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 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 10:11 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

There is one particular "sound" I really love; what I call "baroque jazz melancholy". This is an almost classical tune with a jazz undercurrent or backbeat and with a minor-moded melody to go.

Examples include the "Main Title" from THE EIGER SANCTION or "Main Title" and "Rickard Escapes" from THE LAST RUN. If there's a harpschicord that goes with it, even better.

Do you know what I'm talking about? Any other examples of this?

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 5:43 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Would you put Alex North's 'Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf?' in that overall category?

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 5:54 PM   
 By:   Heath   (Member)

Goldsmith was pretty good with that style. There's quite a bit of it in Ransom, Sebastian, etc. Laurie Johnson too with The Avengers, although that's quite perky and cheerful.

Post-modern pop baroque - it's a very 1960s conceit. I don't know who started it. The Beatles probably!

You'd love the Swingle Singers. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 6:00 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

You want Lalo Schifrin's "Marquis de Sade."

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 6:50 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Certainly Jean Ledrut's music for The Trial (especially his arrangement of Albinoni's Adagio) would fall under this thread title.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 7:01 PM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

I don't think the version of Albinoni was by Ledrut, who was (as Welles told it) one of the film's producers, whom he had to humour by allowing him to compose a score for the film. After becoming frustrated with Ledrut, he got hold of a set of Benny Goodman variations on the Albinoni piece, and used those throughout the film. I'll check my copy of THIS IS ORSON WELLES tonight to make sure I got the story right.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 7:04 PM   
 By:   EthanStoller   (Member)

This is one of my favorite styles also. Two great examples not from the film score world--
"Desert Sands" by John Kirby: http://www.dynamiteham.com/desertsands.mp3

and "Snowfall" by Eddie South:
http://www.dynamiteham.com/snowfall.mp3

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 7:41 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I don't think the version of Albinoni was by Ledrut, who was (as Welles told it) one of the film's producers, whom he had to humour by allowing him to compose a score for the film. After becoming frustrated with Ledrut, he got hold of a set of Benny Goodman variations on the Albinoni piece, and used those throughout the film. I'll check my copy of THIS IS ORSON WELLES tonight to make sure I got the story right.

I have the soundtrack recording and it is most certainly not Benny Goodman or his variations - it's all Ledrut, like it or not, and I like it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 8:40 PM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

That's interesting. Welles was a storyteller, though, so it wouldn't be the first time he fudged things.

(I'm surprised there was an album - I assume it has never made it to CD?)

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 10:00 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

That's interesting. Welles was a storyteller, though, so it wouldn't be the first time he fudged things.

(I'm surprised there was an album - I assume it has never made it to CD?)


The Trial soundtrack is really interesting. When I was a young teen I saw the film and really liked it (I would have been fourteen, I think). We had a French bookshop in Beverly Hills (I lived about a mile away) back then, and one day I walked in and they had a little section of French EPs, and they had one for The Trial, which I still have today.

Years later, in the mid-1970s, a friend of mine gave me a birthday present - he'd won it on a soundtrack auction, and it was a full LP to The Trial. I couldn't believe it. To this day, that is the only copy of that LP I've ever seen. When I got rid of my LPs I sold it, after transferring it to cassette (which I have since transferred to CD) - I really regret having sold it. I may, in fact, have the fellow I sold it to retransfer it directly from the vinyl - he lives here in LA.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 10:19 PM   
 By:   Devmo   (Member)

There is one particular "sound" I really love; what I call "baroque jazz melancholy". This is an almost classical tune with a jazz undercurrent or backbeat and with a minor-moded melody to go.



I like this sound too, Thor, and something you might try is the album 'Blues on Bach' by the Modern Jazz Quartet.
I would say many tracks on that album fit the description of "baroque jazz melancholy" perfectly.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 10:20 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

There is one particular "sound" I really love; what I call "baroque jazz melancholy". This is an almost classical tune with a jazz undercurrent or backbeat and with a minor-moded melody to go.



I like this sound too, Thor, and something you might try is the album 'Blues on Bach' by the Modern Jazz Quartet.
I would say many tracks on that album fit the description of "baroque jazz melancholy" perfectly.


Blues on Bach is a masterpiece.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2008 - 10:21 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I would also say that Stanley Myers's score to Hubert Cornfield's The Night Of The Following Day would fit this description.

 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2008 - 6:12 AM   
 By:   Heath   (Member)

The Trial soundtrack is really interesting. When I was a young teen I saw the film and really liked it (I would have been fourteen, I think). We had a French bookshop in Beverly Hills (I lived about a mile away) back then, and one day I walked in and they had a little section of French EPs, and they had one for The Trial, which I still have today.

Years later, in the mid-1970s, a friend of mine gave me a birthday present - he'd won it on a soundtrack auction, and it was a full LP to The Trial. I couldn't believe it. To this day, that is the only copy of that LP I've ever seen. When I got rid of my LPs I sold it, after transferring it to cassette (which I have since transferred to CD) - I really regret having sold it. I may, in fact, have the fellow I sold it to retransfer it directly from the vinyl - he lives here in LA.



I like Ledrut's score too. I even like the way Welles monkey'd around with it on the soundtrack - playing one track in particular (the Ondes Martenot cue) at varying speeds and double/triple tracking it with other cues. Very atmospheric and appropriately disorientating. The jazz cues are great too, and the Albinoni is beyond reproach.

It's a nice album. Very persuasively programmed. I have a copy of the LP. I bought it from a very nice German dealer last year. Cost me a fair bit of dough, and the vinyl was pretty crackly. But the guy also supplied me with a CDR of a clean recording of it from another, better, LP source. Great!

 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2008 - 6:37 AM   
 By:   Misanthropic Tendencies   (Member)

Cassandra Crossing, The Omega Man.

 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2008 - 6:51 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

If nobody mentions Miles Davis and 'Sketches of Spain', then WELL ... I MEAN 'WELL' ...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2008 - 6:51 AM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

The remarks on THE TRIAL by Heath and Haines above are very interesting. I saw the film about half a year ago for the first time, and the music is part of its very powerful spell.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2008 - 9:07 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Can't believe nobody's chimed in with Morricone yet. There are many examples, and it's one of my favourite types of track too. I'm at work now so examples will have to wait...other than Quasi un Vivaldi (from Revolver). The titles tend to be in Italian, and although I know where to find them, I can't identify them off the top of my head.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2008 - 10:48 AM   
 By:   no1maestro   (Member)

One of the examples I think you might be familiar with is "A Little Romance" by Georges Delerue. From your description this might just fit!!

 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2008 - 8:43 PM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

I don't think the version of Albinoni was by Ledrut, who was (as Welles told it) one of the film's producers, whom he had to humour by allowing him to compose a score for the film.

Here's what Francois Thomas and Jean-Pierre Berthome have to say about the score:

From the scriptwriting stage Welles had planned to use Albinoni's Adagio as a musical theme. Jean Ledrut, the composer hired by the producers, ...did not get on with Welles and the director had no scruples about changing his work beyond all recognition in the edit and sound mix.

In addition to two transcriptions of the Adagio, Welles asked Ledrut, a classically-trained musician, to provide a series of jazz variations on the piece, most of which were played by the Martial Solal trio. In this way he confined Ledrut to the role of adaptor, allowing him to record only one more personal, original piece, a slow march for orchestra, and two extracts from an earlier operetta of his. Welles then had eleven pieces for a total running time of forty-two minutes. From this he put together seventy-one minutes of music, distributed over more than fifty places.


One of tracks by the Martial Solal trio is available on the Universal France album "A bout de souffle".

 
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