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 Posted:   May 30, 2011 - 9:32 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

A lot of the times, waltzes are utilized in historical movies to establish a certain period from anytime between the Napoleonic Era and World War I.
Other times, waltzes function as source music during formal dances, or brass marching bands.
In most cases, these are written in a very traditional Viennese/Straussian mold, and, when these waltzes are included onto soundtrack programs, I skip over them to move onward to the next cue.

Few exceptions exist wherein I'm entranced by a descriptive waltz to listen to it in its entirety.

Richard Rodney Bennett composed fluid and graceful symphonic waltzes in his scores for NICHOLAS AND ALEXANDRA and GORMENGHAST.
Jerry Fielding utilized waltz-like material in a very commentative manner in THE NIGHTCOMERS to depict emotional intensity via contrast.
Jerry Goldsmith's "Dress Waltz" from his rejected LEGEND score could very well serve as ballet music.
Another unexpectedly beautiful one can be heard in GOD'S LITTLE ACRE; Elmer Bernstein proved he is no slouch either by giving us an almost Ravel-like "Peachtree Valley Waltz".

Do you have any similar examples of these types of waltzes from among your favorite scores?

 
 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 2:18 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Not the biggest waltz fan either, but Zimmer has done some great ones in his power anthem style. Like GLADIATOR. He certainly get the most power out of the music form as possible. Probably not what you had in mind, though.

 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 3:23 AM   
 By:   Senojanaidni   (Member)

DID anyone hear the beautyfull waltz from DAVID ARNOLD'S STEPFORD'S WIFES?:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8yygOkG7qM&feature=related

 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 4:07 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Not the biggest waltz fan either, but Zimmer has done some great ones in his power anthem style. Like GLADIATOR. He certainly get the most power out of the music form as possible. Probably not what you had in mind, though.

Any sort of variation on the waltz form would be interesting, so long as it's not performed in the customary manner.

True, though, my thoughts were intially hovering about voluptuous interpretations of waltz rather than stately formal standard types.
Not sure that this power anthem style (with synths?) could be considered as impressionistic ... smile

 
 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 4:10 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Not the biggest waltz fan either, but Zimmer has done some great ones in his power anthem style. Like GLADIATOR. He certainly get the most power out of the music form as possible. Probably not what you had in mind, though.

Any sort of variation on the waltz form would be interesting, so long as it's not performed in the customary manner.

True, though, my thoughts were intially hovering about voluptuous interpretations of waltz rather than stately formal standard types.
Not sure that this power anthem style (with synths?) could be considered as impressionistic ... smile


Maybe not 'impressionistic' in the traditional sense. But they seem to use the waltz form only as a BASIS for a meter, and then go completely different directions from there; into prog rock and whatnot.

 
 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 4:10 AM   
 By:   Robert0320   (Member)

THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL Jerry Goldsmith

 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 4:32 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

DID anyone hear the beautyfull waltz from DAVID ARNOLD'S STEPFORD'S WIFES?:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8yygOkG7qM&feature=related


No I never heard it.

Thanks for sharing!

 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 4:35 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL Jerry Goldsmith

Goldsmith's main title waltz for THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL is very Germanic, to me.
I was never fond of it, though I realize this score is liked by many.

 
 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 6:38 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)


Maybe not 'impressionistic' in the traditional sense. But they seem to use the waltz form only as a BASIS for a meter, and then go completely different directions from there; into prog rock and whatnot.


Not everything in three has to be a waltz. Hell, I'd say Gladiator is probably closer to a mazurka, but I'd have to listen again to be sure.

 
 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 6:40 AM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

Andre Previn's "Waltz of the Fortune Cookies" from THE FORTUNE COOKIE
Elmer Bernstein's "Young Doctor's Waltz" from THE YOUNG DOCTORS
Bernard Herrmann's "Memory Waltz" from SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO
Miklos Rozsa's "Time Machine Waltz" from TIME AFTER TIME

Just to name a few.....

 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 6:41 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)



Williams conducting Rozsa's waltz from Madame Bovary.

Is it from a dancing scene? Yes. But... what is actually going on is pretty obvious to the viewer wink

 
 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 6:51 AM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

Also, Richard Rodney Bennett's main theme for "Murder on the Orient Express" is waltz-based, and its' most extended version is arguably impressionistic.

 
 
 Posted:   May 31, 2011 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

Also, Richard Rodney Bennett's main theme for "Murder on the Orient Express" is waltz-based, and its most extended version is arguably impressionistic.

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2014 - 8:33 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

*bumped for an update.

The recent Digitmovies CD of Riz Ortolani's DANZA MACABRA has an 1840s-type waltz as its central melody.




Ortolani's waltz theme is also used as the love theme.

The remainder of this score is 'spooky/haunted house' music, mostly strings and keyboards and percussion.

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2014 - 10:48 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

A lot of the times, waltzes are utilized in historical movies to establish a certain period from anytime between the Napoleonic Era and World War I.
Other times, waltzes function as source music during formal dances, or brass marching bands.
In most cases, these are written in a very traditional Viennese/Straussian mold, and, when these waltzes are included onto soundtrack programs, I skip over them to move onward to the next cue.

