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 Posted:   Jul 26, 2013 - 11:57 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

I've expressed my desire to see this score released in more than one thread...usually to the sound of crickets.
I've asked if anyone knew the tapes were available or not and not one person has ventured to state if they knew for certain or even make a guess. Maybe that's a good sign....or not.

Anyway, I just realized that 20th Century-Fox has finally made this Jacques Tourneur film with its exciting Sol Kaplan score available on DVD in its Cinema Archives Collection (previously only a Spanish Region 2 was released). I just got my copy. It's a bare-bones presentation with no extras or subtitles, but it looks good. It's beautifully photographed and the Argentine locations (and the gorgeous Gene Tierney) look fabulous.

I was very happy to hear the score again for the first time in decades. It's not a very long score but what there is of it is choice. The main title is one of the most rousing curtain openers you could hope for and the theme is perfect for "galloping across the pampas" scenes. Despite its brevity there are several different themes for romance and action. This would be a good title for inclusion on a CD with another short score or two from 20th Century-Fox. (Kritzerland??????)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 2:35 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Here's a snippit of the score:



 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Very nice. Of course, it's Kaplan but it has the "flavor" of Newman, especially Captain from Castile. I would love to see Bruce do THREE CAME HOME , THE GUNFIGHTER, and A LETTER TO THREE WIVES. Perhaps in a tribute CD to Jean Negulesco, Henry King and Alfred Newman.

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 11:41 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

If it really sounds anything like Newman's Captain from Castile I am THERE! (Plus, I like Sol Kaplan anyway)

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 3:05 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

If it really sounds anything like Newman's Captain from Castile I am THERE! (Plus, I like Sol Kaplan anyway)

Yavar


Well, of course, NOTHING sounds like CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE, one of the greatest scores ever. But there is a certain amount of similarity. Both have that Spanish/South American exotic flavor and feature exciting rhythmic cues. It is interesting that the credit card reads:
Musical Supervision
ALFRED NEWMAN

Music By
SOL KAPLAN

That's probably more an indication of how things were done back then, rather than an indication of any direct contributions by Newman to the score. The score doesn't seem to have any of Newman's stylistic flourishes....just the high level of quality that Newman's supervision brought to 20th Century-Fox.

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 3:08 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Well, of course, NOTHING sounds like CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE, one of the greatest scores ever. But there is a certain amount of similarity. Both have that Spanish/South American exotic flavor and feature exciting rhythmic cues.

Yeah....SIGN ME UP!

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 3:58 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)


A great Sol Kaplan cd: Way of a Gaucho with Kangaroo. Bruce, hint, hint.

I always thought Kaplan's early 50s Fox scores sounded like Alfred Newman, same with early 50s Alex North at Fox. That's a good thing!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 7:35 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Very nice. Of course, it's Kaplan but it has the "flavor" of Newman, especially Captain from Castile. I would love to see Bruce do THREE CAME HOME , THE GUNFIGHTER, and A LETTER TO THREE WIVES. Perhaps in a tribute CD to Jean Negulesco, Henry King and Alfred Newman.

I meant to end the last sentence above with director's name Joseph Mankiewicz not Alfred Newman.

 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 3:39 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

I have never seen KANGAROO but just discovered that you can watch the whole movie from a link on its IMDB page.
I didn't watch the whole thing yet but if the main title is any indication, this is another terrific Kaplan score.

A Kritzerland release called "Sol Kaplan at 20th Century-Fox" would really make me dance a jig. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 5:16 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Thanks for that posting,Ray. I also never saw KANGAROO until now. I agree completely. WAY OF THE GAUCHO and KANGAROO would make an excellent double bill on CD. I hope Bruce sees this.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 8:07 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Thanks for that posting,Ray. I also never saw KANGAROO until now. I agree completely. WAY OF THE GAUCHO and KANGAROO would make an excellent double bill on CD. I hope Bruce sees this.



Hi Cody, I suggested it first! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 8:42 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Very happy to take to come in second, PFK. We both can hope that this will come to pass.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 8:52 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Very happy to take to come in second, PFK. We both can hope that this will come to pass.


Great minds think alike! smile

As I mentioned on the Kritzerland film noir topic, a friend of mine suggested this to me a few months ago. It would make a fine cd. About 1966 I tapped off tv some of the Way of the Gaucho music with my trusty Sony reel to reel tape recorder. Maybe nearly 50 years later I will get the cd?

Bruce, are you taking this all in? smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 5:37 AM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)


About 1966 I tapped off tv some of the Way of the Gaucho music with my trusty Sony reel to reel tape recorder. Maybe nearly 50 years later I will get the cd?

Bruce, are you taking this all in? smile


Wow! I did the exact same thing around the same time. I've transferred that WAY OF A GAUCHO music from reel-to-reel, to cassette, to CDR, and now have it on my iPod (along with a few other vintage unreleased tracks like Bernstein's RIVERBOAT that I taped from TV) . Crummy sound, but that magnificent main title shines through.
With all the great Golden Age releases in the last few years, I've retired a lot of those old tape recordings as the CDs came out. KINGS OF THE SUN, KING OF THE KHYBER RIFLES, TOBRUK, WAR WAGON and many others I had on straight off TV recordings and now I'm enjoying the CDs.

