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 Posted:   Jun 25, 2013 - 1:02 PM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

I recently purchased a cd by singer/actress Linda Lawson titled "Easy To Love" (Fresh Sounds Records FSR-CD 784)
It includes her album "Introducing Linda Lawson", a collection of standards arranged and conducted by Marty Paich. The orchestra is made up of a who's who of of LA jazz greats Jack Sheldon, Art Pepper, Bud Shank etc. Recorded in Hollywood at United Recorders on February 22, 26 and March 4, 1960.
Also included are 4 songs arranged for Ms. Lawson by Henry Mancini. The sessions, recorded September 23, 1957, at Capitol studio B were produced by none other that Norman Granz for his Verve label.
They were released on two Verve 45s.
The titles are:
"Somehow" (composed by Elmer Bernstein)
"More Than Ever" (composed by Mancini). This title is incorrectly listed as "More Than Never".
"Salty Salty Is The Sea"
"Never Like This"
The orchestra includes Ted Nash, Bob Bain, Rolly Bundock and Jack Sperling all of whom would play on "The Music From Peter Gunn" LP just a year later. They were regulars on Mancini's albums and scores for decades to come.

 
 Posted:   Jun 25, 2013 - 2:57 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

You lucky dawg! I have the mono version of Fresh Sounds previous release of "Introducing..."

I noticed the Mancini stuff, and while I'm eager to hear them, I'm still disappointed that no one has yet to release the arrangement he did for her to sing "The Meaning of the Blues" on the Peter Gunn TV show:

(at 1:48)



It's awesome!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2013 - 5:01 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I was lucky enough recently to find an original copy of his pre-Peter Gunn Liberty exotica LP "Driftwood and Dreams." This is easily available with its ugly reissue cover, "The Versatile Henry Mancini," but "Driftwood and Dreams" does not pop up too often.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2013 - 5:43 AM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

One that I have in my collection:

Lola Albright (Edie from Peter Gunn) had both of her two albums released on a CD titled "Soft Sounds". The first of the two original LPs included an orchestra arranged and conducted by Mancini and included the following songs: "Dreamsville", "Sorta Blue", "Soft Sounds" and "Slow And Easy".


Over half of the songs were NOT by Mancini, but he did all of the arrangements.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2013 - 8:12 AM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

One that I have in my collection:

Lola Albright (Edie from Peter Gunn) had both of her two albums released on a CD titled "Soft Sounds". The first of the two original LPs included an orchestra arranged and conducted by Mancini and included the following songs: "Dreamsville", "Sorta Blue", "Soft Sounds" and "Slow And Easy".


Over half of the songs were NOT by Mancini, but he did all of the arrangements.


Mancini also arranged an album for Edie Adams titled "Music To Listen to Records By" where she intentionally sang out of tune like Darlene Edwards who is really Jo Stafford. It was on MGM and produced by her husband Ernie Kovacs.
There's also "Terribly Sophisticated Songs: A Collection Of Unpopular Songs For Popular People".
These are 12 comedic songs composed by Irving Taylor and arranged by Mancini.
Taylor was a staff writer at Warner Bros. in the 60's. He wrote "Kookie, Kookie Lend Me Your Comb" recorded by Edd "Kookie" Byrnes and Connie Stevens. It was inspired by Byrnes character on "77 Sunset Strip" who was always combing his hair.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2013 - 8:38 AM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

Thanks. I hadn't heard of those two. I suppose I thought that Albright only made two LPs.

I actually have her album with Mancini on vinyl, but I bought it used and it's kind of scratchy, so I picked up the CD "2-fer" when it became available.

I love Albright's low-key swingin' style of vocals. Perfect for a lot of those early Mancini songs.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2013 - 10:16 AM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

One that I have in my collection:

Lola Albright (Edie from Peter Gunn) had both of her two albums released on a CD titled "Soft Sounds".

he did all of the arrangements.


The only stinky part of that release is that it's on cd-r. Plus I don't think anybody has done a stereo release of it, which I would love since Mancini was a great arranger.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2013 - 10:19 AM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

One that I have in my collection:

Lola Albright (Edie from Peter Gunn) had both of her two albums released on a CD titled "Soft Sounds". The first of the two original LPs included an orchestra arranged and conducted by Mancini and included the following songs: "Dreamsville", "Sorta Blue", "Soft Sounds" and "Slow And Easy".


Over half of the songs were NOT by Mancini, but he did all of the arrangements.


Mancini also arranged an album for Edie Adams titled "Music To Listen to Records By" where she intentionally sang out of tune like Darlene Edwards who is really Jo Stafford. It was on MGM and produced by her husband Ernie Kovacs.
There's also "Terribly Sophisticated Songs: A Collection Of Unpopular Songs For Popular People".
These are 12 comedic songs composed by Irving Taylor and arranged by Mancini.
Taylor was a staff writer at Warner Bros. in the 60's. He wrote "Kookie, Kookie Lend Me Your Comb" recorded by Edd "Kookie" Byrnes and Connie Stevens. It was inspired by Byrnes character on "77 Sunset Strip" who was always combing his hair.


Dang, dude - where were you when I had my thread about Mancini arrangements? You're an awesome source of info!

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=85037&forumID=7&archive=0

Thanks for the info about the Adams. I've been curious about it, and never knew it was a comedy recording.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2013 - 10:20 AM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

You lucky dawg! I have the mono version of Fresh Sounds previous release of "Introducing..."

I noticed the Mancini stuff, and while I'm eager to hear them, I'm still disappointed that no one has yet to release the arrangement he did for her to sing "The Meaning of the Blues" on the Peter Gunn TV show:

(at 1:48)



It's awesome!


LL's "Easy To Love" CD is on Ebay. One seller has 6 copies available. Reasonably priced at $13.00 plus shipping.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2013 - 4:32 PM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

One that I have in my collection:

Lola Albright (Edie from Peter Gunn) had both of her two albums released on a CD titled "Soft Sounds".

he did all of the arrangements.


The only stinky part of that release is that it's on cd-r. Plus I don't think anybody has done a stereo release of it, which I would love since Mancini was a great arranger.


The original vinyl was available in Stereo. I have a copy of that. But unfortunately it has a lot of pops and tics (bought from an ebay seller listing as 'like new' - yeah, right). I can't put my hand on my CD at the moment. I'll check. If mine is a CD/r that means I will want to rip the tracks to my backup drive. I've never met a CD/r yet that lasted over 10 years (except for those I did not want to keep). And I didn't realize that it wasn't stereo. One can only wonder why, since the original album was apparently recorded in stereo.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2013 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)


The original vinyl was available in Stereo. I have a copy of that.


Yes, I should have said "stereo release of it on cd". The Japanese mini is apparently mono (the liner doesn't have the stereo logo), too.


If mine is a CD/r that means I will want to rip the tracks to my backup drive. I've never met a CD/r yet that lasted over 10 years (except for those I did not want to keep).

That, I would do, yes. That label makes awesome choices in artists and then sticks us with a cd-r. I won't buy their product again.

And I didn't realize that it wasn't stereo. One can only wonder why, since the original album was apparently recorded in stereo.

Full disclosure: I'm assuming it's mono since the packaging lacks the stereo logo. (If it was stereo, why would they put it in the mono packaging?) Another reason to dislike this label is that it's impossible to find sound samples of their product!

So if you ever consider buying their version of their Janis Paige release, Bill, go for the Japanese release. It's factory-pressed.

 
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