Few exceptions exist wherein I'm entranced by a descriptive waltz to listen to it in its entirety.


Do you have any similar examples of these types of waltzes from among your favorite scores?





I'm not sure if you're asking for symphonic waltzes that are in the formal mode, but nonetheless good in themselves, or waltzes that are slightly dissonant and modernistic, that break out of the cliched mode.

In 'The Blue Max' Goldsmith uses a waltz-time piano version of the main theme as his love theme.

Above was mentioned the 'Madame Bovary' waltz, which almost in places suggests Ravel's piece with the 'impressionism' layer stripped. Ravel's notes suggest the listener to 'La Valse' should imagine himself outside the window looking in at the dancers, only able to perceive a general FEEL of the actual waltz, which would, should one enter the hall, probably prove a Romantic conventional one. Rozsa wanted to create that conventional waltz, but still employed modern techniques to suggest mounting hysteria and emotional turmoil.

Other good Rozsa waltzes are the exquisite 'Lydia' waltz which mirrors Lydia's nostalgia and youth, the 'Time Machine' waltz which is mock-Victorian, the 'Valse Crepusculaire' from Resnais' 'Providence', which is fatalistic and elegaic, the 'Tea Dance' waltz from 'Blood on the Sun' (only a period diegetic piece) etc..

In the hands of a good composer the waltz can be very organic to the feel and emotion of the film, and its rhythms, as are the above, not just on-scene colour.

What about Herrmann's 'Momory Waltz' from 'The Snows of Kilimanjaro', Steiner's 'Jezebel' waltz, etc.?

For a 'non-dance' waltz that merely plays as suggestion, try Korngold's 'Flirtation' from 'The Prince and the Pauper'.

Jarre knocks up at least two good waltzes in 'Dr. Zhivago' which are Russian rather than Austrian in style.

Arthur Benjamin: 'An Ideal Husband'.




 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2014 - 11:12 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Desiree's main title is a waltz which, once started, I have to see through till the end. Though the score is credited to North, it was Alfred Newman who conceived of it. Just being aware of this morsel of info makes it stand out. The main title waltz is wonderfully musical.

Later on the CD, we have the Desiree Waltz which is, in stark contrast, deliberately plod-like, possibly because it has to allow for dialog to stand out. Quite a difference in execution to the wonderful MT. I sometimes wonder if North arranged it that way because it was not from his hand. That's why the Desiree waltz sticks out to me - one waltz is flamboyant, the other a dirge.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2014 - 11:15 AM   
 By:   verticity   (Member)

Bernard Herrmann - Memory Waltz from Snows of Kilimanjaro. The aching, melancholy waltz from THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSON.

Maurice Jarre - DOCTOR ZHIVAGO.

Max Steiner - the fund raisingVerticirty (auction) waltz from GONE WITH THE WIND

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2014 - 11:50 AM   
 By:   Mr Drive   (Member)

There is lots and lots of wonderful waltzing in Japanese film music. One example:



(Not sure if it fits your bill though.)

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2014 - 12:28 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Heh. Surprised I never mentioned (and no one else did) Leia's Seduction Waltz from Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2014 - 2:09 PM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

A lot of the times, waltzes are utilized in historical movies to establish a certain period from anytime between the Napoleonic Era and World War I.
Other times, waltzes function as source music during formal dances, or brass marching bands.
In most cases, these are written in a very traditional Viennese/Straussian mold, and, when these waltzes are included onto soundtrack programs, I skip over them to move onward to the next cue.

Few exceptions exist wherein I'm entranced by a descriptive waltz to listen to it in its entirety.

Richard Rodney Bennett composed fluid and graceful symphonic waltzes in his scores for NICHOLAS AND ALEXANDRA and GORMENGHAST.
Jerry Fielding utilized waltz-like material in a very commentative manner in THE NIGHTCOMERS to depict emotional intensity via contrast.
Jerry Goldsmith's "Dress Waltz" from his rejected LEGEND score could very well serve as ballet music.
Another unexpectedly beautiful one can be heard in GOD'S LITTLE ACRE; Elmer Bernstein proved he is no slouch either by giving us an almost Ravel-like "Peachtree Valley Waltz".

Do you have any similar examples of these types of waltzes from among your favorite scores?


Goldsmith's waltz from LEGEND is my favourite cue from this score, which is my favourite Goldsmith score.
But one thing:
Why everyone refers to this score as "rejected"?
It was partly rejected, since it wasn't used in USA. But it WAS used in the International version of the film. (and the director's cut later)

Another waltz that I love is from a masterful Gabriel Yared score for a documentary:
Valse Industrie from L'ARCHE ET LES DELUGES

Not impressionistic in style, but the theme from Elmer Bernstein's THE AGE OF INNOCENCE (used as dramatic score and not source music) is a waltz. Masterpiece!

 
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