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 Posted:   Jan 20, 2009 - 12:14 AM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

I actually bought that issue that spring, but my interest in film music was on the wane then. Two years later, when I was back interested in scores, I re-read that Starlog - read his letter with new intrigue - wrote Lukas - and subscribed to the then-newsletter FSM.
Thanks, Lukas - my film music hobby has been immeasurably enhanced by your endeavors. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2009 - 11:43 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

He, he...just read it on the main page. Very cute, Lukas. You sure loved that word "prolific". I especially loved how you thought that was a singular QUALITY of a composer's output (well, he's PROLIFIC, so he's GOTTA be good!). smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2009 - 1:12 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

I remember when I had a letter published in THE FLASH back in 1973 when I was a junior in high school. I felt famous! It was in my comic book collecting days....

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2009 - 2:16 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

He was 15 years old and he already talked about that "synthesizer trash"...

How little things have changed...

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2009 - 2:32 PM   
 By:   Max Bellochio   (Member)

An interesting aspect, Lukas, is that one can see how your public feelings have tempered over the years. I subscribed for a long time (from the Black and White paper pamplet days to the final print issue) and see how the enjoyably sarcastic tone of the writing needed to evolve, as you started to get more into CD production. It shouldn't take a rocket scientist to figure that in order for you to be able to build your portfolio of projects, something needed to change in order for you to develop, foster, and build relationships with people in the industry.

In some way, I miss the days when you, Jeff, and the Kaplan brothers would offer an irreverant perspective in areas that today could be branded as "fanboy" gripes. However there was something different about the way you guys did it. Yeah, you may have shredded a few composers during this time, but you also seemed to poke fun at yourselves occasionally. For me, this seemed to be the reasonable balance, but I defintely understand why you needed to change the tone and approach of the magazine.

When do you think you became cognizant that something needed to change? Was it after the Jerry Goldsmith AIR FORCE ONE review debacle or the multi-part Hans Zimmer article, where things seemed very unconfortable in the beginning part of the article.

MaxB

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2009 - 2:37 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

He was 15 years old and he already talked about that "synthesizer trash"...

How little things have changed...


I knew there was a reason I liked that letter...

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2009 - 2:41 PM   
 By:   zippy   (Member)

An interesting aspect, Lukas, is that one can see how your public feelings have tempered over the years. I subscribed for a long time (from the Black and White paper pamplet days to the final print issue) and see how the enjoyably sarcastic tone of the writing needed to evolve, as you started to get more into CD production. It should'nt take a rocket scientist to figure that in order for you to be able to build your portfolio of projects, something needed to change in order for you to develop, foster, and build relationships with people in the industry.

In some way, I miss the days when you, Jeff, and the Kaplan brothers would offer an irreverant perspective in areas that today could be branded as "fanboy" gripes. However there was something different about the way you guys did it. Yeah, you may may have shreadded a few composers during this time, but you also seemed to poke fun at yourselves occasionally. For me, this seemed to be the reasonable balance, but I defintely understand why you needed to change the tone and approach of the magazine.

When do you think you became cognizant that something needed to change? Was it after the Jerry Goldsmith AIR FORCE ONE review or the multi-part Hans Zimmer article, where things seemed very unconfortable in the beginning part of the article.

MaxB


I'd love reading a response from Lukas on this subject. I hope he does.

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2009 - 3:20 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

I'd love reading a response from Lukas on this subject. I hope he does.


Me too.

Lukas, I think I recall reading either in the magazine or here online that you (or somebody) had a "brush" with Jerry Goldsmith (or somebody) and asked him what he thought of Film Score Monthly, and he said (something like):

"Yeah, that WOULD be a good magazine, if there weren't so many damned JUDGMENTS in it."

Do I have any of this legend correct, and if so, was it an influence on your writing style since then?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2009 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

I was among those who wrote to Lukas after reading his letter in Starlog. Ironically I tried to recruit him into the Goldsmith Society (of which I was US rep at the time). Fortunately for all of us Lukas decided to start his own club instead!

I still have all my early copies of Soundtrack Correspondence List (which later became The Soundtrack Club) and consisted of news from Lukas, and reviews by Andy Dursin. "Maurice Jarre is scoring Richard Edlund's Solar Crisis and John Barry will score Kevin Costner's Dances With Wolves" are among the tidbits included in newsletter #2!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2009 - 9:46 AM   
 By:   ScottDS   (Member)

When do you think you became cognizant that something needed to change? Was it after the Jerry Goldsmith AIR FORCE ONE review debacle or the multi-part Hans Zimmer article, where things seemed very unconfortable in the beginning part of the article.

MaxB


Air Force One review debacle? Please elaborate. smile

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2009 - 9:51 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

I love your multile uses of the word "best" in the first paragraph. :-)

Good times, great memories. To be young again. . .

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2009 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

The letter to a magazine with a cadre of sympathetic readers is a classic launching ramp for new organizations. Recall that the Max Steiner Music Society (the very first film composer organization) was announced in the back pages of Films in Review in the late 1960s. And the Miklos Rozsa Society gained initial traction in High Fidelity.

What exactly is Starlog? Does it focus on literary as well as dramatized SF?

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2009 - 11:10 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

This is nostalgic for me even though I missed that letter at the time. I was a STARLOG reader from Issue One in 1976 (still have it), and like Lukas said, STARLOG was very important back then. Not only for sci-fi, but for film music as well.

Those full-page ads for Varese LPs were great. And there were good, long articles about film music from the beginning.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2009 - 11:33 AM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

Was cool to see Lukas' letter. It's always fun to look back on things you wrote when you were younger.

I never really read Starlog much until about 1993/94, my freshman year in high school, when I found it among the magazine rack of my school library. Every month I'd go in to read the latest issue and would then pick up my own copy if I liked enough of what I read. Always had good, long articles, and I enjoyed the book recommendations and movie reviews. Haven't read it much in recent years, though.

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2009 - 6:04 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


I chronicled my run-ins with Maestro Goldsmith in FSM Vol 9 No 7 which is available to download as a pdf for FSM Online members; see the backissue archive.

Lukas

 
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