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 Posted:   Jul 15, 2014 - 7:49 AM   
 By:   KeoNato   (Member)


He used synths in Star Trek Into Darkness???

I didn't notice any in the first Trek film he did (film or score release) or the newer film (haven't listened to it on CD).


I only noticed it recently when watching the movie with headphones. It's during Harrison's jump ship attack early in the movie. (And it may or may not be more evident on an unmentionable that may or may not exist...)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

Saw this last night and while I did enjoy it and think it's a pretty good film, I enjoyed the last one (Rise) more and found it's more intimate setting more involving.
It's good that this one is taking things up a notch, but I found sections of it quite plodding and boring. Too many scenes reminded me of Greystoke (I know, hard to avoid with all those life among the apes/tribes scenes) and I didn't care as much for the characters in this one (human and ape) as much as I did in Rise.
Still, amongst the usual dross, this was a bit different from the norm so I didn't suffer as much franchise fatigue, which is nice.
I also thought the music by Giacchino was pretty standard by him, hearing his now familiar tropes being trotted out, from the plinky/slow piano theme, through the Lost-like percussion sections and John Carter mystery and choir, to the Super 8 suspense/action licks. Admittedly miles better than 'phone-a-drone' Remote Control stuff, but not up to previous MG efforts and below Patrick Doyle's effort on Rise for me.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 6:42 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

Love this score, also because it knows when to remain understated (a rarity these days) and how to do pathos that feels earned rather than forced by overpowering the listener.

There is real tension and startling tenderness in this score. Yes, Giacchino uses all the tricks in his book, and due to the vast catalogue of his expansive work on LOST one might get the feeling of familiarity. Still, to my ears this score shows a more mature approach of an artist rising above his early sturm & drang.

A great score, on my top ten list this year!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   Tango Urilla   (Member)

I just saw Dawn this past weekend and thought Giacchino's score worked perfectly. His music made a real impact during the first twenty-some minutes when we're with the ape colony in the redwoods. No dialogue, just pictures of a primeval community living out its daily routine, fathers raising sons, spearing fish or bathing at the river, returning to their home fort on the cliff, and Giacchino's music tenderly tying together this moving portrait of life.

Despite Ligeti appearing recently in Godzilla, I found the 2001 reference over the opening deer hunt incredibly stirring and of course far more fitting a reference. I'm not denying how well the nods worked in Godzilla, but in Dawn the music worked not merely to suggest something terrible and otherworldly, but to underline the growing humanity of the apes as well. I also enjoyed the brief flourishes of clattering percussion that accompanied the warring side of the apes. All in all a terrific film (best I've seen so far this year) and a perfectly emotive score to go along with it.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 10:34 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Love this score, also because it knows when to remain understated (a rarity these days) and how to do pathos that feels earned rather than forced by overpowering the listener.

There is real tension and startling tenderness in this score. Yes, Giacchino uses all the tricks in his book, and due to the vast catalogue of his expansive work on LOST one might get the feeling of familiarity. Still, to my ears this score shows a more mature approach of an artist rising above his early sturm & drang.

A great score, on my top ten list this year!


Were there even 9 other scores this year?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2014 - 9:54 AM   
 By:   Pedestrian Wolf   (Member)

My review of both the film and score are now up at Movie Music Musings, for anyone interested. I seem to be the only person who didn't completely love the film, but I still overall liked it - with several major reservations. The score on the other hand ... well here's the review:

https://moviemusicmusings.wordpress.com/2014/07/29/dawn-of-the-planet-of-the-apes-film-and-score-review/

Thanks!

Paul

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2014 - 10:51 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

"Were there even 9 other scores this year?"
----------------------------------
Certainly not from Hollywood there weren't.
Thank God the rest of the world hasn't got tin ears!

 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 9:09 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

I never understood why critics were drawing parallels to Goldsmith's score based on a pre-listen of the score itself. But, in the movie, there's a few places where the complex rhythmic percussion or xylophone runs are very prominent in the mix and it does indeed remind me of some aspects of Goldsmith's original.

Apparently this movie was originally slated to be a reimagning of the original POTA. I hope the next movie jumps straight to that and does an interesting reinterpretation of that movie, rather than the less interesting war film this instalment appears to set up.


I finally got the CD to this. Having just listened to it, I'm still trying to find the parallels to Goldsmith. I hear very little of anything approaching Goldsmith, which is ironic given that in the booklet's liner notes Giacchino goes so far as to thank Goldsmith and his score to the '68 original as "a staple of my childhood which continues to amaze and inspire me to this day." I was hoping for some of the atonal approach of Goldsmith and thought Giacchino was the modern composer best able to deliver it, but instead he seems more inspired by the earlier sci-fi/fantasy score sensibilities of a Paul Sawtell than anything Goldsmith would later do.

That said, I though the music worked fine supporting a film that wasn't quite all that it could be. I'm a little worried for the reborn franchise as I think we very much are going to get another war movie with the next one. DAWN did very little but spin it wheels in presenting largely what was not much more than simian soap opera and as result dug a hole for itself.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2014 - 6:32 AM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

Love this score! Just finished first listen. It's my favorite Giacchino film score, along with John Carter. Giacchino can often be hit or miss with me on the big screen but DotPotA is a knockout from start to finish. Again, just like John Carter, there are hardly any dull tracks, a great flowing album and each cue after another is great -- and of course, some are magnificent.

Seriously hope Giacchino scores the next Apes film!

I agree with WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin's great post (although I find it very difficult to quote your name in a reference, good sir, it took me several times to memorize the five names to get it right when quoting your name), which I thought was insightful and spot-on. Also one of my top 10 scores of the year!

 
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