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 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 9:28 AM   
 By:   scorechaser   (Member)

I do love jazz, especially of course Miles Davis and his great recordings. I also like very much Thelonios Monk very much, although I only own his LIVE AT THE IT CLUB cd. I am beginning to appreciate John Coltrane lately. Also, I like very much Duke Ellington.

What do you think about Jazz?

Philipp

np: "blue train" (john coltrane)

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 10:52 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

I do love jazz, especially of course Miles Davis and his great recordings. I also like very much Thelonios Monk very much, although I only own his LIVE AT THE IT CLUB cd. I am beginning to appreciate John Coltrane lately. Also, I like very much Duke Ellington.

What do you think about Jazz?

Philipp

np: "blue train" (john coltrane)



Before soundtracks, I used to listen to jazz music.
I still have my collection in a box, full of Blue Notes artists.
My favourite era was 1955 to 1965: the end of accoustics.
The hard bop style of jazz!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 12:56 PM   
 By:   Donna   (Member)

Ohhhhh....one of my least favorite forms of music (country is not far behind!) I need a bit more structure in my music.

Enjoy!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 1:18 PM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Ohhhhh....one of my least favorite forms of music (country is not far behind!) I need a bit more structure in my music.

Enjoy!


Not even Bossa Nova Sis?

Y'know, Girl From Ipanema, One Note Samba, Desafinado etc.

Loads of Jazz has structure, though I think you'd struggle with Miles Davis's Bitches Brew, stuff like Kind Of Blue and Sketches Of Spain are full of form, melody and structure.

Jazz is a huge minefield and covers so many styles.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 1:23 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

I love Duke Ellington, and others of his era, I enjoy the swing and Big Band sound that relies on jazz motives, and the sort of jazz arrangements that Nelson Riddle did for Rosemary Clooney, Sinatra, etc. - I don't care too much for Dixie-land jazz, though. Schifrin's South of the Border jazz is great, too.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 1:49 PM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

Djano Reinhart is fab, I grew up listening to older stuff like Bix Beiderbecke, Jellyroll Morton even Spike Jones as well as Louis Armstrong. I love later stuff too by Jimmy Smith and of course Herbie Hancock and Quincy Jones.

Bebop and earlier "rag" I consider part of the same family as jazz. I'd also put a lot of Hank Mancini's score work in there too.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 2:06 PM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Djano Reinhart is fab, I grew up listening to older stuff like Bix Beiderbecke, Jellyroll Morton even Spike Jones as well as Louis Armstrong. I love later stuff too by Jimmy Smith and of course Herbie Hancock and Quincy Jones.

Bebop and earlier "rag" I consider part of the same family as jazz. I'd also put a lot of Hank Mancini's score work in there too.


Don't forget Lalo Schifrin.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 6:25 PM   
 By:   Filmscorecollecter   (Member)

I have a lot of Sinatra, Dean Martin, and other artists along with my scores.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 7:57 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I love several kinds of jazz, especially the funky Lalo Schifrin kind, some acid jazz a la Weather Report and jazz in between contemporary classical music and big band (Stan Kenton-type stuff). I don't know if you can say that Curtis Mayfield/Isaac Hayes/late Quincy Jones is jazz, but it certainly has elements of it. Bobby McFerrin is cool. And of course, I also love the easy listening cocktail version that John Williams and Henry Mancini excelled at in the 60's.

For starters...

I have troule getting into extremely experimental jazz, though, like Don Ellis' FRENCH CONNECTION scores. Sometimes, it grates more than it reveals interesting textures and creates musical pleasure.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 8:10 PM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)




Before soundtracks, I used to listen to jazz music.
I still have my collection in a box, full of Blue Notes artists.
My favourite era was 1955 to 1965: the end of accoustics.
The hard bop style of jazz!



Lee Morgan
Donald Byrd
Benny Golson
Herbie Hancock
Grant Green
Oliver Nelson
Cannonball Adderley
Gil Mellé

+Miles Davis: "Milestones..." (1958)



NP: Les McCann's "Layers" (1973), track #4 "The Dunbar High School Marching Band" (6:06).

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 8:42 PM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

/late Quincy Jones is jazz, but it certainly has elements of it. Bobby McFerrin is cool.

Have you heard the 1989 and 1995 QJ albums BACK ON THE BLOCK and Q'S JOOK JOINT (respectively)? They are essentially broad history lessons on Afro-American music, with a zillions of celebrity black musician cameos. Nutty stuff like Dizzy Gillespie, James Moody, Miles Davis, Sarah Vaughn and Ella Fitzgerald all jammin' on a modern pop arrangement of BIRDLAND. Q'S JOOK JOINT has a mind-blowing jazz/hip-hop hybrid track in which a giant group featuring the STOMP dancers, rappers Coolio and Melle Mel as well as Chaka Khan and Patti Austin (on backing vocals!!) all jam and rap vocally to the sound of old school big band (by Quincy and horn man Jerry Hey) and uptempo hip-hip beats (by QDIII of course). It's just amazing, and in the sleeve notes Q explains that bebop and hip-hop are one and the same. There's even a pure big band cover of LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLE with Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder and Bono all present, with all of Q's usually musical cohorts playing the instrumental stuff.

