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This is a comments thread about Blog Post: My Vintage Selection for 2011, Part 1! by Thomas Rucki
 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2011 - 7:34 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I've always wrestled with when a decade ends and another begins outside of looking at a calendar, and I've long considered 1980 the '70s, just like the 1960s last up until about 1973...that'll teach me to file pop culture in little boxes. wink

"Subversive '70s" indeed! It's practically an act of war to post about anything from that decade here these days. big grin

While I refrained from buying anything in 2011, it's still got some titles I "need" to get. Telefon, Harry in Your Pocket, and Funeral Home among them.

 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2011 - 7:16 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)


SPECIFICATIONS: THE CRITERIA ARE BASED ON THE FOLLOWING AXIOMS: THE RICHNESS OF THE ORIGINAL RECORDING, THE INTEGRITY OF THE INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, THE LEVEL OF INNOVATION, THE PACE OF THE CORPUS, THE ELEMENT OF SURPRISE, THE COLOR OF THE INSTRUMENTS USE, THE CROSS-REFERENCES.


While agreeing with your overall focus, Mr. Rucki, that the finest film music compositions occurred during the 1950s, 1960s, & 1970s, I'm interested in learning about why a number of soundtrack albums released during 2011 (which contain scores from these decades) fail to appear on your list regarding the criteria you've specified.

For example, "Summer And Smoke" is my favorite Elmer Bernstein soundtrack, and "Men In War" is amongst my 'top 5' Bernstein scores. Naturally, I agree with what you had written about these titles.
However, Kritzerland also re-issued the LP programs of Bernstein's "Drango" and "Kings Go Forth", as well as offering us 2 other items of prime Bernstein never before released: "Fear Strikes Out" with "The Tin Star".
Is the reason why these other titles don't appear within your article because you have an issue (or issues) with these sound recordings, or the integrity of the music or the instrumental colors?

Kritzerland also released CDs of others with similar vintage, like Alfred Newman's "The Counterfeit Traitor" and "Black Sunday" by Les Baxter. Should readers of your article deduce that the omission of Newman's "Traitor" is due to its lack of innovation according to the criteria?

"Robinson Crusoe On Mars" by Van Cleave gets highlighted in the article; yet, 2 more of Van Cleave's soundtracks received premieres during 2011 (and by FSM as well) without a mention of either of them in the 1950s category.
What about the 3 CDs from the MMM label, which offer significant contributions to the discographies of Heinz Roemheld and Herschel Burke Gilbert?

So far, only Hollywood movies and American composers have been mentioned.
Without doubt, there's other notable 2011 CDs deserving of citation, but they may be absent from the article due to the CDs being produced outside of the U.S.A. and/or them being soundtracks from non-English language cinema.

An "element of surprise" awaits those folks uninitiated with the film music of Piero Piccioni, for example. Whether scoring Francesco Rosi features such as "Salvatore Guiliano" (1962) or "Hands Over The City" (1963), or an obscure item like "Il Monaco" (1972), Piccioni demonstrates a high "level of innovation" with "color of the instruments" yielding an "integrity of the instrumental music".
Had Piccioni music such as this ever surfaced in a Clint Eastwood movie, Piccioni might be praised in the same breath as Jerry Fielding and Lalo Schifrin.

Fans of Ennio Morricone may wonder why none of his music received coverage within this article while a few John Barry soundtracks did.
There's more innovation and color in Morricone's 1975 "Moses" (released March 2011 on the Legend label) than within "The Knack", for instance.

Speaking of the Italian Legend label, they released in May 2011 what is likely to be the most comprehensive version of "The Bible" by Toshiro Mayuzumi that will ever exist.
"The Bible" was initially released on vinyl record in 1966, plus it also received an Academy Award nomination for best score.
This 2-CD Legend album, with its 2+ hour duration, triples the amount of music!
Certainly a release like this deserves a review.
Although the Legend album has variable sound quality culled from different sources, it's nevertheless important in presenting the entirety of Mayuzumi's large musical canvas.
Lengthy passages (which were never on the original LP) showcase much more of Mayuzumi's impressionistic and dissonant music than ever before. Tracks such as "Forbidden Fruit" and "Banishment From The Garden" demonstrate masterly incorporation of 12-tone techniques into the musical fabric.

With no shortage of innovation and integrity within this "Bible", one is not sure why it is absent (like many others) from this overview…

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2011 - 6:26 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)



While agreeing with your overall focus, Mr. Rucki, that the finest film music compositions occurred during the 1950s, 1960s, & 1970s, I'm interested in learning about why a number of soundtrack albums released during 2011 (which contain scores from these decades) fail to appear on your list regarding the criteria you've specified.



