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 Posted:   May 9, 2007 - 11:07 PM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

I got the test disc for Fantastic Voyage today--it's pretty great despite the fact that I have a full-length audio commentary on it (for more aesthetically-pleasing voices, tune in for the 3-way commentary with melifluous Nick Redman and Jon Burlingame helping me out). The extra features are fascinating with storyboards and production art.

But here's the coolest part: there's a deleted scene that's been talked about before, that takes place just after Stephen Boyd's character has been introduced to the CMDF headquarters by Edmund O'Brien. O'Brien demonstrates the shrinking process to an incredulous "Grant" by showing him miniaturized monkeys on a microscope slide.

The deleted scenes feature illustrates the sequence through storyboard panels and script pages. Now in the script pages all of the Stephen Boyd characters dialogue is attributed to someone named FLINT--the other characters refer to him as Mr. Flint and like Stephen Boyd in Fantastic Voyage, he's a bit of a wisecracker--only moreso. So what? Well, some of you may recall that the producer of Fantastic Voyage was Saul David, who also produced the Derek Flint spy spoof movies with James Coburn...and the way these script pages read it looks like at some point Fantastic Voyage was planned as an entry in the Flint series! The timing would make sense, and it also adds perspective to the long-recounted story of how Leonard Rosenman was first asked to provide a swinging jazz score for Fantastic Voyage--a request that probably sounded insane for a sober-minded science fiction epic, but NOT for a crazy spy spoof about secret agents being injected inside a human body. Psychedelic, man!

I have never heard ANYTHING about this connection before--Saul David left that, and absolutely everything else you might want to know about the movies he made, out of his self-serving, painfully dull autobiography. But I would love to get to the bottom of this...

 
 Posted:   May 9, 2007 - 11:13 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Jeff, this is just the kind of thing that makes being a genre movie fan love the reason he's loving it! This sounds great.

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 12:59 AM   
 By:   Jon A. Bell   (Member)

Jeff, after 41 years of loving this movie, that's an anecdote I've never heard. FANTASTIC stuff!

Can't wait for the DVD (and for the updated VOYAGE TTBOTS feature, too.)

-- Jon

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 1:30 AM   
 By:   The_Mark_of_Score-O   (Member)

But here's the coolest part: there's a deleted scene that's been talked about before, that takes place just after Stephen Boyd's character has been introduced to the CMDF headquarters by Edmund O'Brien. O'Brien demonstrates the shrinking process to an incredulous "Grant" by showing him miniaturized monkeys on a microscope slide.

This scene appears (more or less) in the Dell comic book adaptation that was issued at the time of the film's release.

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 1:51 AM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

Yep--I've got the comic.

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 2:52 AM   
 By:   The_Mark_of_Score-O   (Member)

Not having read it since I was twelve, I can't recall if Isaac Asimov's "novelization" of the screenplay (the only time the famoed science fiction-science fact author did one) contained the scene. Do you know?

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 8:21 AM   
 By:   Greg Bryant   (Member)

Not having read it since I was twelve, I can't recall if Isaac Asimov's "novelization" of the screenplay (the only time the famoed science fiction-science fact author did one) contained the scene. Do you know?

I've read it several times, and I don't remember it.

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 3:30 PM   
 By:   Jon A. Bell   (Member)

Yep--I've got the comic.

Jeez, what a geek!

-- Jon (who's seen Fantastic Voyage and Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea over a dozen times apiece, has an original Remco Playset yellow Seaview toy, and who has various screen grabs from VTTBOTS as his computer desktop wallpaper... not that *I'm* a geek or anything!)

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 3:37 PM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

No, I don't think it's in the novelization either. I had never heard of the monkey scene until much later.

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 4:37 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Jeff, I hope the other two commentators let you get a word in.

On the dvd for COCAINE COWBOYS there are two commentators. One of them (the director , i think) completely dominated the talk. To the point of interrupting every time the other guy tried to say something!

brm

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 6:21 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Jeff, I hope the other two commentators let you get a word in.

I remember a video debate with Jeff Bond awhile back (with other video debatants), and in that case it was Bond who interrupted the others (well, everyone pretty much interrupted each other), so I think he's alright. wink

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 7:49 PM   
 By:   TOR The Wrestler From The Past   (Member)

Jeez, what a geek!

ah, but does he have have the Milton Bradley game?

