book read? I've been interested in them for a while and even more now that I've been listening to the Hardcore History episodes talking about the fall of Assyria. They got me to want to visit the capitals and one of them has already been completely destroyed.

 
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