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 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 1:45 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

-BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA - Kilar.
I'm completely enthralled by this title. It is thoroughly melodic, it has creepy, scary parts, and the pounding symphonic power of it in other places is thrilling and satisfying. The score is so good that while listening to it, I have to envision my own, better Dracula movie to go with it.

Even the Annie Lennox song has grown on me, with it's wilted, bloodless melody skillfully conveying the Stockholm syndrome of a fetching Dracula victim. Her feeble embrace of the undead is eerie. But the song is just a bonus track; this CD would still be tops without Lennox.

-INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE - Goldenthal.
I don't quite get this score (although I liked the movie). Some moods and bits of creepy insanity are conveyed, but I needed more melody or something to tie it together. The CD is not long but it's tough going for me.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 3:30 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Both scores are very much products of their composers. Kilar with his dark and haunting music, while Goldenthal's has a more erratic batch of movements. I wouldn't be without either, myself...

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 4:50 AM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

This is a cool thread. I think I would have to ask myself how each of these scores has ages over the years. For me, I listen to Kilar's Dracula more often that Goldenthal's interview mostly because of the Main Titles, Dracula/Mina, and tracks such as those. Goldenthal's Interview is a splendid score though. I just find myself reaching for either Titus or Cobb in that composer's case.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 5:12 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

...and Williams v Glass in the other semi-final?

For my money, Kilar would be playing Williams in the final. Kilar would win, but it would take extra-time and a penalty shoot-out.

I love all these scores, but Kilar's brooding magnificence edges out the beautiful wind-swept Williams, the hypnotic Glass and the solid Goldenthal.

TG

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 5:16 AM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

I love both. And the Glass. And the Williams. Let them all have their turn!

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 6:03 AM   
 By:   Dadid L   (Member)

Hey, gentlemen, don't pass on James Bernard. In fact, Dracula is obviously an inspiring subject ; I made a great "2 CD Vampire combo" some years ago, great listening.

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 9:27 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

I've never even heard the Williams. I'm a man of few grails, but I suspect if I ever saw this movie, I'd end up wanting the score.

It is listed at Screen Archives for $124.95 at the moment. Not gonna do it.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 9:53 PM   
 By:   Mikhail   (Member)

Y'know, some time ago I bought the Naxos release of Kilar's music from Dracula, Konig..., Death and the Maiden, etc. and thoroughly enjoyed the selections from the former on that CD. So I went to look for the OST and I was kinda scared off by the topmost customer review for it on Amazon (titled "Great score, lousy CD").

Can any of you attest to the accuracy of what the reviewer was saying there? Is it a worthwhile recording to get aside from the editing issues?

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 10:06 PM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

Mikhail,

I have both the original soundtrack album and the Naxos release and I enjoy and recommend both.

Some time ago I met an editor who began telling me about Kilar's music from Dracula. Apparently he wrote at least some portions of his score freely without reference to the film, and wrote in such a way that the recordings could be edited later to fit the final cut. I heard a part of a demo that he told me went on for nearly 15 minutes. Once you've heard his concert music (like "Exodus") it's easy to believe.

Therefore, if this is all true then the album probably represents a sort of Dracula concept album for him rather than an attempt to reflect the way the music ended up in the film.

For what it's worth.

 
 Posted:   Dec 10, 2008 - 10:10 PM   
 By:   Jon A. Bell   (Member)

How about two different Dracula ballets, both of which are noteworthy? (I own both.)

Feeney: Dracula

http://www.amazon.com/Feeney-Dracula/dp/B0000014FU/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1228975565&sr=8-2

Di Lorenzo: Dracula, the Seduction

http://www.amazon.com/Di-Lorenzo-Dracula-The-Seduction/dp/B00004X0M5/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1228975565&sr=8-3

And top them off with three scores for Nosferatu:

Popol Vuh, for the Klaus Kinski remake:

http://www.amazon.com/Nosferatu/dp/B00042YKUA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1228975669&sr=1-2

James Bernard's score to the 1922 film:

http://www.amazon.com/Nosferatu-Symphony-Horrors-1998-Score/dp/B000004BQO/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1228975669&sr=1-5

Jill Tracy and the Malcontent Orchestra performing her score to the 1922 film:

http://cdbaby.com/cd/jilltracy2

Even more "Dracula"-related music:

http://cdbaby.com/found?allsearch=dracula

-- Jon

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2008 - 12:20 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

Y'know, some time ago I bought the Naxos release of Kilar's music from Dracula, Konig..., Death and the Maiden, etc. and thoroughly enjoyed the selections from the former on that CD. So I went to look for the OST and I was kinda scared off by the topmost customer review for it on Amazon (titled "Great score, lousy CD").

