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 Posted:   Jun 25, 2013 - 3:30 PM   
 By:   Hercule Platini   (Member)

ELYSIUM

Music Composed by
Ryan Amon

Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Newcomer Ryan Amon provides an aggressive and exciting score for orchestra and electronics.
...
Columbia Pictures will open ELYSIUM nationwide on August 8.

Varese Sarabande Catalog # 302 067 212 8
Release Date: 08/06/13

 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2013 - 1:09 AM   
 By:   David (Giacchino-fan)   (Member)







ELYSIUM

Music Composed by
Ryan Amon

Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

In the year 2154, two classes of people exist: the very wealthy, who live on a pristine man-made space station called Elysium, and the rest, who live on an overpopulated, ruined planet. The people of Earth are desperate to escape the crime and poverty that is now rampant throughout the land. The only man with the chance to bring equality to these worlds is Max (Matt Damon), an ordinary guy in desperate need to get to Elysium. With his life hanging in the balance, he reluctantly takes on a dangerous mission – one that pits him against Elysium's Secretary Delacourt (Jodie Foster) and her hard-line forces – but if he succeeds, he could save not only his own life, but millions of people on Earth as well. Written and directed by Neill Blomkamp, the creator of the modern sci-fi classic, District 9.

Newcomer Ryan Amon provides an aggressive and exciting score for orchestra and electronics.

Columbia Pictures will open ELYSIUM?nationwide on August 8.

Varese Sarabande Catalog # 302 067 212 8
Release Date: 08/06/13

Track List:

1. Heaven and Earth (4:27)
2. Fire Up The Shuttle (1:44)
3. Unauthorized Entry (4:35)
4. Deportation (1:54)
5. Darkness (4:49)
6. Things to Come (4:35)
7. You Said You’d Do Anything (3:29)
8. A Political Sickness (3:47)
9. Arming Projectile (1:25)
10. Zero Injuries Sustained (1:29)
11. I’d Like Them Dead (1:20)
12. You Have No Idea (2:11)
13. The Raven (1:57)
14. Let the Girls Out (2:07)
15. I Don’t Want to Die (1:35)
16. Matilda (2:52)
17. Step Aboard (2:53)
18. Heading to Elysium (1:53)
19. Keep Them Busy (:52)
20. When He Wakes Up (1:39)
21. We Do the Hanging (1:06)
22. Kruger Suits Up (2:25)
23. The Armory (:58)
24. I’m Right Behind You (:37)
25. Fire and Water (2:01)
26. The Gantry (1:08)
27. Breaking a Promise (3:17)
28. Elysium (3:44)
29. New Heaven, New Earth (2:22)

http://www.varesesarabande.com/servlet/the-1117/Elysium/Detail

 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2013 - 9:31 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

A new score from a new guy. I loved what Clinton Shorter did for this writer/director with District 9, I hope this one is just as good.

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 10:38 AM   
 By:   Lokutus   (Member)

I hope this one is much better than boring D9 but could hardly care less.
Samples are at colosseum and Amon will participate in DarkDel signing on 11/8.
so far it doesn't sound that bad, but still quite generic...



http://www.colosseum.de/product_info.php/info/p2741_Elysium--Ryan-Amon-.html

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2013 - 7:10 PM   
 By:   BackToTheFutureFan   (Member)

Just picked up this CD today only expecting your average Zimmer influenced electronic score. After first listen I have to say I really enjoyed it. A lot of of the electronics are really creative at times, almost experimental. I love the vocals, especially in the track "You Said You'd Do Anything" which is one of my favorites on the disc. Some of the electronics seem so avant garde that they almost sound organic. Standout tracks are Heaven And Earth, Things To Come, You Said You'd Do Anything, A Political Sickness, I Don't Want To Die, Matilda, Heading To Elysium, Breaking A Promise, and Elysium. While it does have some RC influenced percussive action cues, so many fun tracks makes this a keeper for me and makes me excited to see the film.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2013 - 2:19 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

Samples: Action music sounds very generic, some nicer bits in between. On the whole, not terribly interesting.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2013 - 4:30 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Same old same old. Film looks interesting though.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2013 - 4:55 AM   
 By:   BackToTheFutureFan   (Member)

The action pieces are definitely the same old thing but I think this score is more interesting than Oblivion was.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2013 - 6:24 PM   
 By:   Jon Broxton   (Member)

My review of ELYSIUM, if anyone is interested:

http://moviemusicuk.us/2013/08/06/elysium-ryan-amon/

Jon

 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2013 - 8:55 PM   
 By:   BackToTheFutureFan   (Member)

My review of ELYSIUM, if anyone is interested:

http://moviemusicuk.us/2013/08/06/elysium-ryan-amon/

Jon


You said it much better than I did. Been spinning this score nonstop for two days.

 
 Posted:   Aug 6, 2013 - 10:01 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

It may not be generic but a lot of the synthesizers used are typical of the modern sound. I wouldn't say any of the vocals used are particularly new or interesting either. Either way, finishing my first listen and it didn't particularly grab me.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2013 - 2:20 AM   
 By:   JamesSouthall   (Member)

My own review of this:

http://www.movie-wave.net/?p=3908

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2013 - 6:46 AM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

This was a very disappointing, contrived film with an uninspired, uninvolving score.

