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 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 4:55 AM   
 By:   JB Fan   (Member)

Enough got it sufficiently to have blasted the title off LLL's shelves. It is listed in the OP section of the website.

So, I was right, when I ordered this one along with Naked Gun, Gotham Knight & Speed/Speed 2...
The package arrived last week, but still not listen this one. Quartet batch also arrived at same time, so I have to listen at least 11 albums (15 CDs) - but I'm happy with this BIG listening "duty"! wink

 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 10:50 AM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

If you didn't get it, you don't deserve it.

'Cause it's excellent on its face. Alex North is not for those who need their dramatics spoon-fed to them.

That's what STAR WARS--as excellent as it sometimes is--is for.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

I have the Southern Cross numbered CD, and it is a perfectly good version of the score to me.
North can be a challenging composer to listen to at length to me.

 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 11:00 AM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

I have the Southern Cross numbered CD, and it is a perfectly good version of the score to me.
North can be a challenging composer to listen to at length to me.


Ado, I must've missed meeting you at the Mondo JURASSIC PARK vinyl "listening party" (Really just a lineup for millennial vinyl-heads, no real classic John Williams fans).

But that SCSE doesn't hold a candle to the Mike Matessino remastered DRAGONSLAYER on La-La Land.

You will regret this oversight when a proper hi-def version of this movie comes out that integrates the cleaned-up music tracks, and you are left holding your head in your hands muttering "Why?...why!?".

 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

If you didn't get it, you don't deserve it.

'Cause it's excellent on its face. Alex North is not for those who need their dramatics spoon-fed to them.

That's what STAR WARS--as excellent as it sometimes is--is for.


I would say Williams understood how to score a scene. Nothing to do with spoon feeding.

 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 11:23 AM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

I would say Williams understood how to score a scene. Nothing to do with spoon feeding.

Was referring more to the overall package than the Williams scores.

Yet when the time for all subtlety has passed, and dazzling brute force is called for, no one has outdone John Williams.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2016 - 9:11 AM   
 By:   Ed C   (Member)

Despite the dismissive title, this thread has some good Dragonslayer discussion, so I'll just stick a link to my DS analysis post here smile

http://cuebycue.blogspot.com/2016/07/dragonslayer-north-1981.html

I have to admit, this was not a film I really liked, but I felt I needed a North score under my (blog) belt so this seemed like it had some real meat to it (so to speak). I really didn't like it all that much the first time through (or the 2nd), but the third time I started to hear the gears moving and the levers falling into place. I think with time, I could really get to love this score... Actually I really think this thing works much better as score without picture, than a score in the film. The retracking decisions were absolutely correct IMHO. Also a ballet would be pretty cool (of course I just saw Swan lake last week so everything is like a great ballet now...).

I should probably write about Spartacus next, but there's so much already written about that one...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2016 - 2:26 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

I have to admit, this was not a film I really liked, but I felt I needed a North score under my (blog) belt so this seemed like it had some real meat to it (so to speak). I really didn't like it all that much the first time through (or the 2nd), but the third time I started to hear the gears moving and the levers falling into place. I think with time, I could really get to love this score... Actually I really think this thing works much better as score without picture, than a score in the film. The retracking decisions were absolutely correct IMHO. Also a ballet would be pretty cool (of course I just saw Swan lake last week so everything is like a great ballet now...).

I should probably write about Spartacus next, but there's so much already written about that one...


Hi, Ed C.

I don't wish to derail this thread about Dragonslayer, but, since you wish to enrich your blog with film music by Alex North, here's my rankings on the discs of North I own up to around 2013 or thereabouts. A few North items I've gotten over the past 3 years haven't been rated yet by me (like Hot Spell on Kritzerland or the already-defunct Intrada CD containing Decision for Chemistry), but this list is quite comprehensive if I may say so:



FOUR NORTH STARS

1. Africa
2. Bad Seed, The
3. Miserables, Les
4. 2001
5. Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf?
6. Children's Hour, The
7. Outrage, The
8. Cleopatra
9. Dragonslayer
10. Agony And The Ecstasy, The
11. Spartacus
12. Death Of A Salesman
13. Wonderful Country
14. Sanctuary
15. Misfits, The
16. Pony Soldier
17. Long Hot Summer, The