Can any of you attest to the accuracy of what the reviewer was saying there? Is it a worthwhile recording to get aside from the editing issues?


Apparently there's a cue or two not on the CD, a mountain train ride if I recall someone saying so. But I think all the film's themes are on it. And if you enjoy high-class, top-quality eerie scares, this CD is for you. Plus, you get a thundering, massive, powerful rush of menace, like an oncoming locomotive of evil. The score has many haunting (no pun intended) musical ideas that can fill your mind with imagery.

Maybe you should rent the DVD to get an idea of the score, or borrow it from the public library. Screen Archives has the Kilar CD for $6.95 at the moment.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2008 - 3:30 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)


Di Lorenzo: Dracula, the Seduction

http://www.amazon.com/Di-Lorenzo-Dracula-The-Seduction/dp/B00004X0M5/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1228975565&sr=8-3


I have this. It's very different -- for starters, it's done by a brass sextet with a woodwind (shifting) and drums. A lot of it is far from 'gothic horror' music, but I like it nonetheless.

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2008 - 3:37 AM   
 By:   Dr. Lao   (Member)

Both deserve extended releases!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2008 - 7:19 PM   
 By:   Mikhail   (Member)

Therefore, if this is all true then the album probably represents a sort of Dracula concept album for him rather than an attempt to reflect the way the music ended up in the film.

For what it's worth.


Thanks Ed. If Kilar had a hand in editing the album, I'm not too worried about it, and in any case, there's no movie for me to compare it to. Maybe I'll get it soon.

Maybe you should rent the DVD to get an idea of the score, or borrow it from the public library. Screen Archives has the Kilar CD for $6.95 at the moment.

Eek no! I'm extremely into music and moderately into film music, but not so big on movies. Especially not ummm... vampire ones. smile

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2008 - 8:18 PM   
 By:   Holly Mitchell   (Member)

-BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA - Kilar.
I'm completely enthralled by this title. It is thoroughly melodic, it has creepy, scary parts, and the pounding symphonic power of it in other places is thrilling and satisfying. The score is so good that while listening to it, I have to envision my own, better Dracula movie to go with it.


Wow! I am listening to sound samples of BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA via Amazon:

http://tinyurl.com/6ezquh

I am definitely picking this one up. Thank you for the post, ZapBrannigan!

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2008 - 8:27 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

I've had both scores since they were released.

Kilar's score is brilliant, effective and memorable. The pre-credit sequence music and the Vampire Hunters theme are exquisite. And there's a particularly disturbing piece loaded with creepy voices and whinnying horses that can be challenging to get through. Really well done. Kilar is a striking and potent composer.

Goldenthal's score is...well...it's good, yet it doesn't resonate terribly well. Works effectively in the film, but I never find myself wanting to revisit it. It doesn't hold the thematic power of Kilar's score.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2008 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   Dan Hobgood   (Member)

For me, Williams' effort is tops.

Dan

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2008 - 5:16 AM   
 By:   Les Jepson   (Member)

For me, Williams' effort is tops.

Dan


At the time of the film's release, I remember reading somewhere that John Williams never watched horror pictures, so he came to the genre with a fresh approach. It's often rewarding when a composer tackles a new (to him or her) genre. One thinks of North and SPARTACUS, Morricone and THE THING, and Kilar's BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA, among others.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2008 - 9:33 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

For me, Williams' effort is tops.

Dan


At the time of the film's release, I remember reading somewhere that John Williams never watched horror pictures, so he came to the genre with a fresh approach.


I think he said Dracula movie, not horror one in general. Still though.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 12, 2008 - 10:20 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)


At the time of the film's release, I remember reading somewhere that John Williams never watched horror pictures, so he came to the genre with a fresh approach.


Hi Les

It was Dracula rather than horror (as mentioned above) and you saw it on the back of the LP sleeve!

BTW I haven't forgotten our discussion about Russian film composers...just distracted - sorry!

 
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