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 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

THE WONDER YEARS is, on YOR's humble opinion, the best TV show of all times.

Yes, even better than STAR TREK or THE HERCULOIDS!

YOR cannot say how many times he cried watching the show!

Amazing how a show for USA citizens can touch people from other countries too!

There are so many good episodes, but the highlights to YOR are:

1) The first one, of course

2) The one Kevin get in love with his gorgeous teacher

3) And the last episode - YOR cried like a baby at the end speach!

YOR wonders why the show was never released on DVD or Blu Ray.

Maybe something to do with the rights for all the songs they used?

Or another reason?

Anyone knows?

And who elses love it too?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 4:43 PM   
 By:   TheFamousEccles   (Member)

It is, as far as I'm aware, entirely related to music clearance issues.

And yes, I wish the series was available, too - it was such a charming, delightful show, with a very strong emotional core at its center.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 4:58 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

It is, as far as I'm aware, entirely related to music clearance issues.

Precisely. Music-heavy shows like this and "WKRP in Cincinnati" have huge clearance issues.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 4:59 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

I'm glad I videotaped most of my favorite WONDER YEARS eps back in the 1990s during its syndication run.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 4:59 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

But how they managed to use those songs on the show?

What is the diference between showing on TV and releasing it on DVD?

YOR does not know that...

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:02 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Puny green-haired man with girly necklace does not know!

muwahahaha ;-)

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

But how they managed to use those songs on the show?

What is the diference between showing on TV and releasing it on DVD?

YOR does not know that...


Back in the day, music rights were only cleared for the initial broadcast versions of episodes. Released in any other format (i.e. DVDs), and you have to pay those music rights again, and for a such a period music-heavy program as The Wonder Years, the costs would be prohibitive. Sometimes they can't even secure music rights for the syndicated reruns. These days, they smartly plan ahead and secure music rights for ALL future format releases.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:08 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

That's also the reason why sometimes a episodes of TV shows on DVD may replace the original song heard in syndication, with another song, or new underscore.

Imagine how unhappy fans of b[]"Quantum Leap" where when the song Al and his wife dance to in the episode "MIA", was replaced.

I also recall some "Miami Vice" music replaced.


But another bad thing to watch out for is when somebody doesn't care what they put out and it's shoddy in more than one day. For example:

"ALF" on DVD featured the edited syndication runs.
And the quality of "Due South" looks better on Youtube than the Canadian DVD release.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:11 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Mr. Jack has it. The songs were cleared for broadcast only, because at the time, nobody could have anticipated that a television show would have any life other than broadcast. It was a big hit show, and they could afford the music. And any song that wound up being too expensive, they wouldn't use.

To put them on DVD as they were originally broadcast, every single one of those songs would have to be cleared again, and for a much smaller (less profitable) market. And of course the publishers of those songs would have extra leverage, because they know the fans demand the episodes as they originally aired. The studio was tied to them now, and could not jettison an expensive one.

Music rights are, of course, a negotiation, and depending on what you're willing to spend, and what the publisher can demand, you can buy rights for a limited (say, two-year) window, rights in perpetuity, rights in a specific region (say, North America), rights for a specific medium (say, broadcast), or a combination platter of any of these.

Several years ago, a composer friend of mine got the gig to replace all of the songs in "21 Jump Street" with his own compositions. And they gave him about a week to do it!

It is often painful when you have to replace a song for home video, but it's a necessary evil. In an episode of television I once did, the song "My Girl" at the emotional climax of the show was replaced by a generic song we owned called "There Goes My Baby." A poor substitute, but the economics made it necessary.

