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 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 9:57 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

Over the last couple of years, I've found a few albums in my collection don't want to rip properly. I've tried all sorts of error correction programs like Apple's ITunes or EAC and even on different computers (I bought a laptop last week, in fact). However, a handful of discs - towards the end of the album - become nothing but artifacts and clicking; I can even hear the disc drive struggling to read it.

I had originally thought that I'd gotten bad discs but I actually have a couple copies of one of the offenders (one on the shelf, one signed by the composer, and one I had sent back to the label as we thought it was just a bad disc - but the replacement had the same problem) and they all do the same thing. The last handful of tracks: one will click a little, the next more and then the last track is unlistenable.

Any one out there have a similar issue and any suggestions on what to do?

 
 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 10:13 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

If you're using EAC, first of all: Is the "Offset" detected automatically the right one for your drive? You can check this online. The automatic detection isn't 100% foolproof.

If the last tracks on a CD won't read properly, there's a strong indication of a bad pressing, or disintegration of your CD over time (PDO, anyone?). Both happened to me many, many times (Deutsche Grammophon, Unicorn, Hyperion, John Scott Records). If the latter, there's nothing you can do. On those PDO bronzing CDs the last tracks were ALWAYS the ones not to be playable/readable any more first.

Also, check your drive. If you can play a CD with no problems on your standalone CD player, but it still won't rip properly on your drive, than almost certainly the drive is malfunctioning.

Also, try CDEX for ripping. This program is a lot more forgiving on ripping problematic CDs. If it rips OK, but the result will still show skips and plops, then it's the CD, or the drive, but not the software.

I know that you can reduce the ripping speed on several programs, but, frankly, that won't help you. Correctly working CD drives can rip undamaged CDs at MAXIMUM speed.

 
 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   Stefan Huber   (Member)

I think this mostly occurs when there's plenty (too much?) music on the disk. I had it happen with some soundtrack CDs, but the "notorious" ones in my collection are anthologies by Bear Family. Some of them have content close to 90 minutes - a bit much compared to the original 74 minute limit. Some of them have difficulties on the closing tracks - others (particularly older pressings!) will have the problems all the way through...

 
 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 11:19 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I found the same thing, when making some compilations from the "ST:TNG" box from FSM, the last cues from one of the discs, would not rip properly, and they play bad, too.

Another way this, if the CD plays fine, but just doesn't rip properly, is to simply use a program, like Audacity, and record it as it plays. It's time consuming, but it works.

 
 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 11:24 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

BK recently said something about being a little nervous incorporating close to 80 mins on Kritzerland CDs. I had a CD/DvD drive which worked fine until I overburned a CD one day. I can still use it to view films, load software etc, but it's days of burning holes are over. I had initially thought about trashing it outright but it's now been entrenched in the machine for several years and has always worked faithfully - as long as it's read only. So I can say from experience that getting awfully close to centre is just as bad as gimbal lock. smile

I've always wondered how the separation between the data encapsulated parts of a CD/DvD can work the closer you get to the hub, because it has to be more compressed there than at the outer rim. It strikes me the laser needs to be more focused on the inside than the outside because of the critical distances between sectors. I've had a look inside one of these drives and it has always puzzled me that they work along fairly simple mechanical principles (exactly the same lines as with a record layer), yet the actual precision they are required to have in order to work reliably is quite phenomenal. Just a slight blemish in the lens used to focus the laser can probably cause a behaviour trait peculiar in any specific machine.

Also, I'm inclined to think that the embossed covering 'topside' can sometimes affect the laser's reflections while tracking. Whether it's due to minute differences in the contouring/relief due to artwork materials right through to the specific spectral absorption qualities of the colouring used in artwork design has also left me wondering. There must be a fair bit of reseach out there on this very matter.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 25, 2013 - 10:45 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

I've never found a correlation between trouble ripping and CD length -- even discs that are over 80 minutes (and I have a fair bunch of them).

 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 1:25 AM   
 By:   shicorp   (Member)

I've never found a correlation between trouble ripping and CD length -- even discs that are over 80 minutes (and I have a fair bunch of them).

That's interesting. I always thought that this was the problem since my "shorter" Bear Family CDs will rip just fine.

 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 10:02 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

Another way this, if the CD plays fine, but just doesn't rip properly, is to simply use a program, like Audacity, and record it as it plays. It's time consuming, but it works.

Is Audacity free to own or is it shareware?

 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 10:36 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

It's free.

http://audacity.sourceforge.net/?lang=en

 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 10:51 AM   
 By:   Trent B.   (Member)

It's rare I had this happen. You could try Audiograbber which is one program I've been using for the last several years.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 10:57 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

If the CD itself plays back fine, just doesn't want to rip, you can usually get a clean rip using 'burst mode' on the CD drive selection of EAC. Using Audacity (or whatever) to do a 'what you hear' recording is a horrible choice and really doesn't get you a good rip at all (for various reasons).

 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   mstrox   (Member)

This happened to me with several albums in my collection on multiple computers/drives (always on iTunes)-

Varese, The Other Boleyn Girl
Varese, LOST Season 4
Silva, The Essential Horror Music Collection (one of the discs)
Warner, Inception

Varese sent me a second copy of LOST S4 after I e-mailed them, and I had the same problem with that disc, too. With this, the Silva disc, and Inception, I managed to make acceptable playing tracks by copying again, and again, and again, until somehow it made it through without any audible pops or skips.

I actually bought a second copy of The Other Boleyn Girl (was only $3 at Family Dollar) and had the same problem. No matter of ripping and reripping would fix the offending tracks, so I ended up picking them up on iTunes.

 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Audacity is a great free program. I use it all the time. You can record audio as it's streaming live from the internet, radio, Youtube, your microphone, whatever.


The only downside is the preset options need to be adjusted. I cant' speak for the current version of Audacity, but when I got it, it came set to mono recording, and other low quality features. I had to re-adjust everything. I had to also mess with the computer volume controls, 'cause if you don't have certain things muted, you can record background noise, or get nothing when recording from online.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 11:08 AM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Audacity is a great free program. I use it all the time.


Me too. I love it.
And EAC. (But swear to God, sometimes the data that comes from freeDB... just a little retarded. I always end up inputting the info myself.)

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 4:46 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)


And EAC. (But swear to God, sometimes the data that comes from freeDB... just a little retarded. I always end up inputting the info myself.)



Sometimes it's downright hilarious trying to figure out what drugs the inputter was on. You think it's bad with film scores, you should see some classical stuff.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2013 - 4:53 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Sometimes it's downright hilarious trying to figure out what drugs the inputter was on. You think it's bad with film scores, you should see some classical stuff.


Definitely. And, yeah, I've seen many examples of freeDB's classical inputs. I mean, to be generous I guess one should say that they deserve some credit for trying, but, holy cow...!
Gotta be drugs. Or OCD. Or both? (No offense to the OCD people here--I have a touch of it.)

Anyway, sorry for the off-topic, OP.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2013 - 10:02 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

[Album] - -
[Artist] - Herbert von Karajan
[Genre] - Blues

But all replay gain, encoding and itunes flags are filled.

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2013 - 11:52 AM   
 By:   Scott H.   (Member)

dbPowerAmp's CD Ripper is by far the best ripping program out there.

Check it out.

 
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