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 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:21 AM   
 By:   Clark Wayne   (Member)

Perhaps someone can give me an idea-I have the reissued LaLaLand BTAS Vol 1 and original Vol 2 with the autographed booklets.

They are nice to have and all, but as times are hard, and I have the unsigned versions as well, I wondered if anyone could give me an idea if these would be worth anything?

Although I do collect some celebrity autographs, I would think composer's autographs are a fairly narrow field of interest!

Has anyone sold any before? Can you give me an idea if they are worthwhile holding onto instead?

Please-no bids or begs-this is purely out of interest-not soliciting.

Thanks

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 6:01 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

It dependes.

A booklet autographed by YOR worth a lot.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 6:07 AM   
 By:   mstrox   (Member)

Just a guess, but I'd say they'd only make you a few bucks each, if that. Autographs from bigger (or deceased) composers may make you a bit more, but I'm not convinced that the market is huge, except for your own personal or sentimental value.

I have a fairly big collection of them now - all from LLL, except for a Danny Elfman/Corpse Bride signature from some promotion with some retailer at the time of release, and I think maybe a few rock artists from similar promos. They're stored nicely in some envelopes for now, and I may collage or frame my favorites eventually when I have walls I'm not just renting

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 7:20 AM   
 By:   Dyfrynt   (Member)

Unfortunately there is little collectible value to composer signatures. As you suggest, the target market is tiny. Plus few composers have made it large enough in the public eye so that Joe Public even knows who they are.

Only one I could find quickly was John Williams, surely the composer of composers in the world today. His autograph is selling for $50 to $75. A signed photograph selling for roughly $100. Though these are asking prices, so not even sure those values are realistic or not.

Couldn't find values on any other composer at all. Sorry, man.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 8:05 AM   
 By:   facehugger   (Member)

What's the point in buying a composer's signature if you don't get them to sign it personally for you?

This is why there is no big market massproducing celebrity signatures with the latest photocopy technology.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

A composer's autograph is worth something to anyone who values the composer.

A signed booklet is a treasure to those folks.

An inscribed booklet, however, is not as valuable to collectors as the signed one.

For instance, it may mean something to Peter to have a thousand CD booklets inscribed "To my Good Friend Peter, Hans Zimmer".

To Robert, who wants Zimmer's autograph, it's not as valuable as a booklet that reads "Regards, Hans Zimmer".

Robert is not named Peter, so it's "somebody else's" treasure...not Robert's.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:48 PM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

What's the point in buying a composer's signature if you don't get them to sign it personally for you?

This is why there is no big market massproducing celebrity signatures with the latest photocopy technology.


I have a copy of "Touch Of Evil" that reads "To My Friend Roy...Hank" followed by his drawing of a treble clef on the booklet.
No way I'd ever part with it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 9:00 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....An inscribed booklet, however, is not as valuable to collectors as the signed one.

For instance, it may mean something to Peter to have a thousand CD booklets inscribed "To my Good Friend Peter, Hans Zimmer".

To Robert, who wants Zimmer's autograph, it's not as valuable as a booklet that reads "Regards, Hans Zimmer".....



This can be true, however an autograph inscribed to its recipient is almost always guaranteed to be authentic, and not a forgery.

My favorite story, although not about composer autographs is about one autograph I found for sale on eBay.

The seller was offering a genuine autographed photo of actress Hedy Lamarr. Because Lamarr was a very iconic screen beauty, and her autograph rarer than some, he was promoting this as special.

When I pulled up the photo on the site, it was an 8x10 glossy, not of Lamarr, but of actress Dorothy LAMOUR! That would have been OK, it it had been autographed by Lamour.

But, in his zeal to sell it for more money, he had first mis-identified the photo as Lamarr, and then hand-autographed it himself as "Heady Lamour!!!" A totally confused and illiterate seller!

I thought it was hysterical! I should have bought it!!!

Over the years I've worked with many famous people, and often had them sign something for me, usually with an inscription. Some are now quite valuable. But I have also done something which I think makes them more valuable AND gives them a back-story. I usually write the circumstances of the autograph---where signed, when signed, and under what circumstance---and any little story pertinent to the signature signing at that moment---what did the signer say, did he/she like the photo, poster, film?---what was the reaction to the article signed? I write this on a small card and keep it in an envelope attached to the back of the photo. This gives the signature a personalization and historical provenance that might be of interest to a future buyer or collector even though the inscription is not to them---particularly if the inscription is also to someone famous by someone famous.