THREE NORTH STARS

18. Hard Contract
19. Journey Into Fear
20. Sound And The Fury, The
21. Cheyenne Autumn
22. King And Four Queens, The
23. I'll Cry Tomorrow
24. Rose Tattoo, The
25. Streetcar Named Desire, A
26. Thirteenth Letter, The
27. Viva Zapata!
28. Devil's Brigade, The
29. Bite The Bullet
30. All Fall Down

TWO NORTH STARS

31. Dream Of Kings, A
32. Rainmaker, The
33. Shoes Of The Fisherman, The

ONE NORTH STAR

34. South Seas Adventure
35. Desiree
36. Racers, The
37. Somebody Killed Her Husband

When you have time, Ed C., you should visit inside my profile to look at all the composers' names I've listed within. Many of these are composers who've worked in 'art' films, international cinema + non-Hollywood productions (and as such relevant to your blog, I think). smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2016 - 3:13 PM   
 By:   Ed C   (Member)


Hi, Ed C.

I don't wish to derail this thread about Dragonslayer, but, since you wish to enrich your blog with film music by Alex North, here's my rankings on the discs of North I own up to around 2013 or thereabouts. A few North items I've gotten over the past 3 years haven't been rated yet by me (like Hot Spell on Kritzerland or the already-defunct Intrada CD containing Decision for Chemistry), but this list is quite comprehensive if I may say so:

When you have time, Ed C., you should visit inside my profile to look at all the composers' names I've listed within. Many of these are composers who've worked in 'art' films, international cinema + non-Hollywood productions (and as such relevant to your blog, I think). smile


Thanks ZardozSpeaks, I definitely appreciate your recommendations. Frankly I've had some trouble getting into North, though the 2 scores that I know well are Spartacus and the 2001 rejected score. North's stuff always hits me with that Respighi vibe (think Pines of...). Also there's a bit of Nielson as well in his brass writing. For this reason it seems like his music is well-suited to standalone listening, but not films (in my own obviously idiosyncratic opinion). The thing is, his music is TOO GOOD wink. Anyways, 2 out of 50 scores (or whaterver) is a totally unfair sample, so I will make a point of checking out more of what's in your list when I get a chance (I'm still working through the Morricone early 70's discography, and and so you see...it could be awhile!).

Honestly I wish there were 2 of me, there's so much great music to explore and write about. Yeah, I know there are many "art film" film composers I'm leaving out, I was on the verge of doing a Nino Rota score but got derailed. Hey at least my Japanese anime selection is pretty well-stocked smile. I have Zdenek Liška coming up, that's gotta be pretty non-Hollywood, but then I haven't even written one on Rozsa, Korngold or Giacchino yet....



 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2016 - 9:33 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

...though the 2 scores that I know well are Spartacus and the 2001 rejected score. Anyways, 2 out of 50 scores (or whaterver) is a totally unfair sample, so I will make a point of checking out more of what's in your list when I get a chance (I'm still working through the Morricone early 70's discography, and and so you see...it could be awhile!).

Honestly I wish there were 2 of me, there's so much great music to explore and write about. Yeah, I know there are many "art film" film composers I'm leaving out, I was on the verge of doing a Nino Rota score but got derailed. Hey at least my Japanese anime selection is pretty well-stocked smile. I have Zdenek Liška coming up, that's gotta be pretty non-Hollywood, but then I haven't even written one on Rozsa, Korngold or Giacchino yet....


You're welcome, Ed C.

In round numbers, 60 is around the # of film scores North wrote.
If you know Spartacus, then you also know a lot of Pony Soldier (even if you don't know that one yet smile). There's a significant # of cues heard within the 1952 Pony Soldier which got recycled by North into Spartacus 8 years later. Plus a body can purchase Pony Soldier for $14.99 from Varese in what appears to be a permanent price reduction/sale.
North recycled portions of 2001 into Shanks, The Shoes of the Fisherman, Hard Contract and ... you guessed it! ... Dragonslayer.
Cinema connoisseurs might want to check out the 1964 The Outrage because this is director Martin Ritt's revamping of the Kurosawa classic Rashomon.

