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 Posted:   Jul 4, 2013 - 9:46 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

A fine writer, a good composer, a average singer. But very entertaining to listen to for a few hours. Don't over do it though. You may after awhile wonder why you are depress. He worked wonders for me during the tough times in life, between relationships, But now when I listen to his music I am so glad I have a love because some how when you do, it does not have the affect as when your alone. Matter of fact it can make you feel guilty if you feel with him when your with your love. One of the saddest songs I ever heard A SINGLE MAN, but with Rod he has a bunch of songs that could compete with that honor or award. But there is a calmness with his music, he makes us realize we are human and that is very important . Any comments?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2013 - 5:39 AM   
 By:   Ralph   (Member)

Did you bring back flashes of long forgotten memories! 1967’s “The Sea” was unaccountably in every college/university dorm room I ever entered. Thinking about the album, I remember now having used it to put me to sleep and it worked. I just checked PayPlay.com and the French version is available on mp3. Playing the samples is enough to forestall a purchase.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2013 - 11:03 PM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

Never understood the appeal of McKeuen.

He attended a screening I went to with my film critic older brother, for THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRODIE, and answered questions from the group afterward. (It was held at the old 20th Century Fox screening room, located at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice.in New York. Magnificent Art Deco, all stylized floral patterns in carved woodwork, painted in metallic colors. Went there a few years later, and some dolt had covered it all with the same boring beige paint. What a waste...)

Anyway, McKeuen spouted on about the score he'd written for BRODIE, which, even then, I thought was totally inappropriate for the story of the film, about how a self-centered schoolteacher ruins the lives of her students in the 30's. Maggie Smith got an Oscar for her performance, but the sentimental theme and song McKeuen wrote for it, though pretty in itself, just did not belong with such a story.

And I do remember when everybody in college seemed to have all of McKeuen's books and records.

Never got into it.

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2013 - 5:48 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

I was a big fan of McKeun's in the late 60s/early 70s. Some wonderful songs, gorgeous melodies and beautiful lyrics. Sadly, very much out of fashion now.

I just listened to a few of his songs on youtube and it reminded me that I really need to replace my old vinyl with CDs though wiki says that his old albums are being remastered and will be released in a box set. so it might be worth waiting.

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2013 - 6:58 AM   
 By:   Zambra Alex   (Member)

Must agree, one of a kind indeed.
Sometimes depressing, but few have ever put to song lonely sentiments as well as he did.
By the way Sinatra's "A man alone" is one of my favorite records.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2013 - 9:38 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)





Tho his achievements are legion and admirers many



- not least his forays into film music -



for us, his most luminous legacy are the concept albums he did



with Anita Kerr



that remain as remarkable and rich Now as when originally artistically birthed in their heavenly creative collaboration from the late 60s through the mid-70s. Invoking nature's seasons or the seasons of love, it's a hallmark in each's already stellar careers.



And why the magnificent Mme. Kerr is our second favorite composer (after Da Guv'nor)

).

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2013 - 11:51 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Funny, but there's been a lot posted here the past few days about Rod McKuen, principally on his film scores for movies like "The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie" and "Joanna." So whatever I will say will probably be redundant to anyone who already read what I added to those other posts. Sorry about that.

I first met McKuen at a big pool party in, I think, 1965, at the hilltop home of publicist Bill Waters, and it was to celebrate the release of the album "Rod McKuen Sings Rod McKuen." Back in those days you could go to the jukebox in bars and play music by singers like McKuen (songs like "I've Been To Town" and "The World I Used To Know"). They had played that new album repeatedly at the pool party, and I rushed out to buy it at a little record store on Melrose in West Holly- wood and loved it and would, over the next 10 or 15 years, buy dozens of his recordings and see him in concert. A big favorite was "The Sea," an LP I nearly wore out, and when it was finally released on CD, after buying it and bringing it home, I turned off all the lights and listened to it in the dark, and it hadn't lost any of the magic I had found in it so many years earlier. I have it on a playlist for my iPod, along with its follow-up, "Home To The Sea."

