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 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 1:05 AM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

I wanted to add a note at the top of the thread for those who might be reading it for the first time. Although there is technical talk, this thread is not entirely technical mumbo jumbo. One purpose of the thread was to discuss those Lps which haven't had a CD release. So, if uninterested in the technicalities of conversions, skip the mumbo jumbo and take a look at the music discussed. That said:


I'm way behind the curve here as I know that many vinyl collectors have been transferring their holdings to digital for years now. I just recently took the plunge by purchasing one of those Crosley converters. I wanted to go with a USB turntable but realized that my computer is tied up with other matters and there really isn't the time to load Lps onto the harddrive. (I've also have a software package with usb connection for converting Lps and audio tapes or anything else you can plug into it.) I decided that I wanted a stand alone unit that would allow me to convert an Lp to CD with separate tracks. This way I get a CD I can play NOW and that I can load to my hard drive at a later date to tinker with. The Crosely was within my budgetary means. I've only done a few conversions so far but this little unit works like a charm. The speakers are awful but I don't plan on using the unit for playback. And there's a little trick to splitting tracks. Otherwise, I'm pretty thrilled right now. What software/hardware do some of you use for this purpose?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 1:10 AM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

One of the thrills involved in converting Lps to CD is that I once again get to listen to some of the great soundtracks I've got. Bob DiMucci's list of Lps not on CD made me realize what a musical treasure trove I've got (and not just soundtracks). I haven't had a turntable hooked up for several years now (even though I have four or five of them, maybe more) so all of this wonderful music has played in my mind only. Looking over Bob's list was the impetus for me making the plunge and buying a converter. Now the music is out in the open again. Since most of it hasn't been issued on CD the pleasure is all the sweeter. Anybody else had the same experience?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 1:44 AM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

I guess I'm an old-timer. I transfer from my Numark turntable to a Tascam DAT recorder, index the tape, and then burn to a stand-alone Tascam CD recorder. I've been doing it so long I doubt I'd switch even if modern technology has made it easier!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 1:56 AM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

My first conversion was John Barry's THE DOVE. I realize there was a "questionable" CD release a few years back but, y'know what?, I don't have it. But I do have the Lp.

I don't believe I've ever seen this 1974 Gregory Peck production starring Joseph Bottoms and Deborah Raffin but it's based on the true story of a round-the-world sailing adventure by a 16 year-old.

The main title, "The Dove," perfectly captures the carefree sense of skimming over the briny deep. The vocal, "Sail the Summer Winds," evinces a sort of naive optimism towards adventuring. In fact, much of the score has a rather innocent, dare I say, Disney-esque (in the best sense) kid's point-of-view such as the charming harmonica piece "Hitch-Hike to Darwin," that instrument bringing back memories of Dimitri Tiomkin's harmonica-heavy score for the light-hearted Australian-set drama THE SUNDOWNERS. "The Motorbike And The Dove" is another cue that musically creates a mind's eye image of the fun of seeing far off lands and sights.

"Here There Be Dragons" gives us a cue that could easily have come from THE QUILLER MEMORANDUM or THE IPCRESS FILE with a bit of the Bond horns and percussion thrown in. "Alone On The Wide, Wide Sea" is a low-key suspense theme dependent on some interesting percussion. "After The Fire" is a dramatic theme, fragments of the main title threaded throughout with bold Barry brass.

I've got to admit that this is one of Barry's scores that I didn't care for that much 30 years ago. Hearing it again now, I've discovered a small gem.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 2:00 AM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

I guess I'm an old-timer. I transfer from my Numark turntable to a Tascam DAT recorder, index the tape, and then burn to a stand-alone Tascam CD recorder. I've been doing it so long I doubt I'd switch even if modern technology has made it easier!

If it ain't broke, don't fix it! Actually, your method sounds pretty hassle-free. Do you remember your first conversion, soundtrack or otherwise?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 7:09 AM   
 By:   Thread Assasin   (Member)

I'm way behind the curve here as I know that many vinyl collectors have been transferring their holdings to digital for years now. I just recently took the plunge by purchasing one of those Crosley converters. I wanted to go with a USB turntable but realized that my computer is tied up with other matters and there really isn't the time to load Lps onto the harddrive. (I've also have a software package with usb connection for converting Lps and audio tapes or anything else you can plug into it.) I decided that I wanted a stand alone unit that would allow me to convert an Lp to CD with separate tracks. This way I get a CD I can play NOW and that I can load to my hard drive at a later date to tinker with. The Crosely was within my budgetary means. I've only done a few conversions so far but this little unit works like a charm. The speakers are awful but I don't plan on using the unit for playback. And there's a little trick to splitting tracks. Otherwise, I'm pretty thrilled right now. What software/hardware do some of you use for this purpose?

