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This is a comments thread about Blog Post: The Single Most FAQ: How to Become a Film Composer by Lukas Kendall
 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2009 - 8:33 PM   
 By:   nelson   (Member)

Wow I feel very confident about this blog...the only thing I disagree with is the statement, "16 year olds do not know what they want to do". I happen to be 16 and I am one of the only people I know that aspire to be a composer...It has always been my dream to either hear my compositions in a movie or on the radio. I went to the Orange County School of the Arts (OCHSA) for over 3 years for piano. I literally fell in love with music theory, I find myself to be very good at it and have a natural taste for it. USC used to be my dream school as it also my fathers alma mater, but I have been more interested in Berklee school of music. If you take interest in this comment I would love an e-mail for further guidelines to follow. I've switched schools almost every two years and I make friends with the majority of people so I believe that networking will be an easy task when I get older. I'm also positive that I will eventually build strong relations with people of musical power, and if you could possibly help with my progress please by all means feel free to introduce my name to powerful musical composers. My name is nelson and my e-mail is taztrexx@yahoo.com

 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2009 - 8:41 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Welcome to the FSM board, nelson. I admire your confidence and drive, and wish you the best in your artistic and professional endeavors.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2010 - 6:36 AM   
 By:   contracowboy   (Member)

This is a very helpful blog, thanks. I do think, speaking as a musician, that it is probably not reasonable to think that all the great musicians are in music school, nor are all the great potential filmmakers in film school. John Coltrane didn't go to music school and Miles Davis lasted about five minutes at Julliard before he realized that it was too inhibiting for him. The "jazz" that exists as jazz in the jazz schools on college campuses has absolutely zero passion, you might as well put it over with the science requirements. Universities in general have a tendency to want to "standardize" people into boxes. Kids go to college and take classes to pass the time and take classes not because they have any real passion but because they don't know what else to do.

I'm certain that only a very small percentage of the kids in the film departments throughout the country have any real talent, and they have their talent regardless of anything they're learning in school. I'm not saying that a film department has nothing to provide, but academics should be under no illusion that the best students are in their class because of some ridiculous SAT test, or because they were able to afford the tuition. Conversely, talented students that happen to be there studying film should be under no illusion that they are going to be great filmmakers because of some course of study. Colleges are businesses and there will never come a day when all great art is produced within the walls of a university. Innovation by its very nature is not the product of an institution. It's essence is a little more eternal.

So I would say to that 16 year old young man who has always wanted to be a great filmmaker, that you will be a great filmmaker whether you go to film school or not. It's in you and that's a rare commodity and don't let anyone any institution rob you of your passion.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2010 - 7:48 AM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)

I advise people to stay in school or go to school because I think it's responsible. I think it's far more likely that people would later lose interest in music professionally, or not make it and need something to fall back on, as oppose to turn out to be a genius like Coltrane or Miles who might be stifled by an academic environment. Really: these are people's lives and while I am hesitant to give them any advice at all, it might as well be responsible advice.

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2010 - 8:17 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

I think it's hard to make money out of any kind of music these days, let alone make a living. I think Lukas is right, get the best education you can, & do it as a hobby, & see what pans out.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2010 - 8:42 AM   
 By:   guest   (Member)




I agree with Lukas, go to school and have something to fall back on in case you change your mind or things don't go the way you had planned or hoped.

There are plenty of established composers who have a hard time getting work for whatever reasons.


 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2012 - 8:43 PM   
 By:   happyperson123   (Member)

Wow I feel very confident about this blog...the only thing I disagree with is the statement, "16 year olds do not know what they want to do". I happen to be 16 and I am one of the only people I know that aspire to be a composer...It has always been my dream to either hear my compositions in a movie or on the radio. I went to the Orange County School of the Arts (OCHSA) for over 3 years for piano. I literally fell in love with music theory, I find myself to be very good at it and have a natural taste for it. USC used to be my dream school as it also my fathers alma mater, but I have been more interested in Berklee school of music. If you take interest in this comment I would love an e-mail for further guidelines to follow. I've switched schools almost every two years and I make friends with the majority of people so I believe that networking will be an easy task when I get older. I'm also positive that I will eventually build strong relations with people of musical power, and if you could possibly help with my progress please by all means feel free to introduce my name to powerful musical composers. My name is nelson and my e-mail is taztrexx@yahoo.com

