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 Posted:   Jun 14, 2010 - 3:30 PM   
 By:   Joe Brausam   (Member)

I just listened to this score for the first time today, I enjoyed it quite a bit! It's nice to hear Bernstein in the Demille "epic" mode. In TTC he sounded a bit uncomfortable with it, but this time around he seemed to have a strong grasp of what he was doing.

Unfortunately the sound on the DRG album is pretty terrible, it sounds like it was transferred directly from the LP. Is there a reason why we haven't seen this score expanded and released by one of the labels? It would be a shame if the tapes are lost or too damaged, I would definitely like to hear more of it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2010 - 3:49 PM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

Well, it's Paramount, and for a long time, scores from their archives were unreachable.

(There was a b**t floating around, with additional music.

Even now, it's doubtful this score is on any producer's list, since they're paying far more attention to scores from the 70's and 80's.

So it's still just as unreachable as ever.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2010 - 3:58 PM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)


The sound was never a great thrill on this track - recorded in Mexico during the musicians strike.

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2010 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)

The sound was never a great thrill on this track - recorded in Mexico during the musicians strike.

It's a score that could use a decent rerecording. Are you listening Tadlow and Tribute? smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2010 - 7:07 PM   
 By:   Bob Bryden   (Member)

I have mono and stereo versions of the original vinyl, plus both the original Varese CD and the DRG CD, plus the version(s) mentioned, plus the old laserdisc which has an isolated music/FX track. I a/b'd the Varese with the DRG CD's in synch and the Varese is probably an overall 'nicer' sound than the more strident DRG. The Varese is quite 'warm' come to think of it. Bernstein's album really does contain the score's real highlights - unless there are unused cues and/or alternates, etc. extant. It was fun to make my own 'version' combining all of the above. It's a great score and in my top five Elmer's.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 3:55 AM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)


I produced the buccaneer Laserdisc, I can assure you it was an isolated music track, not a music/fx track

Joe C

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 10:27 AM   
 By:   James MacMillan   (Member)

The sound was never a great thrill on this track - recorded in Mexico during the musicians strike.


Here we go again. Joe, all the evidence points to the fact that The Buccanner was recorded in Munich during the musicians' strike and conducted by Kurt Graunke. Bernstein himself told me this when I asked him about it in Glasgow.

There's also - as I've said before - the Q & A session from an SPFM seminar where he says himself that "...they took the recording to Munich and as a loyal union member I didn't conduct". I have this SPFM session recorded on a CDR and, as I've offered in the past, if you give me your address I'll send a copy to you.

Furthermore, a friend in Germany recently furnished me with several pages from a book chronicling the history of the Graunke Orchester Munich. Included is a huge list of films that they recorded over the years. The credit "Konig der Friebeuter (The Buccaneer)" is listed twice
along with Elmer Bernstein's name.

- James MacMillan.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 10:33 AM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

Well is that all the evidence you can provide? smile

I certainly wish Elmer had turned out more scores in a style he was "uncomfortable" with like The Ten Commandments, one of my all time favorite movie scores...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 10:46 AM   
 By:   James MacMillan   (Member)

Well is that all the evidence you can provide? smile

I certainly wish Elmer had turned out more scores in a style he was "uncomfortable" with like The Ten Commandments, one of my all time favorite movie scores...



Well, actually there IS more. In an interview published in the Belgian magazine Soundtrack!,
old Matthias Budinger starts off by asking Bernstein, "This is not the first time you've been to Munich, is it?"

And Elmer replies, "That's correct; I was here before, just once, for The Buccaneer in 1958".

(Matthias' interview took place when Bernstein was scoring Spies Like Us).

- JMM.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 12:09 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Here's a quick clip of Elmer talking about 'The Buccaneer' at the SPFM seminar: he does mention Munich:


[URL=http://www.4shared.com/audio/05RiObKv/EB_Buccaneer_chat.html]EB Buccaneer chat.mp3[/URL]

The hilarity suggests it wasn't one of his favourites. Elmer's music is never 'bad' but he did hit uncharacteristic level of corn in this one. Still a fun listen though.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 12:46 PM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)


Here we go agaqin - indeed. Elmer told me this was done in mexico.

indeed the raw sessions tapes have the slates and conversation with musicians in Spanish.
Is that normal with the Graunke Orchestra?

