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 Posted:   Jul 14, 2010 - 9:03 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

All very interesting and helpful, William. Thanks.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2010 - 10:06 PM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

Be that as it may, I tend to avoid UK terrestrial television in general, including the BBC.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 3:04 AM   
 By:   The Jazz Slinger   (Member)

Spock does a flamingo dance around Kirk's head, sings a bad song, and weeps. Both he and Kirk have to wear mini-length togas with no pants. It's pretty bad.

Flamingo dance? Was it photographed using a crane shot? Was the show's name changed to Stork Trek?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 3:10 AM   
 By:   The Jazz Slinger   (Member)

It's amazing what arbitrary criteria one authority will employ to censor the work of another; the objections the BBC cited are ludicrous, especially in light of an episode of MI5 (Spooks) I saw a couple of years ago in which a young woman's face is actually shoved into a deep-fryer (never shown graphically, but the implication was only too clear; it remains the single most horrific and disturbing thing I've ever seen on TV, irrespective of its source).

 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 5:47 AM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)

It's amazing what arbitrary criteria one authority will employ to censor the work of another; the objections the BBC cited are ludicrous, especially in light of an episode of MI5 (Spooks) I saw a couple of years ago in which a young woman's face is actually shoved into a deep-fryer (never shown graphically, but the implication was only too clear; it remains the single most horrific and disturbing thing I've ever seen on TV, irrespective of its source).

The episode in question is Looking After Our Own, and is the second episode from series 1 of Spooks (MI5).

Wolstencroft, wrote the death scene, with the intention of giving the audience the impression that no one in the series is safe.[6] Matthew Macfadyen stated that during the shooting of the death scene, although not emotionally draining, it was rather tough, and gruelling to perform. The part where Osbourne forces Flynn's arm into the fryer was done with a rubber arm made to double Faulkner's arm. Furthermore the "oil" was in fact cold tea with food colour. Episode director Bharat Nalluri wanted as little of the torture to be seen as possible, because he wanted the sequence to be more psychological to make it easier to frighten the audience, since they know the physicality of being burnt, where as if Helen was shot, not as many would.

"I really wanted to make sure that the audience got the message that the world of Spooks isn't the world where the cavalry always arrive, because in reality these people [MI5] do risk their lives on our behalf and they do get into sticky situations with genuinely nasty people." ”
——David Wolstencroft

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Looking_After_Our_Own

 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 6:06 AM   
 By:   Heath   (Member)

Although it should be said that Spooks bears as much resemblance to the real-life (exceptionally dreary) goings on of MI5 as Starsky And Hutch did to the lives and times of the LAPD.

 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 10:45 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

It's amazing what arbitrary criteria one authority will employ to censor the work of another; the objections the BBC cited are ludicrous, especially in light of an episode of MI5 (Spooks) I saw a couple of years ago in which a young woman's face is actually shoved into a deep-fryer (never shown graphically, but the implication was only too clear; it remains the single most horrific and disturbing thing I've ever seen on TV, irrespective of its source).



No comparison. Firstly, the 'Spooks' was after the 9.00 o'clock watershed, and secondly, it's 30 years later than 'Star Trek'! Thirdly, 'Spooks' is not a show that would be expected to generate a big child audience.

If you really want downright evil laxity in censorship, YouTube is your bet. In the past, even serial killer videos (taken by the murderers themselves) have turned up there, and it's a dickens of a job getting them to grow up beyond the 'all censorship is bad' tedium.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 18, 2014 - 3:57 PM   
 By:   phelings   (Member)

I'm 4 years late but never mind.
The BBC first showed TOS part of the year every year from 1969 to 1981 .
When first shown it was a summer replacement for Dr Who which for the first year ever took a summer break so it was aired around 5.15 on saturdays and that run seemed to go without a hitch. The show proved popular so the BBC moved it to a weekday early evening slot around 7pm.