I hope to add WAY OF A GAUCHO to that list someday.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 12:58 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)


About 1966 I tapped off tv some of the Way of the Gaucho music with my trusty Sony reel to reel tape recorder. Maybe nearly 50 years later I will get the cd?

Bruce, are you taking this all in? smile


Wow! I did the exact same thing around the same time. I've transferred that WAY OF A GAUCHO music from reel-to-reel, to cassette, to CDR, and now have it on my iPod (along with a few other vintage unreleased tracks like Bernstein's RIVERBOAT that I taped from TV) . Crummy sound, but that magnificent main title shines through.
With all the great Golden Age releases in the last few years, I've retired a lot of those old tape recordings as the CDs came out. KINGS OF THE SUN, KING OF THE KHYBER RIFLES, TOBRUK, WAR WAGON and many others I had on straight off TV recordings and now I'm enjoying the CDs.

I hope to add WAY OF A GAUCHO to that list someday.



Hi Ray, I agree with your posts and enjoy reading them. I'm turning 67, guess you are near that age too. Younger fans may not know that back in the 60s, 70s etc. the only way to get this golden age music was to hook up a reel to reel recorder to your tv. I did mostly main and end titles, but also did record some from the film too. Never thought 50 years later I would get great sounding cds of scores from the 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s etc.

In the 60s and 70s I hunted down all the LPs of scores, I somehow managed to get them all! Figured that was that. I bought a Sony reel recorder in 1966, went to Radio Shack and got a cord with alligator clips on one end and attached it to the speaker inside the tv, then the other end went right into the recorder. Pretty high tech huh? Those were the days.

I first noticed film scores around 1954. In 1956 my older brother bought the LP to Around the world in 80 Days, in 1957 he bought Rodgers' Slaughter on 10th Ave. In 1961 I tapped part of Salter's Frankenstein meets the Wolfman off tv. In 1964 I started to buy ST LPs. In 1956 The Ten Commandments' music impressed me a lot. But it was The Magnificent Seven in 1960 that made me a big film music fan. You, and others, probably have the same type story too. Well, next year will be 50 years since my first ST LP! ...... Peter smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 4:21 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)



Hi Ray, I agree with your posts and enjoy reading them. I'm turning 67, guess you are near that age too. Younger fans may not know that back in the 60s, 70s etc. the only way to get this golden age music was to hook up a reel to reel recorder to your tv. I did mostly main and end titles, but also did record some from the film too. Never thought 50 years later I would get great sounding cds of scores from the 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s etc.

In the 60s and 70s I hunted down all the LPs of scores, I somehow managed to get them all! Figured that was that. I bought a Sony reel recorder in 1966, went to Radio Shack and got a cord with alligator clips on one end and attached it to the speaker inside the tv, then the other end went right into the recorder. Pretty high tech huh? Those were the days.

I first noticed film scores around 1954. In 1956 my older brother bought the LP to Around the world in 80 Days, in 1957 he bought Rodgers' Slaughter on 10th Ave. In 1961 I tapped part of Salter's Frankenstein meets the Wolfman off tv. In 1964 I started to buy ST LPs. In 1956 The Ten Commandments' music impressed me a lot. But it was The Magnificent Seven in 1960 that made me a big film music fan. You, and others, probably have the same type story too. Well, next year will be 50 years since my first ST LP! ...... Peter smile


Hi Peter,

You got a couple of years on me (I'm 63) but our experiences are pretty close. I bought as many LPs as I could afford on my limited pre-teen and teen budget but so many things were unreleased.
Also, without the internet, tracking down out-of-print LPs was extremely difficult (not to mention often beyond my price range). So, yeah, I hooked my tape recorder with alligator clips to the TV speakers and got lots of main & end titles. Sometimes I recorded as much of the score as I could...
I remember doing Goldsmith's THE PRIZE, Jarre's GAMBIT, and lots and lots of STAR TREK, among many others.
(Speaking of Sol Kaplan, one of my favorite STAR TREK scores was his "Doomsday Machine") As you can imagine it was almost beyond belief to get that wonderful box set of all that STAR TREK music I had painstakingly recorded from TV over 40 years ago.

Interestingly, my first awakening to soundtrack music was also THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. I think I was around 11 when I saw it and I just HAD to get that theme on record. Of course, there was no such animal, except as an Al Caiola re-interpretation on an LP from UA called "Great Motion Picture Themes". I saw an ad for it for the Columbia Record Club, joined, got a copy and was hooked by all the other cool soundtrack music on the LP. My first complete soundtrack album was THE GUNS OF NAVARONE...followed quickly by LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, THE BIG COUNTRY, BEN-HUR, and EL CID. And boy was I happy when a couple of years later, the soundtrack for RETURN OF THE SEVEN was released on LP and I could finally get that MAGNIFICENT SEVEN music in its (mostly) original form. I never could get all the scores I wanted that were on LP, but happily, that has been remedied by the CD re-issue boom and now I'm just enjoying getting the stuff that never saw a release in any form. I'm also happy to be spoiled rotten by the concept that virtually any new movie I see whose score I find interesting is probably going to have a CD release. smile

I've been obsessing over WAY OF A GAUCHO recently because it is probably my one true holy grail left. There were many others but most of them have been satisfied recently. There is plenty I would like but none with quite the same degree of desire.

