Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 10:10 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Sure, we're sick and tired of a lot of stuff, including that little gecko with the Manchester (UK) accent ad companies are so fond of using nowadays.

I don't mean so much things from the 70s, such as "rad, man" (i.e, "that is radical, my good sir!") or "far out" or "right on" (and the short-lived derivatives of "farm out" and "right arm").

But what about phrases of yesteryear (olden times)?

"She's the bees knees!"

"You're the cat's meow!"

"Hep cat!"

And from the late 1940s/early 1950s, one of my favorites:

"Hubba! Hubba!"

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 10:14 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)


"Hubba! Hubba!"


I've used that one my entire life. I was born in '71, and if memory serves, it will still in reasonable circulation in the '70s (at least in my region). That one should never die!

I've never quite understood the meaning of "the cat's meow" though.

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 10:36 AM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

"Cherry!"

"Don't blow your top, man."

"give him the business"

"ah, don't be such a wise guy"

"creepy"

(most of these I got from watching LEAVE IT TO BEAVER) wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   Adoy   (Member)

Groovy.

Narley or gnarley.

Bitchen!

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 1:01 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

WhyIoughta...

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 1:01 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Hold your horses, Mac!

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 1:02 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Cool your heels!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 1:47 PM   
 By:   Thread Assasin   (Member)

Hubba Hubba is a classic.
On the east coast (at least my tiny piece of it) we said "Cool your jets," as opposed to "heels." Same thing.
Another was "Maintain," i.e., "cool it," "relax," what have you.

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 1:49 PM   
 By:   JJH   (Member)

I use this at work all the time, mostly at co-workers:


"I like the cut of your jib."

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Hubba Hubba is a classic.
On the east coast (at least my tiny piece of it) we said "Cool your jets," as opposed to "heels." Same thing.
Another was "Maintain," i.e., "cool it," "relax," what have you.



LOL! "MainTAIN!" was a common command in the hippie days when someone's trip made him a bit too hyper.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 2:49 PM   
 By:   JEC   (Member)

Sure, we're sick and tired of a lot of stuff, including that little gecko with the Manchester (UK) accent ad companies are so fond of using nowadays.

I don't mean so much things from the 70s, such as "rad, man" (i.e, "that is radical, my good sir!") or "far out" or "right on" (and the short-lived derivatives of "farm out" and "right arm").

But what about phrases of yesteryear (olden times)?

"She's the bees knees!"

"You're the cat's meow!"

"Hep cat!"

And from the late 1940s/early 1950s, one of my favorites:

"Hubba! Hubba!"


These are all so boss...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 3:50 PM   
 By:   JEC   (Member)

Baby, you're the ginchiest!

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 4:02 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

An excellent topic, Ron my boy, to which I will add:

Baloney-bender (someone who makes their accomplishments sound better than they really are)
Banana oil (nonsense)
Pasadena ("I decline to join you")
Masher (a man who hits on a woman - or a man, too I guess)
Hopped up ("He's going to talk for a long time because he's all hopped up on caffeine.")

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 4:32 PM   
 By:   Thread Assasin   (Member)

If someone was going off the deep end they were said to be " bippin' "

Classic (if extreme) cinematic example of
" bippin' "

Nancy Kelly, head on table, banging its surface with the back of her hand while Henry Jones goes up in flames offscreen and Patty McCormack maniacally plays that little ditty over and over and over on the piano, in "The Bad Seed."

This is template " bippin' "

I guess today's equivalent is to say someone is losing their s*&t.

Parents of high school kids bip regularly, I'm sure. wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 4:39 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

You bet your sweet bippy! (And, yes, this was the same bippy of "The Maltese Bippy" fame!"

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 5:04 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Groovy.

Narley or gnarley.

Bitchen!


Bitchin'? Has that left the vernacular? Hey, I still use it from time to time.

To the hair stylist: "Give me a Bitchin' 'Do'!

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Groovy.

Narley or gnarley.

Bitchen!


Bitchin'? Has that left the vernacular? Hey, I still use it from time to time.

To the hair stylist: "Give me a Bitchin' 'Do'!



Oh, I have a variation of that one!

"Give me a 'do', bitch!"

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 5:08 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

There is also diner speak:

"Gimme an Adam and Eve on a raft, and wreck 'em!"

(that's two scrambled eggs on toast!"

If you don't wreck 'em, then they're poached and served on toast.

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 5:14 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Groovy.

Narley or gnarley.

Bitchen!


Bitchin'? Has that left the vernacular? Hey, I still use it from time to time.

To the hair stylist: "Give me a Bitchin' 'Do'!



Oh, I have a variation of that one!

"Give me a 'do', bitch!"


See there? It still works.

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2008 - 6:13 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Groovy.

Narley or gnarley.

Bitchen!


Bitchin'? Has that left the vernacular? Hey, I still use it from time to time.



Certainly not! I still say groovy, gnarly, and bitchin', sometimes in the same sentence (like this one, for example).

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.