Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2010 - 1:15 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Leonard Rosenman was a pupil of Roger Sessions here in the States, and also of Luigi Dallapiccola in Italy.
Are there any Rosenman followers here that have explored any of the compositions of these modern masters?

Luigi Dallapiccola has quite a catalogue of vocal music, such as the "Canti di Prigionia" and "Ulisse", an opera. Plus, Dallapiccola has much chamber works recorded, too, like his "2 Studies for Violin and Piano". Has anyone heard his "Variazioni for Orchestra"? I'm rather fond of the orchestral "3 Questions with 2 Answers".

Like Luigi, recordings of music by Roger Sessions are not frequently encountered. We should be thankful that some of Session's orchestral compositions have been released on CD: both a "Concerto" and a "Rhapsody" for orchestra are available, as is his "Concerto for Piano". Of all of Roger Session's symphonies, Nos. 4,5,6,7, & 9 are (have been at one time) available for exploration. Are there any other soundtrack collectors besides myself who own any of these concert works?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2010 - 1:33 PM   
 By:   The Man-Eating Cow   (Member)

I have a few CD's of Roger Sessions' music, including some solo piano works. A lot of people find his music "difficult", an assessment I find difficult to understand. I've always found his music to have an emotional and intellectual clarity to it, but then, I am a pointy-headed music geek, so what do I know?

Naxos was supposed to have issued a few discs of Sessions' music on their "American Classics" series, but they've yet to be issued. (A few discs in this series, by the way, are conducted by William Stromberg; two Ferde Grofe discs, and a wonderful, wonderful CD of two symphonies composed by Meredith Willson.)

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2013 - 2:27 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

*bump*

adding a couple of YouTube clips.

"Rhapsody for Orchestra" by Roger Sessions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRHPHNGMJKQ&feature=player_detailpage

Luigi Dallapiccola's Three Questions with Two Answers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gN5r6Mmdwv0&feature=player_detailpage

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2013 - 3:03 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Very interesting, Toney. Cheers!

The music has 'continuity' in a strictly 'mathematical' sense, however, it is imbued with quantum-like fluctuations which could be interpreted as discontinuities by some, while others would say no, the oscillations are more energetic in some places than others, but continuity is constant throughout the domain.

I can't put it any other way smile

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2013 - 2:56 PM   
 By:   musicalpyramid   (Member)

*bump*

adding a couple of YouTube clips.

"Rhapsody for Orchestra" by Roger Sessions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRHPHNGMJKQ&feature=player_detailpage

Luigi Dallapiccola's Three Questions with Two Answers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gN5r6Mmdwv0&feature=player_detailpage


Both of those pieces have a Rosenman quality to them - though I appreciate it is of course the other way around, being that they predate his work - but what I mean is that I could hear something of Rebel without a Cause, something of Beneath the Planet of the Apes etc, especially in the Dallapiccola piece. In a way it adds a new dimension to the Rosenman canon seeing it more as part of an existing evolution in music rather than seeing it in isolation.

Despite being a Rosenman fan I've never explored the works of his teachers but I find both these pieces emotionally engaging and intelectually interesting, which is exactly how I would describe how I find Leonard Rosenman's music too.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.