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 Posted:   Mar 17, 2011 - 3:37 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

THE OUTSIDER
Le Marginal
Morricone Action
#45


This series is inspired by a controversy thread where someone posited the idea that besides THE MISSION and some Sergio Leone westerns Ennio Morricone hasn't written anything great. Rather than making my usual comment that most of Morricone's great scores are from Italy and trying to get Americans to listen to them is like getting them to see movies with subtitles, I decided to take another tact. Since I am at an age where I will only be able to make my case a finite number of times I decided to turn this into a series presenting each great score one at a time, sort of like recordman.

If Morricone had made a "Dirty Harry" film this is what it would have been like. Ennio really has not done many Hollywood movies and the ones he did were usually associated with a director he had worked with or a particular project that crossed his path. But this big budgeted French follow-up to Jean-Paul Belmondo's international hit LE PROFESSIONNEL is as close to a Hollywood style film as he ever got. It probably also would be what Morricone's score to that one would have sounded like if Belmondo hadn't insisted on using "Chi Mai"( An amazing part of the world still thinks "Chi Mai" was written for that). You can tell how Hollywood it is by the inclusion of disco and pop songs but this time all but one were written by Morricone himself.







Jean-Paul Belmondo plays Commissaire Philippe Jordan whose main focus is the drug kingpin Sauveur Meccacci (Henry Silva). Harry...er, Phillippe doesn't play by the rules and not much makes sense here but who cares since you are basically here to watch him whoop on some ass. That doesn't do much for me but I can entertain myself via the Jackie Chan factor. Watching Belmondo doing some astounding stunts himself.

Besides putting that terrific main theme through all sorts of workouts there is a cool "Theme Classique", a percussive riff "Le Squat Des Antillais", A Disco piece "Dreamer" and "Don't Think Twice" the last two are performed by a group called Blizzard. The last song, a David Bowie take-off "Forecast" was written by Blizzard member Roger Crouch. This is as "pop" as Morricone ever got.
And though not quite as big as LE PROFESSIONNEL, this LP did sell very well in France in 1983.


#41 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=77020&forumID=1&archive=0
#42 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=77140&forumID=1&archive=0
#43 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=77199&forumID=1&archive=0
#44 http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=77318&forumID=1&archive=0

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2011 - 4:31 PM   
 By:   Bond1965   (Member)

This is one of my favorite Morricone scores. I just love this theme. It reminds me of what Sarde did for LE CHOC for some reason.

James

 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2011 - 6:13 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)



At last! THIS is the theme that took me to Il Maestro's throne. It's 1989. I'm in college at USC. A fellow student who was studying film scoring loved Morricone and gave me two early compilation CDs titled Film Music Volume 1 and 2. I was familiar with Morricone, of course, having seen many films with his music as a kid. But it was with Le Marginal that I became a Morricone junkie. I played that theme to death. DEATH I tell ya. My dorm roomie hated it. He was a Williams freak and couldn't stand Le Marginal. To him it was nothing more than repetitive musical spasms and thumps. We had many arguments over Williams vs. Morricone (and Spielberg vs. Hitchcock).

I couldn't get enough of Le Marginal, but I only had that one cue on the compilation. And after all these years, it was only 3 years ago that I located the expanded soundtrack, which has umpteen versions of that delicious, addictive theme that I can't get out of my blood. I am that special brand of scorophiliac who loves monothematic scores. Nothing pleases me more than a strong theme presented in multiple variations with different orchestration, tempo, everything (which reminds me, Henry, you should do Love Affair so I can gush over that one, another monothematic masterpiece). It is scores like Le Marginal that cement my admiration and my big fat insatiable appetite for Il Maestro.

 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2011 - 6:27 PM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

I'm impressed by Allardyce's enthusiasm.
So I won't dare post any critic about PROFESSIONE : POLIZIOTTO (I was going to... smile.
...AND my "thumbs down" just turned upside down to "thumbs up" smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 12:05 AM   
 By:   plindboe   (Member)

"Theme classique" is what I love most about this score. I've always considered it a kind of little sister to "Le vent, le cri". "Theme classique" doesn't vary as much as "Le vent, le cri" in orchestration, but it's every bit as catchy.

