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 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 7:35 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Hi,

This won't be news to all, but it was amazing for me at least to stumble across old newsletters published between 1944 and 1950, and which can be read on PDF files on-line. It's almost like reading the print copy of FSM had it been written all those decades ago - everything from "who's doing what" to in-depth interviews and comments about scoring procedures, some of it incredibly in-depth. Fascinating to see stuff like this. I was going to give examples of just how fascinating, but better to just go there yourselves. I could spend an entire week wading through all those gems.

It's all at ASMAC (American Society of Music Arrangers and Composers). I hope this link works...

www.asmac.org

If you get there, go to "Archives", which will lead you to "The Score - Historical Newsletters".

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 9:14 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Thanks for posting this, Graham. It's fascinating.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 9:32 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

There are bits of film (music) literature from the early days that are fascinating to read. Like Kurt London's FILM MUSIC (1936), T. Scott Buhrman's "Photoplay De Luxe" (1920), Adorno and Eisler's COMPOSING FOR THE FILMS (1947) and loads of others. Many of the observations seem selfevident and self-explanatory today, but at the time they were trying to come to grips with the artform and the musical function within.

I haven't read those newsletters yet, but they're probably in a more 'mainstream', less academic style that are equally interesting for their own reasons. What's happening in the biz etc.

Thanks for the heads-up, Graham. Will read soon.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 9:55 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

You're welcome, Ron.

Thor, I think the difference here between the literature published in book form that you cite and those old newsletters is that in this case, to me at least, it really does seem to be like reading FSM fifty years before. Here's just one of millions of tidbits (I'm paraphrasing here) -

From 1944 - "Walter Scharf has finished scoring DONOVAN'S BRAIN..." - (already I was thinking, wasn't that a '50s movie?) - "... which will have its title changed to THE MONSTER... " (it actually became THE LADY AND THE MONSTER) - "The composer used a highlighted woodwind section for maximum eerieness, plus very specific microphone placing to achieve the desired effect."

It brings the past very much into the present. I'm really loving what I'm reading.

Here's another, from the "Letters" section - "I found your first issue most informative. Thank you." (Signed - Daniele Amfitheatrof).

Hope you all have as much fun and healthy enlightenment as I'm having!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 10:02 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Agreed. I've read some now. They are neat 'time capsules'.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 10:55 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Wow! What a treasure trove. Thanks and it is wonderful to see Jeannie Pool, whom I remembered from The Society for the Preservation of film Music events so long ago, still at the forefront of activity. That anniversary event must have been a doozie! I didn't know Van Alexander, composer for both Mickey Rooney and William Castle, was still around! FFM please take heed!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

This is an excellent resource!! How do I enlarge the print on the "newsletter" of 1944?

I didn't know Robert Russell Bennett had written a symphony!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 12:07 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

Hi,

This won't be news to all, but it was amazing for me at least to stumble across old newsletters published between 1944 and 1950, and which can be read on PDF files on-line. It's almost like reading the print copy of FSM had it been written all those decades ago - everything from "who's doing what" to in-depth interviews and comments about scoring procedures, some of it incredibly in-depth. Fascinating to see stuff like this. I was going to give examples of just how fascinating, but better to just go there yourselves. I could spend an entire week wading through all those gems.

It's all at ASMAC (American Society of Music Arrangers and Composers). I hope this link works...

www.asmac.org

If you get there, go to "Archives", which will lead you to "The Score - Historical Newsletters".




A fabulous "new" old resource for us!

Thanks so much for posting this site, Graham.

This material is important because it was written, first-hand, as it was happening---not as later "revisionist" history in academic books about films and scores and players.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 12:14 PM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

That's my feeling too, manderley. There's a kind of old "newsreel authenticity" to it all which makes it very immediate.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 1:19 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Great find, Watt! I intend to take a look a little later. I love reading older stuff like this.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2013 - 2:50 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

F*****G INCREDIBLE!!!!

Finally the Paul Smith Music in Animated Cartoon articles are available. I always heard of them. Now ... a reality. Very very sweet.


Here is a quick list of some interesting notes from the first 6:
- Friedhofer "Overture to a Comedy" 44-01
- Copland arranger; Lincoln Portrait music at Preeman 44-01

- Russ Garcia doing staff work at NBC 44-02
- Amfitheatrof letter 44-02

- First of many Paul Smith (Disney) articles on animation and music 44-03
- Deutsch "The Mask of Dimitrios" 44-03

- Paul Whiteman in AC 44-04
- Kern "Can't Help Singing" 44-04
- Tansman scoring "Since You Went Away" 44-04

- Heindorf Overture for "Rahpsody in Blue" 44-06
- Steiner "Since You Went Away" 44-06
- "Kismet" has oriental flavor 44-06
- Newman "Wilson" score 44-06
- Amfitheatrof "With All My Heart" 44-06

 
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