Hi, Ryan:
I've been thinking about one of these myself; you seem happy with your purchase, so I'm wondering which model number you bought. Thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   LRobHubbard   (Member)

Using the Audacity software seems to do the trick for me - I've done all my soundtrack album conversions with it, and have had no complaints.
I previously used a software that came with the burner to do conversions, mostly my rock/pop albums, and I'll have to reburn those -- they don't sound as good as the stuff converted with Audacity.

Best of all, Audacity was freeware.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 9:32 AM   
 By:   mtodd   (Member)

Here is a turntable specifically designed for this (there are other systems out there as well)

http://www.brookstone.com/sl/product/3569-ion-lp-ripping-turntable-usb-output.html

 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 10:51 AM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Some of those converters are really handsome. I just have a cheapo ($80) TEAC P-A688 that plugs into my system with a pair of stereo RCA connectors. I've been able to pull audio from that into my DV camera and edit sound files in Final Cut. It's a bit fiddly, so I have not done many transfers, and I still love the ritual of spinning my vinyl, when I have the time.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 6:06 PM   
 By:   peterproud   (Member)

I use a great program with my Mac called ClickRepair to get rid of clicks and pops...

http://wwwmaths.anu.edu.au/~briand/sound/software_download/clickrepair_info.html

I transferred my "THE DOVE" LP to CD awhile back and absolutely love it. The sound on the ABC album is very good and Barry's score is definitely one of his best of the 70's.

 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

Here is a turntable specifically designed for this (there are other systems out there as well)

http://www.brookstone.com/sl/product/3569-ion-lp-ripping-turntable-usb-output.html


I have this and it works well, once you get the weight balance on the tone arm right. Be warned, I bought the lower end model which does not come with a dust cover....

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 11:08 PM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

Hi, Ryan:
I've been thinking about one of these myself; you seem happy with your purchase, so I'm wondering which model number you bought. Thanks!


Castile, I've got the Crosley CR246. There's another model that will also convert cassette tapes, too, although I think with the audio in jack on this unit I could do that if I wanted. These are available at Target. I bought mine on sale for $279.00.

What I really wanted was something like the USB turntable for which mtodd provided a link. It comes with the Audacity software that LRobHubbard mentioned. I went with the Crosley because I use my computer too much to tie it up with album conversions and decided to go with a stand alone unit. As I mention above, it's not perfect, I've had to "fool" the machine in order to get proper track splitting, but it does work and satisfies my needs at the moment. I can always tweak the music by downloading onto my computer and using the software I have there.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 11:41 PM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

My second and third conversions were also Barry albums.

A friend had mentioned that he really wanted a copy of Barry's Lp "Americans." This is a Barry jazz album that has no music from his film work. Frankly, I was disappointed. There are some moments that remind me of BODY HEAT but, for the most part, you'd never know Barry had anything to do with this. I'm going to give it another listen or two before I make a final judgement.

The other Barry album was SOPHIA LOREN IN ROME. Again, this wasn't what I was expecting and only marginally sounds more like Barry. Most of you probably already know but it was a follow-up TV special to the previously successful ELIZABETH TAYLOR IN LONDON, an album I don't have and haven't heard. However, it's a pleasant easy listening experience, elegant even, befitting it's title star. Ms. Loren sings "Secrets of Rome" and has a nice enough voice.

In some ways this recording could make a good companion to THE DOVE, both albums often sounding like travelogue music, a term which I hesitate to use since it might unintentionally sound like a put-down. Unlike that recording, this one is really heavy on the strings and features the mandolin and accordion liberally, if I've got my instruments right.

Right now my favorite track is the full orchestra version of "Sophia," a rather melancholy tune with a phrase that reminds me of "A Taste of Honey." "The Aggressors" is another cut more to my liking. One of the producers of the show and the album was Philip D'Antoni who later would reach greater fame as producer of THE FRENCH CONNECTION and THE SEVEN-UPS.

Regardless of having it on CD now, I'll keep the album since it is autographed on the back by Barry.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2008 - 11:53 PM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

I use a great program with my Mac called ClickRepair to get rid of clicks and pops...

Looks like a good one. Unfortunately, it looks like I'd have to get Java in order to use it. Plus, there's a license fee. I've got Xitel's Inport Deluxe which is supposed to remove pops and clicks. I've used it to load a cassette tape onto my hard drive and could use it for Lp conversions. Anybody have this or know anything about it?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2008 - 12:20 AM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

Most Ron Goodwin fans might identify the composer with his scores for war-themed movies like 633 SQUADRON, WHERE EAGLES DARE, FORCE 10 FROM NAVARONE, OPERATION CROSSBOW, and BATTLE OF BRITAIN. But he did a lot of other types of movies including several lighthearted films and some outright comedies. In this latter category two of my favorite Ron Goodwin scores are THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN IN THEIR FLYING MACHINES and THOSE DARING YOUNG MEN IN THEIR JAUNTY JALOPIES.