I used to love the main theme on compilations, but I must admit that I got a bit tired of it after getting the album. I can appreciate mono-thematic albums as well ("Love affair" for example) but given that the theme itself is rather simplistic and is repeated unchanged throughout the album it gets a bit much. It worked much better on compilations where they usually present a shortened 4-minute version of the main theme.

Peter smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 2:53 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I, too, am a little critcial of this one in the GDM expanded release ... that theme, as wonderful as it is, is presented just too many times. An example, I think, of the original album being a better listen than the full score. The CD sleeve does refer to it being a Collector's Edition! The pop songs are a waste of space but do serve one purpose ... at least they split the album up a little more.

I like to watch Jean-Paul Belmondo in his action films ... at least the few I've seen ... I enjoy his laid-back who cares? approach. You refer, Morricone, to the earlier film Le Professionnel but not the one which I recall reading was modelled on the Dirty Harry formula ... Peur Sur La Ville. When we were in Paris a while ago I purchased the DVD, limiting myself to just one from the collection. Next time we're in France (late May) I shall try to get both Le Professionnel and Le Marginal

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 3:04 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Cancel posting ...

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 12:08 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)



At last! THIS is the theme that took me to Il Maestro's throne. It's 1989. I'm in college at USC. A fellow student who was studying film scoring loved Morricone and gave me two early compilation CDs titled Film Music Volume 1 and 2. I was familiar with Morricone, of course, having seen many films with his music as a kid. But it was with Le Marginal that I became a Morricone junkie. I played that theme to death. DEATH I tell ya. My dorm roomie hated it. He was a Williams freak and couldn't stand Le Marginal. To him it was nothing more than repetitive musical spasms and thumps. We had many arguments over Williams vs. Morricone (and Spielberg vs. Hitchcock).

I couldn't get enough of Le Marginal, but I only had that one cue on the compilation. And after all these years, it was only 3 years ago that I located the expanded soundtrack, which has umpteen versions of that delicious, addictive theme that I can't get out of my blood. I am that special brand of scorophiliac who loves monothematic scores. Nothing pleases me more than a strong theme presented in multiple variations with different orchestration, tempo, everything (which reminds me, Henry, you should do Love Affair so I can gush over that one, another monothematic masterpiece). It is scores like Le Marginal that cement my admiration and my big fat insatiable appetite for Il Maestro.



Wow! I think you win the prize for enthusiasm for any of these themes. Thanks!

I kind of hate these composer vs. composer comparisons. For instance when he was young Williams seemed to be able to take chances as much as anybody, as in the Altman films, but tragedy and other elements made him turn down a more traditional path. Considering the position he was put in, he has done an exemplary job being the most popular film composer and still upholding the artistic aspects of his craft.

But back to Morricone who doesn't get the attention he desrves here in America. I may get to some American scores like LOVE AFFAIR eventually but my rules from the beginning of this series is to focus on Italian and other foreign films. They have zero exposure here and yet the music is better and more innovative than many an American composer.
I mean I easily could see this being the theme to some big splashy American action flick.

 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 12:15 PM   
 By:   Michael_McMahan   (Member)

I mean I easily could see this being the theme to some big splashy American action flick.

Like Goldsmith's "Extreme Prejudice"? The first time I heard the opening to Le Marginal I was struck by the similarity to the opening of Jerry's score...1st 2 notes of melody at least...

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 3:09 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I mean I easily could see this being the theme to some big splashy American action flick.

Like Goldsmith's "Extreme Prejudice"? The first time I heard the opening to Le Marginal I was struck by the similarity to the opening of Jerry's score...1st 2 notes of melody at least...


Well yeah a couple of notes. But Goldsmith's is more edgy, less Hollywood. As you can see from the trailer above the movie gets closer to a Bond film and has that feel.
A whole different animal for me.

