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This is a comments thread about Blog Post: Hansness by Kjell Neckebroeck
 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2011 - 8:00 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

I, for one, could happily live without hearing that Zimmeresque chugging string ostinato again for the rest of my life.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2011 - 11:28 PM   
 By:   Ian J.   (Member)

The posting mentions that there are composers who still write end credit music. These days I don't get the impression that the composers get much say in the matter. While it may be true in some cases that a composer gets some end credit freedom, it seems to me that for the majority of films of the last decade or so (regardless of genre or size of budget) the producers are looking to save whatever money they can and so either stick with the near obligatory well known pop song, and/or hack together some music from cues previously recorded for use within the film.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2011 - 12:40 AM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

The Hunt For Red October was one of 1990's first releases instead of being a summer blockbuster, and Born On The Fourth Of July came out in 1989! Back To The Future Part III (Alan Silvestri's most multi-thematic score of the trilogy) and Total Recall, on the other hand, definitely qualify...

 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2011 - 7:58 AM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

Regarding Die Hard 2:

avowedly, the late Michael Kamen added little to the palette of the one that launched the franchise

Very interesting. I strongly, swiftly, and passionately disagree.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2011 - 10:45 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I just wanted to say to Kjell that I really enjoyed reading this blog and his efforts to be fair and to support his ideas. I didn't come away from this blog thinking Kyell was a Zimmer basher or hater, not at all. Because Zimmer's style of music is very popular, I thought the author was bemoaning that fact that the movie industry was pushing other composers towards Zimmer's style or sound. By pressuring other composers to emulate Zimmer's style, composers have to sacrifice their own personal signature styles. Seems to me like a valid complaint against the movie industry because a lot of us like variety in our music. I like a lot of Zimmer's compositions, but I don't want that sacrificed into a, "One style fits all," mode.

 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2011 - 2:08 PM   
 By:   danbeck   (Member)

In the case of Gremlins 2 I would not say that it is "regurgitated material from the first". On the contrary, it is one sequel that, like Poltergeist II, actually deviates a lot from the first. Except for the Gizmo theme the rest of the score is all new material with very little use of the Gremlins Rag.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2011 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   neelyre   (Member)

I also really liked the article,

I too started collecting in the mid 80s and seem to grow increasingly less interested in the musical ideas in cinema. Admittedly, movies aren't made they way they were 20-30 years ago- you can nearly do ANYTHING (music, effects, editing) completely on computers and budgets & deadlines have gotten insanely out of hand. It only makes sense that much music has to be written 'systematically' and quickly. Add in the fact that producers would love to streamline a popular soundtrack album with hit songs as additional revenue, and you've got too little time and too much interference to really generate something unique.

I don't blame the past and current composers for maybe adapting an occasional 'lazy' attitude. Working in video post production, I have dealt with so many producers & tight deadlines that even I have embraced the mantra of 'If you're happy, I'm happy.'

Again, Good article and well thought out, without bashing the composers smile


 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2011 - 5:15 PM   
 By:   cushinglee   (Member)

All this pap about a Jerry cult. Sometimes I wonder about some of the stauncher Zimmerphiles and what flavor Kool Aid they're drinkin'.

 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2011 - 3:03 AM   
 By:   Hercule Platini   (Member)

The Hunt For Red October was one of 1990's first releases instead of being a summer blockbuster, and Born On The Fourth Of July came out in 1989! Back To The Future Part III (Alan Silvestri's most multi-thematic score of the trilogy) and Total Recall, on the other hand, definitely qualify...

Depends where in the world you are. BORN ON THE FOURTH was definitely a March 1990 release in the UK; RED OCTOBER came out April 1990. Back then international releases were all over the place and it wasn't uncommon for films to take six months to get to the UK. That nice Christmassy EDWADR SCISSORHANDS was a summer release over here.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2011 - 9:35 AM   
 By:   Luc Van der Eeken   (Member)

Right on the mark, Kjell...

 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2011 - 11:06 AM   
 By:   gone   (Member)

from article : "I do mind blockbuster scores, the double whoppers of my film music diet, the ones I look forward to every year"

Primary difference between author and self. If a blockbuster score happens to appeal to me, fine. But they certainly are not the ones I look forward to, or expect to deliver in a big way. It is often the less celebrated movies that contain the music I like most, thank goodness! -g-

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2011 - 11:42 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Hmmm. My two favorite films this year TREE OF LIFE, about as personal a blockbuster for Terence Malick as BORN ON THE FOURTH OF JULY was to Oliver Stone, and SOURCE CODE aren't even factored in. Movies like TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES, ROCKY V or even DAYS OF THUNDER were floundering around in 1990, amongst others, so even I who believes things have gone downhill don't think this particular anaylses is very balanced.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2011 - 6:22 PM   
 By:   Marlene   (Member)

Lovely Blog Post. Thank you very much.

This post so mirrored my feelings about scores being composed today, it was almost eerie!

I will not talk about details here or scores that were left out or criticized (because that´s unimportant for the message) but I really feel that the industry is destroying itself right now if they don´t stop it soon. I cannot recall a score that impressed and surprised me very much the last two or three years. Maybe "Inception" (there you go...) and "Salt" and I´m sure I´m forgetting some... maybe even Tron: Legacy (but I don´t know whether it was the fact that Daft Punk was able to achieve it or because it was really good)

 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2011 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

Just to throw in my humble two cents, I think the film score industry is healthy, vibrant, and thrillingly wonderful at present, I'm completely satisfied with the range of scores and collection of composers, and I generally wouldn't change a thing.

I often feel I'm in the minority (the tiny minority) at FSM in feeling this way, which of course doesn't change anything for me, but I do confess to feeling a bit lonely in these hallowed halls on the subject of quality of modern film scoring...

 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2011 - 7:53 PM   
 By:   gone   (Member)

Just to throw in my humble two cents, I think the film score industry is healthy, vibrant, and thrillingly wonderful at present, I'm completely satisfied with the range of scores and collection of composers, and I generally wouldn't change a thing.

I often feel I'm in the minority (the tiny minority) at FSM in feeling this way, which of course doesn't change anything for me, but I do confess to feeling a bit lonely in these hallowed halls on the subject of quality of modern film scoring...


You're not alone DR! JNH has done some truly wonderful work, precious little of which gets discussed in depth (I just now ordered "Defiance"); Desplat has written a total gem for the likes of the Twilight franchise (who woulda guessed?) amongst other keepers; our good friend Alan Silvestri has plenty in the tank, etc, etc. smile

I have noticed a trend towards 'soundscapes' for some scores... "The Way Back" is very nice but borders in the realm of soundscapes. I still prefer a fully orchestrated approach, filled in with interesting rhythms if the movie calls for it, as Silvestri is so adept at.

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2011 - 12:31 AM   
 By:   voiced   (Member)

THOR – Patrick Doyle reluctantly allowed into blockbuster territory, as long as he didn’t stray far from the comfort zone established by Remote Control’s big honcho.



An interesting read, but the above statement doesn't make any sense.

What precisely do you mean by 'reluctantly allowed'?

If you're referring to Thor being Doyle's first blockbuster then that's nonsense, are you forgetting Harry Potter, Eragon, Bridget Jones' Diary etc.?

Or if you're just jumping on the 'Doyle isn't allowed to embrace contemporary elements and evolve wagon' then please, at least back up your statement with actual facts.

 
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