The title of the blog is explicit enough: it's a selection. It's not exhaustive at all.
A selection is subjective—and sometimes, elitist: notice the taste for Schifrin and Herrmann—, and relies on biases (like knowing the film, the decade, the composer or the music department, the musical leaning, enjoying the samples). It also reflects how you feel at an exact moment and it is an introspective and cerebral affair in the very end. Besides, you can't buy them all: it's economic and a choice.
On the whole, I'd like to have an overview of a year in vintage soundtracks.
I am very fond of vintage Hollywood but I'm not a completist on all composers. Even, a composer whose work and continuity I admire can write an uninteresting piece during an exciting era. It's very uneven due to the nature of the profession. Keep in mind there were many conventional or dull scores during "these" three decades.

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2011 - 2:45 PM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

Nice list Thomas I was quite interested in all those titles but only ended up picking up a few of them Quartet's The Knack already owned the Ryko disc but I really hated the dialogue on that one.

Summer and Smoke was another title I already owned but Kritzerland's disc was too good to pass they have done a superb job on the mastering of that one it is also one of my favourite Bernstein scores.

Really love Klute and find it very engaging but my initial spins of Audrey Rose where a bit disappointing need to give that one a few more listens soon.

Harry in your Pocket has been one of my best purchases in 2011

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2011 - 4:14 AM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

Tonerow did you pick up this gem that Kronos Records released earlier in the year


My copy of Legend/GDM disc has yet to arrive

It is certainly one of the highlights of the year for me I have seen the film for Hands Over the City and loved what music was used in it. Seems strange that Francesco Rosi has mentioned how much he enjoys listening to the lp of Piccioni's score but at the time he was making the film he must have decided to leave a lot of it off.

Makes me wonder if these other two scores are mentioned as complete on this disc really are all the music that Piccioni composed for them.







 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2011 - 4:19 AM   
 By:   Urs Lesse   (Member)

While I refrained from buying anything in 2011, it's still got some titles I "need" to get. Telefon, Harry in Your Pocket, and Funeral Home among them.

Jim, you'd better not lose much more time buying HARRY IN YOUR POCKET. It's sold out at Quartet Records.

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2011 - 5:00 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

With no shortage of innovation and integrity within this "Bible", one is not sure why it is absent (like many others) from this overview…
-----

Because Thomas was expressing HIS opinion not ToneRow's wink

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2011 - 5:24 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Nice list Thomas I was quite interested in all those titles but only ended up picking up a few of them Quartet's The Knack already owned the Ryko disc but I really hated the dialogue on that one.

Summer and Smoke was another title I already owned but Kritzerland's disc was too good to pass they have done a superb job on the mastering of that one it is also one of my favourite Bernstein scores.

Really love Klute and find it very engaging but my initial spins of Audrey Rose where a bit disappointing need to give that one a few more listens soon.

Harry in your Pocket has been one of my best purchases in 2011





There is a little gem that deserves to be known:
"Killer by Night" (1971) by Quincy Jones (Film Score Monthly)
Read my review at:
http://filmscoremonthly.com/daily/article.cfm/articleID/6758/My-Vintage-Selection-for-2011-Part-2!/
Order the sublime and addictive "Killer by Night" at:
http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/16647/NIGHTWATCH-KILLER-BY-NIGHT/

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2011 - 9:11 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Jim, you'd better not lose much more time buying HARRY IN YOUR POCKET. It's sold out at Quartet Records.

It wasn't a "must buy" for me, though I will be getting the DVD--it's the same price--seeing as my listening habits for film scores is largely enjoying the music within the context of the film. Old fashioned but contrarian as hell, yet I just prefer hearing the music that way.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2011 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Good to see your reviews, Thomas. There was very little feedback on the appropriate thread about KILLER BY NIGHT when it was first released, and that kind of surprised me because I know that Quincy Jones is hugely loved. I'm a sort of instinct buyer anyway, so I don't NEED people to tell me that something is good before I place an order, but you've helped to make me push this to the top of the "to order" list. Quincy Jones was a master of innovative modernistic mood scoring, which is a facet often overlooked when we tend to focus on the funk factor alone. And the Johnny Williams won't be ignored either.

I think I'll get HARRY IN YOUR POCKET too.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2011 - 10:09 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Good to see your reviews, Thomas. There was very little feedback on the appropriate thread about KILLER BY NIGHT when it was first released, and that kind of surprised me because I know that Quincy Jones is hugely loved. I'm a sort of instinct buyer anyway, so I don't NEED people to tell me that something is good before I place an order, but you've helped to make me push this to the top of the "to order" list. Quincy Jones was a master of innovative modernistic mood scoring, which is a facet often overlooked when we tend to focus on the funk factor alone. And the Johnny Williams won't be ignored either.

I think I'll get HARRY IN YOUR POCKET too.



HARRY is "the" vintage release of the year 2011: don't miss it!
Here is a teaser for Jimbo:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9hOz1Z3iAQ

And don’t forget Harry’s rules: “We travel first class, best rooms, best clothes, best food. Everything strictly the best”.
And above all, Harry’s law: “Harry never holds. Not for a minute, not for thirty seconds.”

 
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