As the filmography / discography on Morricone exceeds 400 titles, I think one may need to take respite from Morricone for a while (and in comparison 60 scores seems less daunting smile )

Have you covered Giovanni Fusco's music for Antonioni pictures?
I also recommend the Ingmar Bergman films Persona & Hour of the Wolf scored by Werle, plus Luis de Pablo's collaborations with director Carlos Saura.
Consider, also, the films by Joseph Losey (Dankworth, Bennett, Legrand, etc.), Frankenheimer (Rosenman, Amram, Bernstein, Goldsmith & Jarre), plus Vadim (Prodromides, Magne,) or Chabrol & Jansen ... and I could go on.

Which Zdenek Liška is on the menu? The 1969 The Cremator or The Shop on Main Street or Adrift or The Angel Levine ... or ... ?

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2016 - 11:41 AM   
 By:   Ed C   (Member)

ZardosSpeaks, I recently started listening to his score for "The Little Mermaid" (the film is on YouTube, thankfully!). It seems very entrancing. I also like Bruno Coulais' scores for animated works.

I really would love to do a full Morricone research project; as far as I know there is no devoted Morricone website which reviews every single score of his. However I will probably do my favorite composer, Bernard Herrmann, first. Of course the big obstacle is acquiring all these scores! Anyways, I will check out the films you mention, none of which I have seen yet. In the meantime I have a stack of CDs and films to work on staring me in the screen...

Hey, you obviously have a pretty far-ranging collection - you should do a review blog yourself (unless you already have one, in which case I'd love to check it out).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2016 - 1:56 PM   
 By:   Jim Cleveland   (Member)

I love this type of music, but I gotta admit that after listening to Dragonslayer, I got an image in my mind of at LEAST 2/3 of the musicians playing on this score having slit their wrists after they wrapped up the sessions! big grinbig grinbig grinbig grinbig grinbig grin

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2016 - 2:02 PM   
 By:   Lewis&Clark   (Member)

DRAGONSLAYER RULZ!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2016 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

ZardosSpeaks, I recently started listening to his score for "The Little Mermaid" (the film is on YouTube, thankfully!). It seems very entrancing.

Ah - that's MALÁ MORSKÁ VÍLA (1976)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2016 - 2:46 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

I really would love to do a full Morricone research project; as far as I know there is no devoted Morricone website which reviews every single score of his. However I will probably do my favorite composer, Bernard Herrmann, first. Of course the big obstacle is acquiring all these scores! Anyways, I will check out the films you mention, none of which I have seen yet. In the meantime I have a stack of CDs and films to work on staring me in the screen...


Yeah, I have no doubt there's stacks of stuff in front of you.
Don't want to contribute much more to your clutter, but I mentioned those titles in the prior posts since I thought they are relevant to some of your goals.

I've written a lot within past FSM threads and deposited a number of album reviews and composer and/or film appreciation threads here in FSM as well - but I do not (and probably will not) have any blog.

My suggestion is to simply do searches in these threads when you discover any composer or film which is 'new' to you - it's likely been discussed before.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2016 - 3:55 PM   
 By:   kirksworks   (Member)

Most of Alex North's music still sounds modern and contemporary to me, particularly Dragonslayer. It has epic qualities like Spartacus and Cleopatra, and perhaps it makes a trio. I know some think it doesn't fit the movie, and even the director didn't like the score, but North's music gives Dragonslayer a depth it wouldn't have had if it had gone the John Williams or James Horner route. Not that those composers wouldn't have provided something wonderful, but I think North's complex modern sound is something to be marveled by. He just has an edge all his own. I watched this film not too long ago, and it was the first time I'd seen it since the film came out. Though it still has weaknesses, I liked it a lot more this time, and North's score is extremely atmospheric.

 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2016 - 5:50 PM   
 By:   TominAtl   (Member)

I still remember watching the Academy Awards that year and seeing Liberace come out and play snippets of the Oscar nominated scores that year and hearing him play a few bars of Dragonslayer. Though none that year stood a chance of beating Chariots of Fire but still it came across as dark and thrilling.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2016 - 2:05 AM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

I love this type of music, but I gotta admit that after listening to Dragonslayer, I got an image in my mind of at LEAST 2/3 of the musicians playing on this score having slit their wrists after they wrapped up the sessions! big grinbig grinbig grinbig grinbig grinbig grin

I'm sure the same percentage of buyers slit theirs after listening to the recording. I almost crossed North off my Xmas list about that time. Fortunately I was reminded to listen to Spartacus again, and thus all was forgiven.

 
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