In December 1970 they aired MIRI and this drew complaints so the BBC began to vet the show from then on.
2 weeks later the Radio Times billed The Empath for broadcast but it got cancelled.
Subsequently Whom Gods Destroy and Platos Stepchildren were both banned due to some of the sadistic content . I think the fact both were dire rubbish didn't come into it.
The Empath was clearly banned as much of the episode was based around torture. Even today the logic behind the story is utter drivel and while it contains some interesting elements the story really is very weak.

These 4 episodes didn't appear on the BBC again until the early 90's.
Several other episodes got cut like The Man Trap , Patterns of Force , Bread and Circuses , A Private Little War and so on . But the majority of edits to the other episodes seem to be purely for timing in order to fit a shorter slot - something that was actually unheard of at the BBC at the time.

Unfortunately these poorly edited episodes had the film prints physically edited so these versions prevailed on the BBC until the late 80's as the dimwits didn't keep the cuts.

In the late 80's the BBC purchased the whole Trek canon of the time . TOS , the first 3 seasons of TNG , the films and the cartoons . While BBC aired TNG they sub licenced the satellite rights for TOS to Sky One . Unfortunately the BBC didn't yet have their new copies of TOS so Sky One had to air the bad edits although they did then very quietly become the channel that aired the 3 banned season 3 episodes for the first time ever in the UK. It's unfortunate that it's equally believable that the BBC banned those 3 because they were shockingly poor .

They did ban The High Ground on TNG but the main problem was Conspiracy which suffered cuts to the gory bits. It was at a time when much of the audience was ready to accept something like TNG in a primetime 9pm slot where it could have played unedited but British broadcasters including the BBC still had the old mindset regarding sci fi being for geeks only and it took several years of pay tv airing US shows in prime slots for the BBC and ITV to wake up although C4 were already there but Star Trek was not a show for the 90's C4 audience .

Thankfully the days of those dreadful edited episodes with fans at the mercy of the BBC are long gone .

 
 Posted:   Aug 18, 2014 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

At least you all progressed. We still can't see neked boobies on television unless its an extra pay service.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 18, 2014 - 9:07 PM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

They did ban The High Ground on TNG but the main problem was Conspiracy which suffered cuts to the gory bits. It was at a time when much of the audience was ready to accept something like TNG in a primetime 9pm slot where it could have played unedited but British broadcasters including the BBC still had the old mindset regarding sci fi being for geeks only and it took several years of pay tv airing US shows in prime slots for the BBC and ITV to wake up although C4 were already there but Star Trek was not a show for the 90's C4 audience.

It's worth noting that (Star Trek: ) Enterprise is the only series in the family not to have been screened by the BBC - that went to Channel 4 (they've also shown the J.J. Abrams movie). How times have changed.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 19, 2014 - 12:35 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

At least you all progressed. We still can't see neked boobies on television unless its an extra pay service.

Hardly any nakedness on UK TV now, unlike the 70's. All boobs come via HBO these days.

I have now got the full set of Star Trek on Blu-ray, so this winter I'll start working my way through them.

 
 Posted:   Aug 19, 2014 - 3:12 PM   
 By:   Mike_J   (Member)



It's worth noting that (Star Trek: ) Enterprise is the only series in the family not to have been screened by the BBC - that went to Channel 4 (they've also shown the J.J. Abrams movie). How times have changed.


Did the Beeb show DS9? I don't recall that, although to be honest I hated DS9 anyway - I'd rather stick a cactus up my bum than endure the appalling acting of Sisko. Avery Brooks? Avery Bad actor.

 
 Posted:   Aug 19, 2014 - 3:20 PM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)



It's worth noting that (Star Trek: ) Enterprise is the only series in the family not to have been screened by the BBC - that went to Channel 4 (they've also shown the J.J. Abrams movie). How times have changed.


Did the Beeb show DS9? I don't recall that, although to be honest I hated DS9 anyway - I'd rather stick a cactus up my bum than endure the appalling acting of Sisko. Avery Brooks? Avery Bad actor.


Yes, they showed it, in their usual 6:00pm slot I believe. I heard he didn't want the part, it was his wife who 'persuaded' him to take the part, as it was regular work.

For me, it only took off once the Cardassian/Dominion storyline took off. I used to think it was good, but nowadays, find it rather dull, much preferring Voyager.

 
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