Now the redundant story. Several years ago I wrote McKuen a letter telling him how much his music had meant to me, and I bemoaned the absence of a CD of his terrific soundtrack for the quirky "Joanna." Now he didn't know me from Adam, but two days later a very bulky package arrived with almost a dozen of his CDs, including, miraculously, the "Joanna" soundtrack. Even better, there was almost twice as much music as was on the original soundtrack. Someone here pointed out that it was a Japanese import, which I disputed, but later pulled out the 16-page booklet that came with it, and, sure enough, there was more Japanese text than English. (The box from McKuen also included 12 more non-McKuen CDs, so there were over 20 compact discs in that manna-from-heaven package he sent me!)

Although I now have a wealth of his music on CD, I lament all the LPs never put on CD, such as his soundtracks for "Scandalous John" (or is it "Scandalous Sam"?) and "Me Natalie" and, also mentioned elsewhere, a lovely instrumental only recording of some of his best songs. He was indeed one of a kind.

All that I've been reading in the various posts here have led me to play more McKuen music this weekend than I've played in years, and it has been a delight. Going through my many CDs of his music, I was reminded that when I bought my first CD of "The Sea,"with it listed on the cover as "LA MER THE SEA" I figured that it was just a French import, and had been crushed to find all the text (read by Marc Ogeret) spoken in French, and it would be several years before it was finally released in the original English. Again, it's been such a treat reminding myself of how much joy I got out of his music. And I find that my Rod McKuen playlist has now exceeded 250 titles, although that DOES include "Joanna."

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2013 - 9:57 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I notice over the years many times when you spend time to write a sincere letter to somebody about how their talents brought many hours of enjoyment to you , they will send you a lot of nice free stuff. I know there is a lot of cynicism in this world for sure the world of Hollywood, but the truth is a lot of artists are sensitive inside [not all] but a lot and they are indeed touched when a stranger tells them how much their talents meant to them. Think about it even the hardest coldest heart will know that is the nicest thing one could hear from somebody. Making somebody feel worthy in life is the greatest thing you can do for someone. Artists like all people need this.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2013 - 8:22 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

I notice over the years many times when you spend time to write a sincere letter to somebody about how their talents brought many hours of enjoyment to you , they will send you a lot of nice free stuff..

Well, that was a first and only for ME. But I DID get a nice personal letter from actor/director Jerry Lewis several years ago. He was in town here in Hollywood, doing that musical ("Damn Yankees") where he plays the devil, so I thought I would write him and tell him how I had fallen in love with his LP "Jerry Lewis Just Sings" when I was a teen and later, as a young marine, had re-bought it to have a better copy of it. I also told him that I had seen him standing outside the Beverly Hills theatre that was premiering the Julie Andrews film "The Sound of Music" and had wanted to walk over and tell him how much I had loved that album, but didn't have the courage. He was delighted that someone remembered him as a singer, and a few years later they brought it out on CD and I bought it again. Another time I wrote Doris Day a letter and she sent a very sweet handwritten card. Yes, some of them can be quite nice ... but, as you wrote, not all. Thanks.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2013 - 8:22 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

deleting duplicate post

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2013 - 4:19 PM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

One of my favourite Rod Mckeun songs

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2013 - 11:29 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

What do you think of Rod McKuen's own version of it? I realize that he has a notoriously scratchy voice -- frankly, I've been told that my own voice, higher than what I hear when I hear it, reminds some of McKuen -- that pales in comparison to a Sinatra. But I found myself squirming just now as I listened to Frank, wishing it was McKuen instead of Sinatra. What do YOU think of McKuen's version of that song?

 
 Posted:   Sep 20, 2013 - 10:53 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Incidentally, I wish the person who posted this, dan the man, could correct his spelling of the name -- it's McKuen, with so many here following that misspelling when they posted their own replies. Just a thought.


.... MC KUEN .... MC KUEN .... MC KUEN .... MC KUEN .... MC KUEN .... MC KUEN .... MC KUEN .... MC KUEN ....


Ahhhhhhh ... dan! Looks like you did it! I didn't know if we could edit our titles as well as our text, but it looks like we can. Thanks for doing that!!!!!!!

Ron

 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2013 - 6:55 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

What do you think of Rod McKuen's own version of it? I realize that he has a notoriously scratchy voice -- frankly, I've been told that my own voice, higher than what I hear when I hear it, reminds some of McKuen -- that pales in comparison to a Sinatra. But I found myself squirming just now as I listened to Frank, wishing it was McKuen instead of Sinatra. What do YOU think of McKuen's version of that song?

I really like Mckuen's version. He's voice, initially, took a little getting used to but he sings with a lot of passion and warmth.

 
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