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 Posted:   Jun 3, 2013 - 10:48 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

My Top 5:

  • the "Metzengerstein" segment of HISTOIRES EXTRAORDINAIRES (SPIRITS OF THE DEAD)
  • DON JUAN 1973
  • LE REPOS DU GUERRIER (LOVE ON A PILLOW)
  • ET MOURIR DE PLAISIR (BLOOD AND ROSES)
  • LA CURéE (THE GAME IS OVER)

  •  
     
     Posted:   Jun 3, 2013 - 11:08 AM   
     By:   Angelillo   (Member)

    I was about to say "none" but I suddenly remember there's not some uninteresting stuff in :

    LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES 1960, an update of Choderlos Delaclos' book and worth seeing thanks to Gérard Philipe, Jeanne Moreau and score.




    But that's all.

    I simply find this long-dated "filmmaker" uninspired and boring, and I've never understood all that buzz about him in some foreign countries...

     
     Posted:   Jun 3, 2013 - 4:36 PM   
     By:   ToneRow   (Member)

    I simply find this long-dated "filmmaker" uninspired and boring, and I've never understood all that buzz about him in some foreign countries...

    I like Vadim's visual aesthetic, though. Vadim films have interesting (to me) costumes, set decorations and color photography.

    Additionally, Vadim (along with Louis Malle) pushed the envelope during the late 1950s with free-thinking and feminism (in deference to sexual relationships) without the sort of "punishment" that censors and moral authorities had imposed upon cinema and TV up to that point in time.
    [imagine episodes of ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS wherein murderers don't get caught and punished. smile ]

    Female leads in Vadim movies could be independent spirits and enjoy sex as much as any promiscuous/adulterous male - and without the obligatory reprimand.

    IMO, Vadim was the most successful director of SPIRITS OF THE DEAD to capture the poetry of Poe via moods/atmosphere.

    Still, one may looking for other traits - aspects which may be absent from a Vadim picture - in films, and Vadim may fail to deliver in those areas.

     
     
     Posted:   Jun 3, 2013 - 6:01 PM   
     By:   dan the man   (Member)

    I really liked his BLOOD AND ROSES-60, much more so then his SPIRITS OF THE DEAD.BARBARELLA was fun.

     
     
     Posted:   Jun 4, 2013 - 10:29 AM   
     By:   Angelillo   (Member)

    Vadim films have interesting (to me) costumes, set decorations and color photography.

    I didn't notice such a singularity of treatment of these aspects in his films but I may be wrong, though. About color photography he's simply been lucky to work with Thirard, Renoir or Decaë. It would be interesting to compare three colour movies he did with each of those cinematographers to see if "he" is actually in charge, that is if the three movies have a similar "color aesthetics" trend...


    Additionally, Vadim pushed the envelope during the late 1950s with free-thinking and feminism

    I'm sure Vadim was a lot of things, but saying he was a feminist or someone expressing feminist ideas in his movies that's not pushing the envelope any more : that's simply kicking the envelope from Earth to Pluto !

    For Vadim a woman is free to think, yes, but only free to think she's made to serve men. Of course she can dress (and undress) sexy clothes, have strong language, say merde to moral authorities but she will eventually end up in men's bed.

    Don't forget Vadim adapted that great pre-fascist writer named Sade !

    And the way he pictured women in his movies has always been a kind of soft-sexploitation meant for men.

     
     Posted:   Jun 4, 2013 - 11:00 AM   
     By:   ToneRow   (Member)

    About color photography he's simply been lucky to work with Thirard, Renoir or Decaë. It would be interesting to compare three colour movies he did with each of those cinematographers to see if "he" is actually in charge, that is if the three movies have a similar "color aesthetics" trend...


    Yes, precisely.
    I like the cinematographers who lensed his movies, but whether input is that of the lighting cameramen or from the director - I don't know. I like the end results, though.

     
     Posted:   Jun 4, 2013 - 11:08 AM   
     By:   ToneRow   (Member)

    I'm sure Vadim was a lot of things, but saying he was a feminist or someone expressing feminist ideas in his movies that's not pushing the envelope any more : that's simply kicking the envelope from Earth to Pluto !

    For Vadim a woman is free to think, yes, but only free to think she's made to serve men. Of course she can dress (and undress) sexy clothes, have strong language, say merde to moral authorities but she will eventually end up in men's bed.

    Don't forget Vadim adapted that great pre-fascist writer named Sade !

    And the way he pictured women in his movies has always been a kind of soft-sexploitation meant for men.


    I don't think of Vadim as a feminist, though - I was referring to his pictures pushing the envelope for the late-'50s audiences.
    It was the public & the censors who had issues with AND GOD CREATED WOMAN, for example.
    Louis Malle's THE LOVERS also did this: Jeanne Moreau commits adultery and leaves her husband for a younger man - with no punishment.

    Think of it this way: Vadim was born in 1928, but aspects of his cinema reflect the baby-boomer sexual revolution attitudes.
    Even Brigitte Bardot herself considered her own parents as dinosaurs (referring to their strict Catholicism).

     
     
     Posted:   Jun 4, 2013 - 11:51 AM   
     By:   Angelillo   (Member)

    Louis Malle's THE LOVERS also did this: Jeanne Moreau commits adultery and leaves her husband for a younger man - with no punishment.

    I'm sure you know french cinema did not have a cinematographic moral code à la Hays Code, so it was far easier to film such a stories and I guess could find some previous examples in earlier decades.

    There was of course a "Censorship Bureau", but if there was a censorship, it would happen once the movie was completed, not during the writing process like in Hollywood.

     
     Posted:   Jun 4, 2013 - 4:22 PM   
     By:   ToneRow   (Member)

    Louis Malle's THE LOVERS also did this: Jeanne Moreau commits adultery and leaves her husband for a younger man - with no punishment.

    I'm sure you know french cinema did not have a cinematographic moral code à la Hays Code, so it was far easier to film such a stories and I guess could find some previous examples in earlier decades.

    There was of course a "Censorship Bureau", but if there was a censorship, it would happen once the movie was completed, not during the writing process like in Hollywood.


    Oh yes - I realize the Hays Code was America only, but there was also a British Board of Censors, too.

    But my point is more about audience reception of carnal pleasures not being sinful, whereas institutionalized religion (especially during the pre-1964 Ecunemical Council) treated fornication as sin.
    Many cinema patrons were influenced by their religious background/upbringing and anything which was associated with nudity or intercourse was deemed as bad.
    [I should know - my own mother and aunts exhibited this perspective: nude = bad].

    Also, there were non-industry publications (like the Catholic Standard & Times) which offered input and assessments on cinematic content in terms of moral/ethical aesthetcis independent of the Hays Code.

    Another example, from the time of the Soviet Union, is director Jan Nemec's REPORT ON THE PARTY AND THE GUESTS (1968) - which was "banned forever" in its native Czech Republic.
    Not for nudity. Not for sex, violence nor profane language. But for its characters exhibiting anti-bureaucratic non-conformity (a critique of socialist regimes and the lack of individual freedoms).
    Fortunately, this Czech film did not remain banned forever - I eventually saw it during the late 1990s courtesy Facets Video. smile

     
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