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Aw, that game's from the shitty Saturday morning cartoon show that bore little resemblance to the movie! big grin

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2007 - 11:31 PM   
 By:   The_Mark_of_Score-O   (Member)

Remember that Harry Saltzman, who co-produced the early Bond films, split with longtime partner Cubby Broccoli to make films on his own. In the early 1970s he was set to make a FANTASTIC VOYAGE-like film called The Micronauts, but the cameras never turned on it. All that was left was a series of fairly successful kids' toys that had been planned as a merchandising tie-in.

 
 Posted:   May 11, 2007 - 12:48 AM   
 By:   Jon A. Bell   (Member)

Remember that Harry Saltzman, who co-produced the early Bond films, split with longtime partner Cubby Broccoli to make films on his own. In the early 1970s he was set to make a FANTASTIC VOYAGE-like film called The Micronauts, but the cameras never turned on it. All that was left was a series of fairly successful kids' toys that had been planned as a merchandising tie-in.

The Micronauts was actually a cool science fiction novel, by Gordon Williams, published in 1977 (and there was a sequel or two I remember reading.) I remember reading this and enjoying it. (No relation to a recent comic series that involved time travel.)

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/w/gordon-m-williams/micronauts.htm

-- Jon

 
 Posted:   May 11, 2007 - 1:03 AM   
 By:   Jon A. Bell   (Member)

Aw, that game's from the shitty Saturday morning cartoon show that bore little resemblance to the movie! big grin

Yeah, but at the age of 7, I thought that cartoon was still cool -- and I loved both the Proteus and the Voyager.

"Busby Birdwell -- Scientist! Inventor! Builder of the Voyager!"

(Whoosh)

-- Jon

 
 
 Posted:   May 11, 2007 - 10:46 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)


...Leonard Rosenman was first asked to provide a swinging jazz score for Fantastic Voyage--a request that probably sounded insane for a sober-minded science fiction epic, but NOT for a crazy spy spoof about secret agents being injected inside a human body. Psychedelic, man!
...


I don't know who is responsible for the final version of the score, but that person should be commended very very well for that.
If they had gone with the "flint version" it would have been a date piece of camp rubbish in the same line of "Diabolik" and "Perry Rhodan".
Rosenman once again was the perfect man at the right place at the right time. I know he does the same thing over and over again but I don't care as long as he does it in the right places, and he does:
Fantastic voyage
Phantom of hollywood
The car
Beneath & battle for the planet of the apes

No better sound than Rosenman's sound.

It will no doubt set me back whilst I already have both films on DVD but I must have the new issues (let me guess in two years HDDVDs with expanded expansions once more).

Jeff: will you also assist in the "Man from U.N.C.L.E." DVD? (Talk about a must have DVD collection!)

Kind regards.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   May 11, 2007 - 11:02 AM   
 By:   TOR The Wrestler From The Past   (Member)

I don't know who is responsible for the final version of the score...If they had gone with the "flint version" it would have been a date piece of camp rubbish in the same line of "Diabolik"

Morricone's "Diabolik" is both beautiful and at times danceable. I always think of it as his answer to Barry's "Goldfinger."

 
 Posted:   May 12, 2007 - 5:02 PM   
 By:   TOR The Wrestler From The Past   (Member)

I've read it several times, and I don't remember it.

The best part of the book (which I could never get past, so it's all I've read) was the cover. Talk about a bastard of science:

 
 
 Posted:   May 12, 2007 - 7:45 PM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)


Morricone's "Diabolik" is both beautiful and at times danceable. I always think of it as his answer to Barry's "Goldfinger."


I didn't mean the music of that film, I meant the film itself. TFV could have become camp because of a camp soundtrack. Diabolik is camp and meant as such. Morricone's music, however sincere it might have been intended doesn't change that fact. The source material and final result don't allow for anything else than that.
When I saw the film I was too busy with the visuals so I didn't hear the music that well.
European 60's movies mostly have a very sharp to the point so shreeking sound to them. Could be to do with the recording equipment used at the time. As a result of that I usually don't get involved with that.

If it is on again (at less ungodly hour) I'll check the music.

Kind regards.

D.S.

 
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