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 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 9:11 AM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Puny green-haired man with girly necklace does not know!

muwahahaha ;-)


YOR always tought that Justin was a gril's name.

Like in Justin Beeber.

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 9:55 AM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Honestly, don't you think that when a song is used in a TV show or a movie, it's tantamount to Free Advertising?

No. Realize, like anything, this is a negotiation. And there are circumstances where an artist will provide a song very cheaply for just the reasons you state. (Typically, though, this also requires a card at the end of the show naming the song and artist and saying that it's available in stores or on iTunes. Otherwise, the song would forever remain "that song by that guy they used in that scene.")

It all comes down to who needs who more. Generally, the show needs the song more, not because anybody tunes in to hear a specific song under dialogue, but because the song brings some value to the show that will keep people hooked and tuning in every week.

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Would not be nice if all those composers or representatives charged very cheap just to make easier for THE WONDER YEARS to be released on DVD and Blu-Ray?

What a wonderful world it would be...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 2:36 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

And there's the case with "Life Goes On" because the series had The Beatles' "Ob Li Di, Ob La Da" that was sung by the series' cast, but was was replaced by an undistinguished generic sounding because the publishers wanted a bigger piece of the royalties. Is this the reason that Warner Home Video (or even the Warner Archive Collection) has yet to release the remainder of the series on D.V.D. (only Season 1 was ever released).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 6:45 PM   
 By:   DavidCorkum   (Member)

It all comes down to who needs who more. Generally, the show needs the song more, not because anybody tunes in to hear a specific song under dialogue, but because the song brings some value to the show that will keep people hooked and tuning in every week.

The situation seems similar to the re-use fee problem that soundtracks had for many years. There should be some expectation of profit from a given product, and fees for rights should fit reasonably within the limits of expected profits to be fair to all parties. If a product is expected to make $700,000, rights for a song should not be $1,000,000. There should be a legal guideline. Plus the integrity of artwork needs protecting. The situation is forcing the alteration or suppression of existing works.

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2013 - 10:49 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

There should be some expectation of profit from a given product, and fees for rights should fit reasonably within the limits of expected profits to be fair to all parties. If a product is expected to make $700,000, rights for a song should not be $1,000,000. There should be a legal guideline.

But who could establish this legal guideline? Whose job would it be to determine how much somebody should be paid for something he created or something he owns? And how would this be done?

Should this person also determine how much you should be paid for your house? Or a piece of artwork you own?

And, for that matter, should he tell you that you must sell it, even if you don't want to?


Also… if anybody knew what the "expected" profit on anything would be, that would be a miracle. Of course, nobody knows. Just look at the box office numbers from last weekend. Plus, nobody trusts anybody. And the studios have hidden profits for so long (this is documented), why would anybody trust them?

I should also point out that, while I know you were pulling numbers out of the air, song rights do not go for a million dollars. Most are in the $8K to $10K range (depending on how it will be used), though it can be anything. Because if you own something, you are free to ask whatever you like for its use. Or you may choose not to sell it at all, for any reason you like.

 
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