I wish I could say opposite this, but it truly was my reaction to it last night.

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2013 - 8:40 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

Chugga-chugga-chugga (BWAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH)

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2013 - 2:21 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

This was a very disappointing, contrived film with an uninspired, uninvolving score.

I wish I could say opposite this, but it truly was my reaction to it last night.


I thought the movie was good, though not fantastic. If you take away the sci-fi aspect, all the fun tech stuff, and cool action it becomes pretty bland and forgettable though.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2013 - 5:05 PM   
 By:   MusicMaker   (Member)

I posted this in another thread, but I think it is also relevant to this one, so I'm copy-pasting it here:


I found Ryan's Q&A answers at a guild screening last week to be very enlightening.

Ryan Amon composed many cues that included woodwinds and elaborate/intricate woodwind runs. Director Neil Blomkamp made it clear that he didn't like their inclusion. He also preferred the sampled/synth percussion that Amon used. Thus, the only live instruments are the strings and the brass (and the female vocals).

Additionally, it was Neil Blomkamp's idea and desire to use a solo "wailing" female voice. Ryan initially resisted the request, as he felt that the approach was cliché and overused, but Blomkamp continued to insist on these (supposedly for the "human" element), so Amon yielded and went with the flow (as would I in his position). Ryan decided to use these vocals in combination with a solo piano, which I think was a wise decision (a la Goldenthal on FINAL FANTASY) and helped to at least improve the situation.

Lastly, Amon said that he submitted nearly 200 cues for the film- almost NONE of which were composed to picture. He would fire off files of all different styles to Blomkamp and the editing team, who would start to place their favorites over sections of film. Amon said that he offered up synth cues, purely orchestral cues, hybrid cues, contemporary cues, classical-ish cues, sound-design-ish cues, melodic cues, etc. The style that you hear in the final film is definitely the direction that Blomkamp decided to go. Once this was determined, Amon then focused on that style for the rest of the score.

All this is to say that Amon did exactly what he was hired and directed to do. Which was a very smart thing to do for his first film, as it will ensure that it was not his last. He loved working with Blomkamp, and loved working on a film (he'd never done one before).

Do I like the score? Honestly, no. But I'd have done the same thing in Amon's place (well, not exactly the same thing, but you get the point). I don't dig the score, but for now I give Amon the benefit of the doubt when it comes to talent/ability. To have an informed opinion of Amon's ability as a composer, I'd need to hear a lot more of his work, and in very different circumstances.

 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2013 - 5:18 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

I saw the film yesterday and though I was very impressed with the film, the score did nothing for me. In fact, I found it quite distracting. It was as others have said, very generic and derivative. I'm not a full-on Zimmer basher, I quite like some of his work...but some of his influence has not been good and this is a perfect example of that. The whole orchestra playing power chords at full volume - constantly.

No argument that this is probably exactly what the director/producers wanted, but they shouldn't want it...it doesn't serve their film well at all.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2013 - 11:25 PM   
 By:   stay-puft   (Member)

I posted this in another thread, but I think it is also relevant to this one, so I'm copy-pasting it here:


I found Ryan's Q&A answers at a guild screening last week to be very enlightening.

Ryan Amon composed many cues that included woodwinds and elaborate/intricate woodwind runs. Director Neil Blomkamp made it clear that he didn't like their inclusion. He also preferred the sampled/synth percussion that Amon used. Thus, the only live instruments are the strings and the brass (and the female vocals).

Additionally, it was Neil Blomkamp's idea and desire to use a solo "wailing" female voice. Ryan initially resisted the request, as he felt that the approach was cliché and overused, but Blomkamp continued to insist on these (supposedly for the "human" element), so Amon yielded and went with the flow (as would I in his position). Ryan decided to use these vocals in combination with a solo piano, which I think was a wise decision (a la Goldenthal on FINAL FANTASY) and helped to at least improve the situation.

Lastly, Amon said that he submitted nearly 200 cues for the film- almost NONE of which were composed to picture. He would fire off files of all different styles to Blomkamp and the editing team, who would start to place their favorites over sections of film. Amon said that he offered up synth cues, purely orchestral cues, hybrid cues, contemporary cues, classical-ish cues, sound-design-ish cues, melodic cues, etc. The style that you hear in the final film is definitely the direction that Blomkamp decided to go. Once this was determined, Amon then focused on that style for the rest of the score.

All this is to say that Amon did exactly what he was hired and directed to do. Which was a very smart thing to do for his first film, as it will ensure that it was not his last. He loved working with Blomkamp, and loved working on a film (he'd never done one before).

Do I like the score? Honestly, no. But I'd have done the same thing in Amon's place (well, not exactly the same thing, but you get the point). I don't dig the score, but for now I give Amon the benefit of the doubt when it comes to talent/ability. To have an informed opinion of Amon's ability as a composer, I'd need to hear a lot more of his work, and in very different circumstances.


interesting. Hopefully he gets more creative freedom with his next project

 
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