Quincy Jones is one of my greatest heroes, and everything he has touched, arranged or produced just has an extra 400% love, attention and heritage attached to it. All of his stuff from the 50s onwards is just lined in gold- often brings tears to my eyes, admittedly! I just wish that for all the support and endless encouragement he gives young black musicians, they would show black musical history some respect and citation.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2006 - 11:26 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

I love Jazz, as well as pseudoJazz.
But not all of it. I find some of the modern jazz hard to follow at times. I can digest and enjoy the older kinds to a greater extent.

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2006 - 10:57 AM   
 By:   Donna   (Member)



Not even Bossa Nova Sis?

Y'know, Girl From Ipanema, One Note Samba, Desafinado etc.

Loads of Jazz has structure, though I think you'd struggle with Miles Davis's Bitches Brew, stuff like Kind Of Blue and Sketches Of Spain are full of form, melody and structure.

Jazz is a huge minefield and covers so many styles.



OK, many many years ago, I used to enjoy The Manhattan Transfer, but never Miles Davis. It was sad to watch the man.....the guys from I Spy loved him and used to reference him all the time, but I just never got it.

About 2 weeks ago, I saw a bit of a recent Manhattan Transfer concert and turned it off after 10 minutes....too much scattin' for me! What happened to them!! LOL

Way down South
In Birmingham
I mean South
In Alabam

smile
smile
smile
Donna

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2006 - 1:57 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I've been a Jazz fdan for 15 years now, with my favorites being Duke Ellington, Miles Davis (1945-1967), Bill Evans, Freddie Hubbard, Grant Green, Bobby Hutcherson, the so-called "West Coast" Jazz of the 1950s, but my all-time favorite is Charles Mingus.

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2006 - 3:12 PM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

I've been a Jazz fdan for 15 years now, with my favorites being Duke Ellington, Miles Davis (1945-1967), Bill Evans, Freddie Hubbard, Grant Green, Bobby Hutcherson, the so-called "West Coast" Jazz of the 1950s, but my all-time favorite is Charles Mingus.


What do you mean by "the so-called 'West Coast' jazz of the 1950's"? Can you elaborate?
What do you prefer: hard bop or West Coast?

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2006 - 3:19 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)




What do you mean by "the so-called 'West Coast' jazz of the 1950's"? Can you elaborate?
What do you prefer: hard bop or West Coast?


"West Coast" Jazz was a softer-sounding, more arrangement oriented form of Jazz. It apparently was a reaction to the "tougher" sounding Bop of Bird and Diz. Lennie Niehaus, Chet Baker, Art Pepper, Gerry Mulligan et al.

I recommend Ted Gioia's excellent book "West Coast Jazz."

I prefer the "Blue Note" sound. But my moods shift from day to day.

 
 Posted:   Jun 28, 2007 - 7:26 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

An absolutely kick-ass rendition of "Lady Be Good", courtesy of Artie Shaw, circa 1939. That's Buddy Rich on drums...And do dig those dancers!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0xM8YRMmyA

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 28, 2007 - 7:30 PM   
 By:   Oblicno   (Member)

My Canadian mates saw Herbie Hancock playing last weekend - lucky dogs.

I like jazz but i don't know what style it is in, i just like the odd song here and there by various people, so it's a bit hard to pinpoint what i like unfortunately for me.

I'd like to get more cd's of it, but if i made a mistake i could end up with something i really hated or was unlistenable (to me). It's like buying Morricone stuff - i either love it or loathe it.

 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2007 - 5:03 AM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

I've loved jazz my whole life. When I was a kid I used to listen to my parents' Basie, Sarah Vaughan, and Ella Fitzgerald records. When I was in high school I was listening to Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday. I even met Jabbo Smith and got his autograph when he was touring with the revue ONE MO' TIME.

I've been privileged to have seen in concert Ella, Carmen Mcrae, Shirley Horn, Betty Carter, Basie with his band, Freddie Hubbard, Woody Shaw, Harry "Sweets" Edison and Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis big band, Benny Carter, Joe Henderson, Arthur Blythe, Arnett Cobb, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, and others I can't recall right now.

My greatest regrets are having missed Ellington, Miles, and Monk in performance, all of whom I could have seen if I had tried hard enough.

I find something to appreciate in just about every kind of jazz from Jelly Roll Morton to Ornette Coleman. And there's so much great jazz available one can spend a lifetime exploring it and never exhaust all the possibilities.

 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2007 - 5:34 AM   
 By:   shicorp   (Member)

Depends on how one defines Jazz. I have loads of Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald, Peggy Lee, Bing Crosby, Mel Tormé, etc., and love them as much as I love to listen to soundtracks, but I'm well aware, that some hardliners wouldn't even mention 'Jazz' and 'Sinatra' in one sentence.

 
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