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 12:49 PM   
 By:   msmith   (Member)

I produced the buccaneer Laserdisc, I can assure you it was an isolated music track, not a music/fx track

Joe C


I can definately vouch for this since I still have my laserdisc.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 4:09 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

The hilarity suggests it wasn't one of his favourites. Elmer's music is never 'bad' but he did hit uncharacteristic level of corn in this one. Still a fun listen though.

To be honest I prefer the romantic "corn" of The Buccaneer to the reserved subtlety of a lot of his more acclaimed scores. I love Elmer's work, but I find some of his music austere and overly serious. I wish he'd scored more old fashioned adventures.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 4:59 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

Here we go agaqin - indeed. Elmer told me this was done in mexico.

indeed the raw sessions tapes have the slates and conversation with musicians in Spanish.
Is that normal with the Graunke Orchestra?


Looks like a Mexican stand-off...

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 5:05 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Here we go agaqin - indeed. Elmer told me this was done in mexico.

indeed the raw sessions tapes have the slates and conversation with musicians in Spanish.
Is that normal with the Graunke Orchestra?


Looks like a Mexican stand-off...


As always, terribly amusing to behold as it unfolds.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2010 - 6:45 PM   
 By:   Bob Bryden   (Member)

Of course you're right - it's a music track - it's been a good 10 years since I put that together. Also, I recalled that the levels were so 'all over the map' on the track (corresponding to the varying mixed volume levels in the overall soundtrack) that I may have mistakenly thought it was because of SFX. Anyway - GREAT SCORE IN ANY LANGUAGE!!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2014 - 3:48 PM   
 By:   JSDouglas   (Member)

While there are quite a few threads discussing Elmer Bernstein's THE BUCCANEER, I resurrected this one because of the interesting audio link from WILLIAMDMCCRUM that highlights Bernstein speaking of the score to a SPFM seminar. He seems taken aback that someone likes this score so much - but the score is indeed a gorgeous one.

After living awhile with the Varese Sarabande re-issue of the original LP on CD, I grew ever more comfortable with this score. It seemed to be less about action & battle and more about romance and drama with lots of source pieces mixed in.

Kritzerland came along with their expanded edition and knocked the old album on its ear. A beautiful presentation of this music which finds Elmer Bernstein in perfect golden-age mode. Victor Young or Max Steiner would seem to be the models for Berstein's style here.

The new CD finds some wonderful new variations not previously included as well as a load of Bernstein source material (for an example of a masterful bit of Bernstein throwaway that is NOT to be thrown away, check out the delicate "Vulcan Music Box"). Bonus tracks abound with curious piano demos that apparently did not fly with DeMille and his producers. The notation of the "Lovers' Gold" song derived from the love theme made me curious to hear how Mack David's lyrics sounded with the piece.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2014 - 4:22 PM   
 By:   cdelelee   (Member)

Yes, it's a gorgeous score. Kritzerland does a great job resurrecting Golden Age music. Too bad the booklets of heir CDs look so amateurish, because the covers and back covers are great.

 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2014 - 5:22 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

Yes, it's a gorgeous score. Kritzerland does a great job resurrecting Golden Age music. Too bad the booklets of heir CDs look so amateurish, because the covers and back covers are great.

There's nothing "too bad" about this or any of the other Kritzerland releases, many of which (like THE BUCCANEER) offer first-time expanded cues, demos and vastly improved sound compared to what has historically been available. Why is it that there's always a "too bad" coming forth here, when a simple "thank you" to Mr. K for the effort, care and concern he has invested in everything he's done would suffice.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2014 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   cdelelee   (Member)

I thank Bruce K. buying his releases, but if I think the booklets can be improved, I can say it, no ? Do we have to praise EVERYTHING without ANY constructive criticism ? Come on, give ma a break...
Kritzerland releases are great, no question about it, and I suppose they prefer to put more money on the music than on the booklets. But LLL or INtrada releases have great Booklets. So why not Kriterland ?
May be Mr. K. can answer.

 
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