Ray

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2013 - 7:57 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)



Hi Ray, I agree with your posts and enjoy reading them. I'm turning 67, guess you are near that age too. Younger fans may not know that back in the 60s, 70s etc. the only way to get this golden age music was to hook up a reel to reel recorder to your tv. I did mostly main and end titles, but also did record some from the film too. Never thought 50 years later I would get great sounding cds of scores from the 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s etc.

In the 60s and 70s I hunted down all the LPs of scores, I somehow managed to get them all! Figured that was that. I bought a Sony reel recorder in 1966, went to Radio Shack and got a cord with alligator clips on one end and attached it to the speaker inside the tv, then the other end went right into the recorder. Pretty high tech huh? Those were the days.

I first noticed film scores around 1954. In 1956 my older brother bought the LP to Around the world in 80 Days, in 1957 he bought Rodgers' Slaughter on 10th Ave. In 1961 I tapped part of Salter's Frankenstein meets the Wolfman off tv. In 1964 I started to buy ST LPs. In 1956 The Ten Commandments' music impressed me a lot. But it was The Magnificent Seven in 1960 that made me a big film music fan. You, and others, probably have the same type story too. Well, next year will be 50 years since my first ST LP! ...... Peter smile


Hi Peter,

You got a couple of years on me (I'm 63) but our experiences are pretty close. I bought as many LPs as I could afford on my limited pre-teen and teen budget but so many things were unreleased.
Also, without the internet, tracking down out-of-print LPs was extremely difficult (not to mention often beyond my price range). So, yeah, I hooked my tape recorder with alligator clips to the TV speakers and got lots of main & end titles. Sometimes I recorded as much of the score as I could...
I remember doing Goldsmith's THE PRIZE, Jarre's GAMBIT, and lots and lots of STAR TREK, among many others.
(Speaking of Sol Kaplan, one of my favorite STAR TREK scores was his "Doomsday Machine") As you can imagine it was almost beyond belief to get that wonderful box set of all that STAR TREK music I had painstakingly recorded from TV over 40 years ago.

Interestingly, my first awakening to soundtrack music was also THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. I think I was around 11 when I saw it and I just HAD to get that theme on record. Of course, there was no such animal, except as an Al Caiola re-interpretation on an LP from UA called "Great Motion Picture Themes". I saw an ad for it for the Columbia Record Club, joined, got a copy and was hooked by all the other cool soundtrack music on the LP. My first complete soundtrack album was THE GUNS OF NAVARONE...followed quickly by LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, THE BIG COUNTRY, BEN-HUR, and EL CID. And boy was I happy when a couple of years later, the soundtrack for RETURN OF THE SEVEN was released on LP and I could finally get that MAGNIFICENT SEVEN music in its (mostly) original form. I never could get all the scores I wanted that were on LP, but happily, that has been remedied by the CD re-issue boom and now I'm just enjoying getting the stuff that never saw a release in any form. I'm also happy to be spoiled rotten by the concept that virtually any new movie I see whose score I find interesting is probably going to have a CD release. smile

I've been obsessing over WAY OF A GAUCHO recently because it is probably my one true holy grail left. There were many others but most of them have been satisfied recently. There is plenty I would like but none with quite the same degree of desire.

Ray



Hey Ray, Thanks for the reply. I see it was The Magnificent Seven that got you into film scores too. I just pulled out my Return of the Seven LP from 1966! I was so happy that UA put this out. In the 60s UA LPs had a great amount of film scores, I too started buying the UA movie themes in 1964. I'm not sure what full ST LP I bought first, maybe How the West Was Won. Like you, The Guns of Navarone was one of the first. Elmer had a lot of LPs in the 60s so I played him the most.

Anyway, it sure is hard to believe we are getting cds to scores we never thought possible. I hope you get your holy grail of Way of A Gaucho. Hey, I'll buy it too! smile Peter

 
 Posted:   Mar 11, 2014 - 12:15 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Listening to that posted clip again in the wake of Intrada's Spy Who Came In From the Cold announcement. I hope THIS is the next Kaplan score to get a release!

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 11, 2014 - 12:37 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Yes, WAY OF A GAUCHO , KANGAROO and JUDITH are the 3 that I would love to see released on CD soon.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 11, 2014 - 2:13 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Yes, WAY OF A GAUCHO , KANGAROO and JUDITH are the 3 that I would love to see released on CD soon.



I concur with this! smile

 
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