Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2018 - 11:51 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

This film below is NFL Films gold for those of us who have posted on this thread.

It's a Sam Spence documentary. From the "Lost Treasures" series. Here Spence talks about some the influences for his music. Rozsa and Tiomkin are mentioned. Spence makes no bones about the influences. This program also gives us some insight into his process with input from the Sabols. The debut of Facenda. NFL Films composer Tom Hedden also weighs in. And if that weren't enough, there's also an interview with film editor Yoshio Kishi. It's been a while since I saw this. Good stuff.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71MPvwqBE80


Thanks! Absolutely awesome!
Those of us old enough to remember the old highlight shows such as those for Notre Dame and other NCAA schools with the traditional marches were blown away by the approach used by NFL Films when they began using Spence’s music and that of the music libraries as well.
The way they filmed the games from the field perspectives instead of the typical ones that were shot from the press box or stands, the narration, the music, that all came together at just the right time to be magical.
I wonder if most of today’s audiences truly appreciate how significant their influence was.
I have many TWIPF and NFL GOTW videos and most of them I have also converted to audio so I can listen to the shows when I’m doing yard work, etc. I love the music associated with them first and foremost, but I also love listening to those old shows from the 60s and 70s with the narration and all.
At the very least, I and many others, I assume, can thank NFL Films for an introduction to great music artists such as Syd Dale, Keith Mansfield, Johnny Pearson, Alan Hawkshaw, William Soden, and many others.

 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2018 - 12:05 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Been trawling YouTube listening to NFL Films selections, and while it's not my personal favorite--though it's up there on the list--I think "Round Up" is the definitive NFL Films musical cue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paDVrOLssN0&app=desktop


One of my favorites! I love this cue.

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2018 - 4:39 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Those of us old enough to remember the old highlight shows such as those for Notre Dame and other NCAA schools with the traditional marches were blown away by the approach used by NFL Films when they began using Spence’s music and that of the music libraries as well.

The way they filmed the games from the field perspectives instead of the typical ones that were shot from the press box or stands, the narration, the music, that all came together at just the right time to be magical.

I wonder if most of today’s audiences truly appreciate how significant their influence was.


Until NFL Films, every sport highlight reel was of the "Rah-Rah-Rah/ Well, how about that?" variety. Baseball is still like that, though one musical bright spot is the aforementioned "Gathering Crowds", composed by John Scott.



This is a Super Bowl IX and X video out there which uses "Gathering Crowds." I believe someone just added to existing highlights, but I will always associate the theme with "TWIB." However, the piece could work with the appropriate NFL visuals, which now has me wondering if it ever was used as such!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2018 - 6:35 PM   
 By:   ANZALDIMAN   (Member)

This film below is NFL Films gold for those of us who have posted on this thread.

It's a Sam Spence documentary. From the "Lost Treasures" series. Here Spence talks about some the influences for his music. Rozsa and Tiomkin are mentioned. Spence makes no bones about the influences. This program also gives us some insight into his process with input from the Sabols. The debut of Facenda. NFL Films composer Tom Hedden also weighs in. And if that weren't enough, there's also an interview with film editor Yoshio Kishi. It's been a while since I saw this. Good stuff.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71MPvwqBE80


Thanks! Absolutely awesome!
Those of us old enough to remember the old highlight shows such as those for Notre Dame and other NCAA schools with the traditional marches were blown away by the approach used by NFL Films when they began using Spence’s music and that of the music libraries as well.
The way they filmed the games from the field perspectives instead of the typical ones that were shot from the press box or stands, the narration, the music, that all came together at just the right time to be magical.
I wonder if most of today’s audiences truly appreciate how significant their influence was.
I have many TWIPF and NFL GOTW videos and most of them I have also converted to audio so I can listen to the shows when I’m doing yard work, etc. I love the music associated with them first and foremost, but I also love listening to those old shows from the 60s and 70s with the narration and all.
At the very least, I and many others, I assume, can thank NFL Films for an introduction to great music artists such as Syd Dale, Keith Mansfield, Johnny Pearson, Alan Hawkshaw, William Soden, and many others.



Thanks jackfu.

