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 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 7:01 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

I really like the song "Just Give Me a Reason" by Pink, but after the clean-sounding opening piano notes, a faint scratchy noise comes in under the music and stays there until the song is almost over. It ruins the song for me and I can't stand the fact that it was obviously done deliberately as an artistic choice in post production.

If I remember correctly (I'm not at home now), a similiar thing was done to the Kelly Clarkson song "The Trouble with Love Is."

True, the Beatles and some other groups long ago used certain effects once in a while, like simulating 1940's sound quality for portions of a song, but it was done with good sense, usually to be cute-- never with a nails-on-a-chalkboard mentality where the intention is to irritate.

Ruining the sound quality of a song is analogous to Miley Cyrus dispoiling her cute image with harsh make-up, her tongue hanging out, and an ugly grimace on her face. Why is ugly the new "in" thing? It makes me sick.

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 7:10 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Along the same lines, it drives me nuts when bands destroy their albums with compression creating distortion. It makes some otherwise solid albums un-listenable.

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 7:16 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

I feel the same way about people who wear deliberately torn articles of clothing.

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 7:38 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Yes ugly is "in". Everything is ugly. I hate it. Ugly, gross, dark, dirty is considered hip and real nowadays. Has been for over ten years. On my death bed I want to watch videos of flowers, deers in meadows, sun sets all while listening to classical music.

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 7:41 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

On my death bed I want to watch videos of flowers, deers in meadows, sun sets all while listening to classical music.

I'm sure you'll make an excellent source of protein and calcium, as will I. big grin

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 7:45 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

On my death bed I want to watch videos of flowers, deers in meadows, sun sets all while listening to classical music.

I'm sure you'll make an excellent source of protein and calcium, as will I. big grin


I figured someone would pick up my point of reference. wink

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 8:09 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

This is, as with other things in life, an example of how an artists can't see the difference between a work of art and a statue of Jesus covered in shit, but they still think they are the same.

When done right, you get something of quality like these instrumental works:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioDcGjwu988
and to a slightly lesser extent: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KIbsRp7hvQ

And a song like this (which samples another song):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XJxFAoiWSY

(by the way, I'd advise to not purse any of their other song; truely a one-hit wonder if there ever was one)

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 9:09 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

I figured someone would pick up my point of reference. wink



If there's an afterlife, I hope all the "furniture" there is "like grapefruit."

 
 Posted:   Oct 6, 2013 - 9:35 PM   
 By:   The Projectionist   (Member)

The first thing that came to mind is Hans Zimmer amplifying a synth effect so much to the point that it sounded like a speaker blew out in Man of Steel. It was not cool and took me out of the music.

Trevor Jones used a filtering effect in From Hell that briefly made the music sound like it was playing from an antique phonograph.

 
 Posted:   Oct 7, 2013 - 12:02 AM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

Trevor Jones used a filtering effect in From Hell that briefly made the music sound like it was playing from an antique phonograph.

If it's brief rather than relentless, that might be a good addition of texture in a period horror film.

 
 Posted:   Oct 7, 2013 - 3:41 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Monkees did this in 1968 with their song "Magnolia Simms", where they attempted a 1920s sound, complete with scratchy and skipping phonograph. They had to write a blurb letting dopey 1960s teens that it was intentional.

 
 Posted:   Oct 7, 2013 - 4:43 AM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

The Monkees did this in 1968 with their song "Magnolia Simms", where they attempted a 1920s sound, complete with scratchy and skipping phonograph. They had to write a blurb letting dopey 1960s teens that it was intentional.

...whereas if they had done it today, they would have had to answer to an army of screaming fanboys, and termed it a "Deliberate Creative Decision", and had to justify on about 13,000 web pages why they did it, and secretively leak the untouched-sessions-in-96kbs-as-that's-the-best-they-had, and issued an apology, and said they had to use the audio stems from the DVD as their recordings had actually gone missing in Paris, and then apologised for having existed in the friggin' first place.

 
 Posted:   Oct 7, 2013 - 5:32 AM   
 By:   Metryq   (Member)

In video, all the artifacts that a generation of engineers fought to overcome are now "special effects." You can get plugins to create film grain, hair in the aperture, melting film, etc. One can also add flicker and color adjustments that look like old dyes. Video artifacts are also chic: frame roll, poor off-air reception, scan lines, etc. Let's not forget the "found footage" ShakyCam(TM).

And where would we be without the comic "Zoop!" of a needle being unceremoniously dragged off an LP? Retro is in. (Along with self-hatred.)

On the other side of the aisle are those who must see everything colorized, extruded into 3D, or remade/rebooted simply because the FX technology is "better" now.

Style, not substance.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 7, 2013 - 7:14 AM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

Re: The Monkees - "Magnolia Simms"

Yes, they even panned the whole thing over to one speaker on the "stereo" pressings of THE BIRDS, THE BEES AND THE MONKEES, to emphasize the mono, old-fashioned feel.

 
 Posted:   Oct 8, 2013 - 6:39 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

Along the same lines, it drives me nuts when bands destroy their albums with compression creating distortion. It makes some otherwise solid albums un-listenable.

There's good distortion: analogue tube amps cranked above their design specification, the sound that gave birth to heavy metal; and there's bad, digital distortion with a dynamic range squashed so the music can skirt the 0dB line all the time.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 8, 2013 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

That would be the score to Gravity right?


 
 Posted:   Oct 8, 2013 - 8:31 AM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Along the same lines, it drives me nuts when bands destroy their albums with compression creating distortion. It makes some otherwise solid albums un-listenable.

There's good distortion: analogue tube amps cranked above their design specification, the sound that gave birth to heavy metal; and there's bad, digital distortion with a dynamic range squashed so the music can skirt the 0dB line all the time.


Yeah, I'm mostly talking about digital distortion. But almost as bad is heavy digital compression.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 8, 2013 - 8:33 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

Distortion is like, sophisticated right? Or supposed to be. I am not sure why that is.

I like a couple Brian Eno uses of distortion, there is a British DJ named Tipper that made an album called Surrounded which uses distortion. I liked that one very much. It is odd, but 5.1 sound and really interesting.

 
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