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 Posted:   Jun 14, 2013 - 11:24 PM   
 By:   scoreaholic   (Member)

I wish that the USA was producing movies these days that weren't just action/special effects blockbusters. The music to these movies is usually not very thematic and is usually just bombastic percussion action music. Where is a good place to find music to foreign films? I'm especially interested in British, Irish, New Zealand, and Australian films but would like to sample others as well. I'm especially looking for films with lots of plot and some action to produce scores hopefully with about half action half thematic quiet cues. If any one can help me that would be much appreciated. I certainly hope this trend ends soon, but I doubt it!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2013 - 11:54 PM   
 By:   scoreaholic   (Member)

Ok, I think I would like to know where to get any foreign film/t.v. music. As I said British, Irish, New Zealand, and Australian would be my top choice, but I would like to sample any music from foreign films/t.v. I am enjoying listening to cues from Martin Phipps composed music (mostly from t.v.), but I don't think it's available yet.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 12:14 AM   
 By:   Rick15   (Member)

Ok, I think I would like to know where to get any foreign film/t.v. music. As I said British, Irish, New Zealand, and Australian would be my top choice, but I would like to sample any music from foreign films/t.v. I am enjoying listening to cues from Martin Phipps composed music (mostly from t.v.), but I don't think it's available yet.

Have you tried a site called 1M1....I haven't looked for a while but I am pretty sure they specialise in Australian Soundtracks.

http://www.1m1.com.au

Not the prettiest site to look at but they do have some interesting stuff there.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 6:06 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

YOR agrees that the state of film music in USA is very sad now.

Very few composers are still able to compose interesting music for movies and some of them are even forced to emulate the abominable "style"!

YOR hopes that this trend end someday soon too, but doubt it since there are a lot of people who actually like this kind of noise...

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 6:23 AM   
 By:   Dyfrynt   (Member)

While I agree that the state of film music today is atrocious, it certainly is NOT bombastic. We are in an age where action films have no action music to accompany them. Pick just about any blockbuster film in recent times and the scores are all minimalist, meant not to be heard, background.

Best example is the most recent release, Man of Steel. Compare Zimmer's whimpering music to the fanfare and instantly recognizable tunes from Superman the Movie.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 6:33 AM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

If you don't care for current scores, look at re releases of classic film music as there are several labels that release wonderful older scores. tribute film score classics is a great label for this and they have excellent Herrmann re recordings especially. Korngold and Steiner as well.

I also recommend 20th century orchestral composers like Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Sibelius, Bartok, Vaughan Williams, Barber, etc. And if you are more adventurous Varese, Xenakis. crrumb. Minimalists like John Adams are also interesting to listen to. When you discover these composers' works, you will hear direct ties to scores that you love. That's what I have been doing lately since I have generally close interest in most current film scores save for a few that blend styles in an interesting way.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 7:52 AM   
 By:   scoreaholic   (Member)

I do like some current scores. Man of Steel is very loud and percussive, why I said bombastic. The theme is minimalist, I grant you that. If anyone wants great Hans Zimmer film music from recent then go to youtube and look up "The Dark Knight Rises: Complete Score." This is what I love from a score. Very thematic, quiet in spots and very much loud in others while still carrying a tune. "Total Recall" (Goldsmith) is probably my favorite action score of all time and wholly exemplifies what I love from a score. Not to say that I don't like quiet scores as well. "To Kill a Mockingbird," "Meet Joe Black," and "A River Runs Through it" are some of my favorites. I wish movies like these were being made nowadays in the USA.

BTW- "Superman" (Williams) is my all time favorite score!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 8:04 AM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)


YOR hopes that this trend end someday soon too, but doubt it since there are a lot of people who actually like this kind of noise...


It won't end, not only because of that, but because today's teenagers who will become tomorrow's film producers and directors are growing up with this style, and are accustomed to it, so they will never ask for anything more than this (eg like the symphonic scores of the past).
I think the last generation that loves symphonic scores is the one who was born during the 80s and early 90s..

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 8:26 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)


YOR hopes that this trend end someday soon too, but doubt it since there are a lot of people who actually like this kind of noise...


It won't end, not only because of that, but because today's teenagers who will become tomorrow's film producers and directors are growing up with this style, and are accustomed to it, so they will never ask for anything more than this (eg like the symphonic scores of the past).
I think the last generation that loves symphonic scores is the one who was born during the 80s and early 90s..


True it seems bleak. But I hold out hope. Until Jaws and more importantly Star Wars, film music of the 70's was pretty bland. It took a few young directors whom found appreciate for the epic scores of the 50's to revive the classical score.

Lucas, give him his due could have just as easily gone with electronics or worse yet pop or disco music for Star Wars. It will take a few yet unknown directors whom will find inspiration from the past. Everything old is new again.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 8:50 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Hmm, yes... there's not a lot that has enthused me in mainstream Hollywood scores in the past years, but I think that, whilst it's true that John Williams (and particularly STAR WARS) "revived" the old symphonic sound, by dissing the trends taken up in Hollywood scores between roughly the late '60s until STAR WARS, we're doing a huge disservice to the composers of some of the best, most interesting music of that period - in particular the gritty urban sounds of Shire, Small, Grusin, Schifrin, Fielding..., and Williams himself, to name just a few off the top of my head.

In fact, I think that in some ways the trend that STAR WARS started (scoring every SF or fantasy film in a heavily orchestral pastiche way) wore out its welcome pretty soon.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 8:59 AM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)


YOR hopes that this trend end someday soon too, but doubt it since there are a lot of people who actually like this kind of noise...