I appreciate this stuff from long ago as you do too. We grew up with it as kids in the early 1970's. The music and narration captured our attention as youngsters. The game seemed so much more special then. Larger than life even. Facenda would often use specific words during his narratives and as a kid I'd pull out a dictionary to learn about those words. I suppose I was not the only kid doing that sort of thing back then. Such great characters and colorful personalities assembled on the gridiron stage of the 60's and 70's. And for some of us (like myself) NFL Films and it's music was also an early introduction that lead me further to appreciating the art of film and television music scoring and their composers.

Dave Volsky deserves special thanks for what he has done with his excellent you tube channel. I'm sure you'll agree. Some here have already started linking the videos. An extensive library of music from the early years of NFL Films unmatched anywhere else. And unlikely to be matched by anyone else. Much of it rare. Not just Spence but the artists you mentioned above and beyond. And it keeps evolving. The memories of the greats of the game and their music from long ago continues to live on all in one place.

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2018 - 6:58 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Is there a channel devoted to GOTW TWIPF videos ?
Thanks!

 
 Posted:   Nov 15, 2018 - 2:50 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I appreciate this stuff from long ago as you do too. We grew up with it as kids in the early 1970's. The music and narration captured our attention as youngsters. The game seemed so much more special then. Larger than life even. Facenda would often use specific words during his narratives and as a kid I'd pull out a dictionary to learn about those words. I suppose I was not the only kid doing that sort of thing back then. Such great characters and colorful personalities assembled on the gridiron stage of the 60's and 70's. And for some of us (like myself) NFL Films and it's music was also an early introduction that lead me further to appreciating the art of film and television music scoring and their composers.

While I'm not as ancient as you and Jackfu, I am old enough to remember my 1970s elementary school days when our burned-out teachers would put on a reel-to-reel of those NFL highlights. It was a welcome respite from all that "deep learning" we had to do. Even the girls, who were not sports fans, enjoyed NFL games just so long as they were presented "NFL Films style."

 
 Posted:   Nov 15, 2018 - 4:54 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

While I'm not as ancient as you and Jackfu, I am old enough to remember when in my 1970s elementary school days when our burned-out teachers would put on a reel-to-reel of those NFL highlights. It was a welcome respite from all that "deep learning" we had to do. Even the girls, who were not sports fans, enjoyed NFL games just so long as they were presented "NFL Films style."

"Vintage", Jim, we're vintage. wink
And as you stated, ANZALDIMAN, Dave Volsky is awesome! I've been a fan of his for years now. He has lots of music posted as well as some other highlight videos. I've attached links to his and a couple of other folks' youtube pages as well.
Kevin Reidy once had hundreds of GOTW and TWIPF vids up but as of today they're gone. Heartbreaking for me. The NFL or NFL Films has a tendency to go after some of these videos for copyright issues, but not so much the music. I don't see the harm in folks posting these old videos, just as long as they're not selling them.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqfPGKps_-i_uRiWm5Pj2-w/videos
https://www.youtube.com/user/b17bomber/videos
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi-cxJourXlROlS8P6eG5kw/videos

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 15, 2018 - 1:14 PM   
 By:   ANZALDIMAN   (Member)

Thanks for the links jackfu.

 
 Posted:   Nov 15, 2018 - 5:47 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

smile

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 15, 2018 - 9:44 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Does anybody remember N.F.L.'s "Football Follies" remember their feature parodies ("Top Helmet", "The Mediocre Eleven") when they used some of Dominic Frontiere's music from "A Name For Evil" for their parody "Dial M For Moron"?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 15, 2018 - 9:44 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Does anybody remember N.F.L.'s "Football Follies" remember their feature parodies ("Top Helmet", "The Mediocre Eleven") when they used some of Dominic Frontiere's music from "A Name For Evil" for their parody "Dial M For Moron"?

 
 Posted:   Nov 16, 2018 - 1:46 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Does anybody remember N.F.L.'s "Football Follies" remember their feature parodies ("Top Helmet", "The Mediocre Eleven") when they used some of Dominic Frontiere's music from "A Name For Evil" for their parody "Dial M For Moron"?

I remember them. THey would probably be considered "inappropriate" in today's world.
Most of the "follies" were players getting the shite knocked out of them!

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2018 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.