An inscription by John Williams to Steven Spielberg would likely be more valuable than a simple anonymous signature by Williams---because it is authentic, and has a back-story attached.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 10:00 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Some are worth more then others. but for sure they are worth more then a non autograph book, it only lifts the value, for sure if YOR SIGNS IT- [HA-HA]

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 6:41 AM   
 By:   losher22   (Member)

I sell some of my CDs on Amazon, and of the very few I've posted for sale that had an autograph, they've sold almost instantly. So I couldn't necessarily put a dollar value on an autograph, but could say that among fans of this little niche they're highly sought after!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 7:36 PM   
 By:   Smaug   (Member)

Signatures with inscriptions are worth more than just plain signatures? I always thought it was the opposite. I would see things signed "To Deborah, best wishes So and So" and say to myself that I would never want that.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 8:45 PM   
 By:   ChristianK├╝hn   (Member)

It depends. About half of the autographed covers I have are personalised, some of them with a few lines of text, even though I hadn't acquired them from the composer in person.

My favourite is still the one from David Arnold:

"To Christian - Beware of the message boards. Best Wishes, David Arnold"

big grin

On an autographed PR photo from an actor in my favourite TV show he actually commented on my eloquent writing (???) and wished me good luck for my PhD. Not only was I over the moon that the guy replied, but that he had actually read my letter to him.

Ah, good times.

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 8:48 PM   
 By:   drivingmissdaisy   (Member)

They aren't worth anything that is why I have no issue taking them off your hands so I can properly dispose of them....into my collection smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 9:54 PM   
 By:   drivingmissdaisy   (Member)

A composer's autograph is worth something to anyone who values the composer.

A signed booklet is a treasure to those folks.

An inscribed booklet, however, is not as valuable to collectors as the signed one.

For instance, it may mean something to Peter to have a thousand CD booklets inscribed "To my Good Friend Peter, Hans Zimmer".

To Robert, who wants Zimmer's autograph, it's not as valuable as a booklet that reads "Regards, Hans Zimmer".

Robert is not named Peter, so it's "somebody else's" treasure...not Robert's.


Well said Ron, "is worth something to anyone who values the composer." I love these guys and gals and getting a memento really means something. Now as time happens and a composer is no longer with us, the collector/completist in me comes out and I want a Jerry Goldsmith signed goodie and I don't care who it's made out to. Luckily I rectified that recently. It's a fun little hobby which has opened up, oddly enough, some HUGE HUGE doors and I have met some absolutely fascinating people along the way.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 1:16 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

It's definitely easier to sell them and an investment of sorts depending on the score and composer. I've built up a small collection of mostly horror scores I got signed or bought online (darkdel, la-la, ebay, ...) and cherish the ones I got in person or via contact with the composers. I had them displayed on my wall but after I painted my wall recently I'm still debating wether to put them back up or store them more safely in a folder.

Regarding signed booklets on ebay, I advise to ALWAYS look for other examples of the signature on google and compare them. You can easily tell when the hand writing doesn't match, there will always be a giveaway in the details. I'm not 100 % sure but I suspect some sellers on ebay try to up the price of a score they'd otherwise sell much lower by quickly scribbling something down. Also ALWAYS ask for background info regarding the signature.

P.S. I've also gotten some great autographs via American, German & British members on this board so definitely keep an eye out on the trading post for good deals!

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 7:37 PM   
 By:   Guy   (Member)

I usually write the circumstances of the autograph---where signed, when signed, and under what circumstance---and any little story pertinent to the signature signing at that moment---what did the signer say, did he/she like the photo, poster, film?---what was the reaction to the article signed? I write this on a small card and keep it in an envelope attached to the back of the photo. This gives the signature a personalization and historical provenance that might be of interest to a future buyer or collector even though the inscription is not to them---particularly if the inscription is also to someone famous by someone famous.


I like the way darkdel include a little print out of the date it was signed and the names/pages where people have signed. Always useful for the folks who can't be there in person.

 
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