It won't end, not only because of that, but because today's teenagers who will become tomorrow's film producers and directors are growing up with this style, and are accustomed to it, so they will never ask for anything more than this (eg like the symphonic scores of the past).
I think the last generation that loves symphonic scores is the one who was born during the 80s and early 90s..


True it seems bleak. But I hold out hope. Until Jaws and more importantly Star Wars, film music of the 70's was pretty bland. It took a few young directors whom found appreciate for the epic scores of the 50's to revive the classical score.

Lucas, give him his due could have just as easily gone with electronics or worse yet pop or disco music for Star Wars. It will take a few yet unknown directors whom will find inspiration from the past. Everything old is new again.


One only needs to look at he Schifrin's score to THX1138 to see what Star Wars might have been if scored by someone other than Williams. Thankfully, a certain director recommended Lucas contact John Williams.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 9:17 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Hmm, yes... there's not a lot that has enthused me in mainstream Hollywood scores in the past years, but I think that, whilst it's true that John Williams (and particularly STAR WARS) "revived" the old symphonic sound, by dissing the trends taken up in Hollywood scores between roughly the late '60s until STAR WARS, we're doing a huge disservice to the composers of some of the best, most interesting music of that period - in particular the gritty urban sounds of Shire, Small, Grusin, Schifrin, Fielding..., and Williams himself, to name just a few off the top of my head.

In fact, I think that in some ways the trend that STAR WARS started (scoring every SF or fantasy film in a heavily orchestral pastiche way) wore out its welcome pretty soon.


No disrespect meant towards those composers. The early 70's was a time of the "personal film" and the scores reflected that trend. However once the "blockbuster" returned so did "large scores". I have no problem with small personal scores for the appropriate style of film. But large action adventure/Sci Fi films benefit from broad classical treatments.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 9:39 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Well, I'm not sure solium... I suppose we might call LOGAN'S RUN a large-scale SF adventure, and it had one of Jerry Goldsmith's most exciting and adventurous scores - yet edgy and romantic, aggressive and modernistic all at the same time. I wonder how it would have sounded had it come out after STAR WARS. Maybe not very good examples, but I know what I mean.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 9:45 AM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)

I remember people complaining endlessly about how bad filmmusic had gotten back during the 90s. Looking back on it, there were a good number of tremendous scores that were produced in that era.

I have a feeling that in a couple years, people will realize that there's a lot of really good work being done now too. True, a lot of the old masters are either gone or retired, but I can think of at least 15 people who still score movies occasionally and who do excellent work, including Zimmer sometimes.

It's easy to say that the art has deteriorated, but that's not necessarily true... There are junky, pop-culture scores being written for movies, sure, but there always have been scores like that. Look around and see that there are plenty of big orchestral works like THE HOBBIT and LINCOLN and OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL and STAR TREK: INTO DARKNESS (which I don't even like!) being produced.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 9:49 AM   
 By:   Trent B.   (Member)

I tend to not blame the composers fault, but rather the director's...

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 9:55 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Well, I'm not sure solium... I suppose we might call LOGAN'S RUN a large-scale SF adventure, and it had one of Jerry Goldsmith's most exciting and adventurous scores - yet edgy and romantic, aggressive and modernistic all at the same time. I wonder how it would have sounded had it come out after STAR WARS. Maybe not very good examples, but I know what I mean.

Sure not all Sci Fi films need to sound like Wagner. Logan's Run much more than Star Wars was a product of its time. New age, disco, drugs, free love, etc. The film reflected those sensitivities.
Jerry did a great job in combining the other worldliness of electronics, with classical motifs. wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 9:59 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I remember people complaining endlessly about how bad filmmusic had gotten back during the 90s. Looking back on it, there were a good number of tremendous scores that were produced in that era.


I like many 90's scores. Those do not in anyway compare to the ambient noise made today.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 10:12 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

YOR has nothing against a good bombastic score.

Goldsmith's "The Mummy" comes to mind. Very bombastic, yet very complex and rich.

YOR also likes minimalist scores, such as the ones by John Carpenter.

YOR simple cannot stand these new scores composed in the Zimmer "style", that are all very poorly writen and performed, being bombastic or not (of course the bombastic ones are the worst and most movie-destroying).

YOR hopes that this trend ends soon and real good composers, such as Giacchino or Brian Tyler, prevail.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   Trent B.   (Member)

YOR has nothing against a good bombastic score.

Goldsmith's "The Mummy" comes to mind. Very bombastic, yet very complex and rich.

YOR also likes minimalist scores, such as the ones by John Carpenter.

YOR simple cannot stand these new scores composed in the Zimmer "style", that are all very poorly writen and performed, being bombastic or not (of course the bombastic ones are the worst and most movie-destroying).

YOR hopes that this trend ends soon and real good composers, such as Giacchino or Brian Tyler, prevail.


Well said. I too love good bombastic score. You gave a good example with The Mummy, another one is Independence Day.

Also with Turd (Man) Of Steel there really doesn't seem to be a centralized theme. At least with the Transformers scores (I know different composer) they had solid themes.

Hell even Zimmer's Pirates Of The Caribbean scores had some good themes to it. I'd rather listen to those than Turd Of Steel.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2013 - 10:21 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

Aside from Michael Giacchino and Alexandre Desplat, today's film music landscape is bleak and unforgiving. frown

 
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