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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Twilight Zone: The Movie
 
 Posted:   Apr 29, 2009 - 8:35 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

Spectacular sounding release and one of my remaining 5 or 6 holy grails now delivered. In addition to the wonderfully remixed and remastered sound, the inclusion of the complete original score is more than I could have hoped for. A standout for me is the harp cue "Harp and Love" from the Kick the Can segment, absolutely beautiful. If you're a Goldsmith fan, don't miss out on this one. Bravo FSM!

 
 Posted:   Apr 29, 2009 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

In a sense you get 4 scores for the price of one, each one equally interesting. It amazes me how the writing on Spielberg's episode "Kick the can" is in the same vein as something Williams would have produced. It's a prime example of what Henry Mancini called "Goldsmith's chameleon adaptability" as he shifts from one style to another for every segment in this movie.

I'm not the biggest fan of his television work for the Twilight Zone, which was fresh at the time, but now sounds stale and outdated. This 80's score however would be a blessing to any director today.

I said it before and I'll say it again, kudos on this release, especially the liner notes which are a delight to read.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 29, 2009 - 9:16 AM   
 By:   ScottDS   (Member)

I purchased the Japanese CD on eBay last summer but, had I known this was coming, I would've waited! I enjoy this score and, for some odd reason, I keep coming back to the "Time Out" cues. The accident overshadows everything but it would be nice to get Landis' reaction to Goldsmith's work one day.

(If the filmmakers could choose their own composers, "Time Out" probably would have been scored by Elmer Bernstein.)

 
 Posted:   Apr 29, 2009 - 3:33 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

I'm not the biggest fan of his television work for the Twilight Zone, which was fresh at the time, but now sounds stale and outdated.

Boy, I can't agree with you there. I would love to hear more scores with the precision, inventiveness, and economy of Goldsmith's television "Twilight Zone" scores in this or any other decade. Don't get me wrong -- I love the grander "The Movie" score, too, which has all those qualities but on a larger scale. Don't make me choose!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 29, 2009 - 11:57 PM   
 By:   12-tone   (Member)

This is probably the best Goldsmith album you can get this year (at least so far), and I've been sticking to it for a whole week.

The sound on this release, in my opinino, is superior to the Warner Germany release, though sometimes the LP arrangement delivers a better listening experience. (Hey, don't forget that this FSM release is designed carefully, so you can programme it as the 1983 album. )

However, there is one thing I don't like on the original LP programme - ends the piece with Constant's Twilight Zone theme.(No offence to the theme itself. In fact, I even enjoy this theme to Jerry's score to Segement 1) It should be left out as a single cue to finish the album, in my opinion. (Hey, but who cares? We are given the complete score, aren't we?) So, a really fair reason to own it, isn't it?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2009 - 12:35 AM   
 By:   CuestaVerde   (Member)

Still waiting on mine to get here. SAE has never taken this long to deliver...sigh.

 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2009 - 12:41 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)


Boy, I can't agree with you there. I would love to hear more scores with the precision, inventiveness, and economy of Goldsmith's television "Twilight Zone" scores in this or any other decade. Don't get me wrong -- I love the grander "The Movie" score, too, which has all those qualities but on a larger scale. Don't make me choose!


Well for me it's an obvious choice as I have the isolated material on the dvd release and the silva screen release and I rarely listen to them. I know this show is a holy grail to many people but I never got into it, save for the 80's version which I prefer over the older.

So for me the TZ FSM album is the best to come out of that show.

 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2009 - 8:08 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

Got this yesterday and listened to it today.

MAGNIFICENT. big grin

One absurdly tiny niggle, though...the first cue in the "Time Out" segment is listed as being about 50 seconds longer than it actually is (odd, because FSM doesn't usually make these kind of timing mistakes, unlike Varese, which does this constnatly).

Other than this, the CD is superbly produced, with top-notch sound and liner notes.

 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2009 - 12:02 PM   
 By:   Zambra Alex   (Member)

Superb reissue.
Probably the best of the year so far.
What sound! Great notes!
A big thank you!!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2009 - 12:28 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

For me, the packaging for this CD makes it worth buying. The booklet is fantastic (as are all FSM booklets). I prefer Time Out and It's A Good Life as they were on the original issue, but Kick The Can and Nightmare.. are standouts and the extra stuff is just the icing in the cake.
Goldsmith got a bit of stick in the past for some of his album arrangements and for leaving off some great cues for less interesting material, but he produced a fantastic set with the original LP and subsequent CD.
There are other Goldsmith scores I would have chosen for expansion before this one, but now I have it, I'm more than happy with it.
Keep 'em comin' Lukas! (Jeremiah ?? please)

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2011 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

I've been soaking this up for the last 3 days. Seeing the film on it's initial theatrical release (at the Odeon, Leicester Square late night show) then maybe a couple of times on TV and video over a number of years left me with a pretty good impression of the main themes. I really wanted that TZ theme in clear and crisp sound (Jerry put alot of effort into getting that deceptively simple intro just right.) The other piece of music was the end title roll which always had something grand about it. Having the CD means that not only do I have those main themes, but everything in-between as well. The mix is a unique, sympathetically tuneful Goldsmith listening experience quite unlike anything else I can think of that he composed.

The detailed liner notes provide quite alot of information that emphasize some important historic aspects to the scoring. The input provided by Bruce Botnick was an interesting read. One noteworthy aspect is the way synths were blended in organically with the orchestra, so Jerry could have complete control over the way he wanted the music to sound, along with some of the problems inherent in the arrangement. Bruce describes the microphone placement strategy and other things besides. For once I actually tried to envisage all these technically involved soundstage aspects and how they fuse together.

My favourite segment is Nightmare At 20,000 Feet. Larry Cedar's gremlin and the Don Quixote performace by John Lithgow made for an unforgettable combination. Together with Jerry's music the result is dazzling film magic. Track 18, Hungry Monster/Engine Failure is ace. The signature motif for the gremlin, an agitated fiddle, is cleverness and subtlety incarnate. That motif was apparent the very first time I saw the film so I never could forget it. The gremlin admonishing Valentine is one of THE iconic moments in cinema IMHO.

The rest of the score has it's moments. Time Out is darkly reflective with notable synth, percussion and piano playing. I particularly like track 3, The KKK, Yellow Star with mixed drumbeat and bell chimes. Kick The Can provides the unforgettable upbeat, soaring sound that is inseperable from the TZ project and is perhaps its most strongly identifying feature. The other theme associated with TZ is from It's A Good Life and is a joy to hear with it's perfect balance of synth and orchestra. Cartoon Monster is a literal hoot - love it.

The additional and alternate cues are prolific. Indeed, they alone could have constituted the complete listening experience for Twilight Zone: The Movie. Squeezing them all onto the disc provides true value, and not just for money. They simply complement the whole in the best of artistic and technical ensembles possible. The two songs from Time Out are there too. 'Anesthesia' is sung by Joseph Williams, son of maestro Williams.

FSM has produced one hell of a fantastic CD for this score. This is how film scores were meant to be.

 
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