BTW PREJUDICE would be the one with the similarity since THE OUTSIDER proceeds it by a few years.

 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 3:18 PM   
 By:   Michael_McMahan   (Member)

BTW PREJUDICE would be the one with the similarity since THE OUTSIDER proceeds it by a few years.



Of course! But I heard Extreme Prejudice first.

 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 4:31 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

Fascinating. I've listened to Extreme Prejudice for 20+ years and never put the connection together with Le Marginal. I recognize it now that it's been pointed out, but it would have never occurred to me. This is one of the fun aspects of getting the perspective of others on music!

 
 Posted:   Mar 18, 2011 - 9:09 PM   
 By:   Michael_McMahan   (Member)

Fascinating. I've listened to Extreme Prejudice for 20+ years and never put the connection together with Le Marginal. I recognize it now that it's been pointed out, but it would have never occurred to me. This is one of the fun aspects of getting the perspective of others on music!

Yeah, it is cool to get others' perspectives. However, in this case I have to give credit to Doug Fake for pointing it out to me back in 98.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 19, 2011 - 12:34 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Fascinating. I've listened to Extreme Prejudice for 20+ years and never put the connection together with Le Marginal. I recognize it now that it's been pointed out, but it would have never occurred to me. This is one of the fun aspects of getting the perspective of others on music!

Yeah, it is cool to get others' perspectives. However, in this case I have to give credit to Doug Fake for pointing it out to me back in 98.


Extreme Prejudice isn't one of my 70 or so Goldsmiths, and I've never seen the film, so I can't claim to have noticed any similarity. Listening to them now, there's a superficial similarity - as stated, the first couple of notes, and maybe the general background feel - but (and Goldsmith fans should stop reading now) Le Marginal is an interesting, engaging and exciting mix of orchestral "hits" and plaintive melody, whereas Extreme Prejudice is boringly dirge-like. My opinion only of course. I'd say any similarity is purely coincidental! There certainly isn't the striking resemblance that Carol-Anne's Theme (Poltergeist) bears to Barry's Love Among The Ruins, for example.

 
 Posted:   Mar 19, 2011 - 10:02 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

Le Marginal is an interesting, engaging and exciting mix of orchestral "hits" and plaintive melody, whereas Extreme Prejudice is boringly dirge-like.

I think exactly the opposite. I don't share your view but I can understand it. Extreme Prejudice is not loved by the majority of Goldsmith fans either.smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 19, 2011 - 11:33 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I really like the EXTREME PREJUDICE score. It was a style of composing that fit a Walter Hill film like a glove. But since few saw it more seem to like it when it was attached to subsequent films like TOTAL RECALL.
As I said above THE OUTSIDER was more Hollywood, much less bloody, almost tongue-in-cheek. More of a fun action film. Morricone did many more scores that were dirgelike and darker that would be very appropriate for PREJUDICE.

 
 Posted:   Mar 19, 2011 - 11:37 AM   
 By:   Michael_McMahan   (Member)

Listening to them now, there's a superficial similarity - as stated, the first couple of notes, and maybe the general background feel - but ...

I agree it's superficial and nothing more than coincidence. Just thought it was fun to point out. For the record, I love both scores.

 
 Posted:   Mar 19, 2011 - 1:52 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

I agree it's superficial and nothing more than coincidence. Just thought it was fun to point out. For the record, I love both scores.

Me, too. Extreme Prejudice is a Goldsmith fav for me, but I do understand why many don't care for it. All the more joy for me. I mean come on people, that trailer music is just infinitely awesome! Ah well. I like Mr. Baseball, too. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 20, 2011 - 1:11 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Le Marginal is an interesting, engaging and exciting mix of orchestral "hits" and plaintive melody, whereas Extreme Prejudice is boringly dirge-like.

I think exactly the opposite. I don't share your view but I can understand it. Extreme Prejudice is not loved by the majority of Goldsmith fans either.smile


Well, as far as I'm concerned you can stick your Extreme Prejudice in your CD player and enjoy it!

Chris

 
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