In other cases, a popular song is dictated by the network, and the producers are just as happy to lose it, because it was never what they wanted in the first place. Still, the fans are never happy about it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:17 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

One of my girlfriend's favorite shows and she can't understand why it is not on DVD.I only saw a few episodes in my life. But there are a lot of people who of course loved the show.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:31 PM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

Hated this with greatest American hero in DVD. Rocket man crucial to pilot. Eve Of destruction Barry McGuire critical to operation spoilsport. So critical show music and cues interwoven into song.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:34 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

I remember an episode of Cheers where Sam kept playing the song "I Fought The Law, And The Law Won" on a boombox (hey, it was the late 80's) as a musical punchline to Rebecca's rich boyfriend, Robin Colcord[sp?], getting in tax trouble with the government, but the DVD replaces it with a generic substitute, essentially ruining the intended joke. Also later DVD seasons of Married...With Children had to replace the "Love And Marriage" song over the opening credits because they couldn't cough up the money to pay the rights anymore. And not even underscores are exempt (witness the Fugitive DVD brouhaha). Certain short-lived shows, like Freaks & Geeks, have paid through the nose to secure rights to ALL of the period music included in the original broadcasts, and that's why the complete series set is so expensive.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:41 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

There was actually an episode of Newsradio titled "Public Domain", because Phil Hartman's Bill MacNeal took to playing political-themed songs, all based on the melodies of songs from the Civil War era that are in the "public domain", i.e. you can use them and it won't cost you a cent (that's why so many TV commercials use classical music instead of licenced songs). Ironically, one song you'd think was public domain, "Happy Birthday", you actually do have to pay for the rights to, which is why you often hear "humorous" substitutions in movies and on TV.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 6:21 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Certain short-lived shows, like Freaks & Geeks, have paid through the nose to secure rights to ALL of the period music included in the original broadcasts, and that's why the complete series set is so expensive.

Does anyone else think that Freaks & Geeks was one of the best-written, most natural shows on TV? (I'm talking to the 3 or 4 people who saw it--you know who you are). Incredible that the biggest crap goes for years and a show like that folds after--what?--one season.

Wonder Years--yes, great show.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 10:33 PM   
 By:   Burk Whittenburg   (Member)

It wouldn't matter to me if they used new music (from the same time period, at least) if it meant getting this out on DVD. It's been so long since I've seen The Wonder Years, I wouldn't remember a single song from any of the episodes anyways (except the song in the opening credits). It's a crime this hasn't been released on DVD

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 11:00 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

Wonder Years is currently streaming on Netflix and I believe Amazon's service.

However in the first two seasons, there's six or seven songs obviously replaced with library substitutes. One of them is definitely a Hendrix song replacement - it sounds exactly like him in the way that the DVD theme redo on Married With Children still sounds like Love & Marriage by Sinatra. And like Married With Children, the streaming edits have a generic cover of "With a little help (from my friends)" as one assumes the Joe Cocker cover costs a lot of money.

Thankfully, 95% of the music is untouched, so when Kevin breaks up with Winnie at the museum, "God Only Knows" still plays. They definitely dished out a LOT for the music licenses to stream this stuff and hopefully that means its even closer to disc.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 11:13 PM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

I watched the show as a kid and I liked it, but watching it again now than I'm older, I can see just how fantastic it really is.

Most of the time, music replacement doesn't bother me. With The Wonder Years, however, the music was such an important part, practically another character itself within the show, that having it all would be of vital importance to me.

On a related note, I recently drove by the house used as Kevin's home, and I swear it has not changed one bit over the years.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 11:23 PM   
 By:   Josh Mitchell   (Member)

Certain short-lived shows, like Freaks & Geeks, have paid through the nose to secure rights to ALL of the period music included in the original broadcasts, and that's why the complete series set is so expensive.

Does anyone else think that Freaks & Geeks was one of the best-written, most natural shows on TV? (I'm talking to the 3 or 4 people who saw it--you know who you are). Incredible that the biggest crap goes for years and a show like that folds after--what?--one season.


My then-girlfriend Holly and I watched Freaks & Geeks religiously on TV during its original run and really dug it. We were disappointed and downright flummoxed when it was cancelled. It was a great show.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 12:05 AM   
 By:   DavidCorkum   (Member)

Honestly, don't you think that when a song is used in a TV show or a movie, it's tantamount to Free Advertising? Nobody is watching the show for the song, they're hearing the song as a bonus. The artists should be paying the studios to use their songs and get more exposure. Instead, they demand so much money for themselves that the product becomes financially unviable. The songs get cut, and the artist's gateway into social awareness is decreased. If nobody can hear a song at all without paying for it in advance, who's going to want to?

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 9:03 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Great insights, people!

YOR is happy!

And, hey, no Hmazimmer bashing here, yes?

big grin

 
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