For those who haven't seen it, the first film was an epic comedy of the mid-1960s when mammoth productions like IT'S A MAD, MAD, MAD, WORLD and THE GREAT RACE were most popular. It was a period piece set in 1910 during the early years of aviation and centers around a London to Paris air race. It featured an international cast as the aviators and was directed by Ken Annakin.

Goodwin's "Main Title" sets the tone with a small male chorus singing the praises of the magnificent men backed by a large and boisterous orchestra playing over a mock Charleston dance rhythm and percussion.

"The Great Air Race" is another piece that propels itself forward at a pell-mell pace. "Meanwhile, Back at the Airfield..." careens madly before slowing down to indulge in some musical hijinks with cowbell, tuba, and bells. Really, some of these cues are just crazy action pieces, truly madcap, as it were.

In a picture of this sort it's natural that Goodwin uses national anthems and musical pieces associated with certain countries to help identify and separate the multitude of characters. And there are gentler moments as with the harmonica dominated "Arizona" which denotes the American pilot. A lovely romantic theme can be heard in "The Darlings of 1910" and a reprise of "Arizona."

My favorite cue is "The Railroad Song." This piece is heard in the film during a set piece in which Terry-Thomas' cheating aviator tries to take a shortcut by following the railroad lines. He swoops too low above a moving train and wedges his wheels between cars. He gets out searching for a way to dislodge his air machine. Hopping cars, he heads for the engine. Many composers have musically replicated the sounds of a locomotive. And Goodwin does that here. We hear the chugging engine and the train's whistle. Layered over this is a lighthearted suspense motif as Terry-Thomas spots danger up ahead. The music progressively builds as the situation becomes dire and ends with high drama.

Many of you will remember the Ryko reissues of old United Artists titles which included dialogue from each movie. It was pretty annoying. This album does the same thing but, for some reason, I've always liked it.

A few years later Ken Annakin directed a follow-up film which, like THE GREAT RACE, substituted an early 20th century road rally for the air race. The film was alternately known as MONTE CARLO OR BUST. Many of the earlier cast members were invited back as was composer Goodwin.

This score is more overtly comic yet, like in its predecessor, Goodwin provides colorful melodies suggestive of various foreign nationalities. The main title, sung by Jimmy Durante, is in tone and character of a piece with the first film without being a mere imitation. As he did with a train in the earlier score, Goodwin creates a convincing musical picture of wheezy, whoozy automobiles and flaky flivvers. One of my favorite pieces is "The Schickel Shamble," a pompous piece for trombone mirroring the pompous, over confident German driver Gert Frobe. This album is pure music; there's no dialogue.

Anyway, I think these sorts of comedy scores are difficult to pull off. I think Goodwin does it with aplomb. Maybe not as good as my favorite comedy score, Ernest Gold's MAD WORLD, but certainly right there behind it.

And, does anyone know why THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN alternates between stereo and mono cues? The latter score does not suffer from this problem.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2008 - 9:58 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I've done tons of conversions using the ION, which I love. With Audacity, you can clean up the sound easily, especially the noise between tracks. I have so much great stuff I've done, and most of it sounds splendidly splendid.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 5, 2008 - 10:17 PM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

If I get a second computer this ION turntable sounds like the way to go.

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2008 - 6:02 AM   
 By:   N.A.D   (Member)

In the past I myself have mainly used a standard record turnable via the mic/audio in port on the PC (now onto a usb turntable), dropped the LP to wav's and done audio clean up/restoration with Adobe Audition. Some LP conversions hardly even sound like they were LP's...

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2008 - 12:44 AM   
 By:   Ryan Brennan   (Member)

The other day "Alfred Hitchcock Presents Music To Be Murdered By" fell into my hands. I thought I would burn a CD from the Lp. I'd been aware of the album but had never heard it. Hitchcock introduces most of the music with droll commentary written by his TV show scribe James Allardice. Jeff Alexander arranged and conducted the album.

While it's fun to listen to Hitchcock, this is a novelty album without much novelty. After the first cue, which, given the album title, is an expected suspense theme (no composer credit given -- Alexander?), most of the music is familiar easy listening fare given a bit of the exotica treatment by Alexander's arrangements. The Gounod theme for "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" is included. Overall, though, I'd say this one is only for diehard Lp completists or Hitchcock enthusiasts. The listening experience is pleasant enough but unmemorable.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2008 - 12:58 AM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

In the past I myself have mainly used a standard record turnable via the mic/audio in port on the PC (now onto a usb turntable), dropped the LP to wav's and done audio clean up/restoration with Adobe Audition. Some LP conversions hardly even sound like they were LP's...

I've never done any conversion, but I have my eye on a turntable that you plug into a USB port for this purpose. (Don't recall the make or model offhand.)

I'm guessing that these things make one big file out of the LP, unless you specifically break the tracks up? Not sure about that, will ask the salespeople.

Do I need software to clean up the pops and such?

Anyone's advice on this to a total newbie who hasn't started buying yet would be appreciated. I have thousands of LPs and have no room in my apartment, so I want to start converting these things.

 
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