Good for you! I know exactly how you feel-- I am 15 and I aspire to become a soundtrack composer-- music is so incredible and I think that it really enhances a movie. Good luck!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2012 - 8:59 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Go with your dream , young man, don't let anybody tell you otherwise , they don't really know you, only you know you,if you really love something go for it, because if you make it you will spend your life doing something to make a living you love and that is one of the most happiest thing you can do in life, besides finding a great mate or kids etc etc.never listen to people who don't have dreams, they will always try to destroy or keep you away from your dreams, look to people who have dreams, if they are honest they will tell you even though there are tough roads one will go down along with the great ones, it is the very core of your existence, i always loved the lyrics from Ruby tuesday, lose your dreams and you will lose your mind, HOW TRUE.GOOD LUCK, REMEMBER IF YOU FALL, JUMP RIGHT BACK UP, IT IS ALL PART OF LIFE, A DREAM MUST HAVE IT'S REALISTIC ASPECTS, THERE WILL BE MUCH PAIN BUT MUCH PLEASURE AND A POSSIBLE GLORY.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2012 - 10:10 AM   
 By:   dashrr   (Member)

Remember

Charles Ives was also an accountant

Jerry Goldsmith was basically a secretary at one time (or writers assistant)

I thought I heard one time that Benny Herrmann made monocles in his dads eye shop

Rozsa, Raksin and Bernstein were all teachers


anyway you get the picture

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 28, 2012 - 2:09 AM   
 By:   Dominic23   (Member)

Message received; I am 51 and I am only now planning a career change into music scoring, which could be total mandess but at 51 you can be 16 again, I reckon! I think the article was realistic if a tad old-gashioned; social networking is important, so also is a youtube channel; of course, ideally you should not upload your fim score effort over a copyrighted film clip, I know a very good composer who created her own spacey trippy videos to accompany her music, built a large following on youtube by airing her excellent sci-fi soundscapes for free, and she is now working ... you never know who might be watching your channel!
The latest wisdom is to gain a following on iTunes or youtube - the same as getting your first novel on lulu.com - and then building a following online, which can convince publishers of your worth.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2012 - 2:21 PM   
 By:   skyy38   (Member)

I advise people to stay in school or go to school because I think it's responsible. I think it's far more likely that people would later lose interest in music professionally, or not make it and need something to fall back on, as oppose to turn out to be a genius like Coltrane or Miles who might be stifled by an academic environment. Really: these are people's lives and while I am hesitant to give them any advice at all, it might as well be responsible advice.

Lukas


Sticking with school and increasing your education is ALWAYS responsible advice. Have a strong minor to go with your major because a lot of people in the arts have more than *one* arrow in their quiver.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2014 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   10stephr   (Member)

Hi, I'm 14 years old (I'm aware that may be read and then whoever is reading it will just carry on scrolling), but I've always wanted to compose music for films. Reading this blog completed me and confirmed in my head that this is all I ever wanted to do. Coincidentally, I am also completely obsessed by Los Angeles, ever since I visited when I was 10 it has been my dream to go there, just to have a life and find myself, even if it doesn't work, I just want to try, to experience it. And I'm completely crazy, besotted by films, I rent one every week to watch and have so many favourites, I get that after-film feeling, you know when you're still in the film, you never go back to reality? I'm constantly listening to the soundtracks and every. single. time there's a wave of emotions that I can't describe. It's mad, and I'm obsessed.
Thing is (and I'm sorry, I've apparently written more than expected), I play the piano and I mess about and I string a few notes together and there it is. It's perfect, i love it, but it's mostly about 16 bars long, and then it stops. I have the ideas but I don't know how to develop them, into a real film score.
I know it's a lot to ask from a 14 year old, but I can't think what I'd do if i weren't to film compose.
Oh and I'm a girl, I just thought I'd add that.

 
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