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How to Marry a Millionaire (1953)
Music by Cyril Mockridge, Alfred Newman
How to Marry a Millionaire How to Marry a Millionaire
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $14.96
Limited #: 3000
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Golden Age
CD Release: March 2001
Catalog #: Vol. 4, No. 2
# of Discs: 1

FSM is digging deep into the stereophonic vaults at 20th Century Fox and there is no better place to start than the first CinemaScope feature to be shot (and second to be released), the 1953 widescreen comedy How to Marry a Millionaire, starring Marilyn Monroe, Lauren Bacall and Betty Grable as glamorous New York models in search of rich husbands.

In order to introduce CinemaScope's wide image and stereophonic sound, Alfred Newman conducted the tuxedo-clad Fox orchestra on-screen in a 5:36 suite from his 1931 score to Street Scene—the quintessential New York movie tune. This prologue stands as a monumental tribute to Newman's stature at Fox and in Hollywood—that a studio would choose to introduce its new technology in such a fashion. We have remixed and remastered Newman's recording of "Street Scene" from the original six-track magnetic film stems for the best possible sound.

For the body of How to Marry a Millionaire, the lion's share of scoring duties fell to Fox workhorse Cyril Mockridge, a veteran composer and arranger responsible for many of the most memorable renditions of Alfred Newman's themes. Millionaire was in many ways treated as an "instrumental musical" by Newman, Mockridge and the rest of the Fox staff, comprised of indelible arrangements of pop standards of the day ("How About You," "You'll Never Know," "I've Got a Feelin' You're Fooling" and many more) with connective tissue by Mockridge. The main title, "New York," was a pre-existing song by Lionel Newman and Ken Darby, and Alfred Newman contributed an original theme for the character of Hanley, played by William Powell.

This CD of How to Marry a Millionaire features the complete music recorded for the film in stereo including source music and unused cues. The booklet contains complete breakdowns of the songwriters represented and the orchestrators and arrangers utilized: Edward Powell, Bernard Mayers, Alexander Courage, Leo Arnaud and the legendary Nelson Riddle, who contributed several big band charts. Overall the CD is an irresistible, indelible representation of the period's popular music, of Hollywood's colorful glamour, and of the peerless playing by the Fox orchestra under Alfred Newman.

Cyril Mockridge Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Cyril Mockridge (1896-1979) was an English composer and arranger and an indispensable member of the Twentieth Century-Fox music department under Alfred Newman in the 1940s and '50s, where he scored dozens of films in all genres (including classics like Miracle at 34th Street), but for the most part specialized in lighter fare that were collaborative assignments—a perfect example being the Marilyn Monroe film How to Marry a MillionaireIMDB

Alfred Newman Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Alfred Newman (1901-1970) is one of the most important figures in the history of movie music, a nine-time Oscar winner (with 45 nominations overall) who was head of music at Twentieth Century-Fox in the 1940s and '50s. His influence as a composer and executive cannot be understated; he invented the "Newman System" of synchronizing music to picture and is the patriarch of the Newman family of composers and musicians (Lionel, Randy, David, Thomas and others). Just a sampling of his work as a composer includes How Green Was My Valley, Captain From Castile, All About Eve, The Robe and The Diary of Anne FrankIMDB

Comments (24):Log in or register to post your own comments
It's simply unbelievable that this CD hasn't sold out after nearly eight years! Alfred Newman and Cyril Mockridge provide a swingin' score based on original material and standards from the great american songbook. Newman reprises his score for the 1931 "Street Scene", Lionel Newman and Ken Darby provide a hymn to the city of "New York" and a young Nelson Riddle has arranged striking versions of 1941's "How About You" and 1935's "I've Got A Feelin' You're Foolin'". If you are into swingin' scores from the 1950s and 1960s, you should definitely not let this go. This beautifully remastered album is a testament to a great time that (never was or) never will be again...

all that he said.

It's a peach. Worth price of admission alone for the Newman Fox Orchestra "STREET SCENE' prelude.

shicorp is on the money on this one. This is overdue for a respin in the cd player.


This is a great release by FSM.
All you guys who don't already have it...
buy one TODAY!
the sound is fantastic, and you won't be disappointed.

Lionel Newman and Ken Darby provide a hymn to the city of "New York"

This is a swell song and arrangement.

I'll be singing it the first time I step out onto the streets of NYC, someday. Complete with hand motions and choreography.

The cue that closes out the film- after the 3 girls faint seeing the wad of dollar bills Cameron Mitchell is carrying at that diner, and realize who he is, is superb.

"Gentlemen- to our wives!"

I totally agree that it is amazing that this CD has not yet sold out. It has long been one of my favorites...subtle and mellow, sometimes upbeat and sometimes dramatic, and always appealing.

I totally agree that it is amazing that this CD has not yet sold out. It has long been one of my favorites...subtle and mellow, sometimes upbeat and sometimes dramatic, and always appealing.

With some beautiful adaptations of Standards from the Great American Songbook.

Oops, sorry Shicorp, you already mentioned that..

The cue that closes out the film- after the 3 girls faint seeing the wad of dollar bills Cameron Mitchell is carrying at that diner, and realize who is, is superb.

"Gentlemen- to our wives!"
.... steve, u are so right , gets me every time, the happiest shortest cue,,that i wish would go on and on.

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Track List
Instruments/Musicians
Click on each musician name for more credits

Leader (Conductor):
Alfred Newman, Lionel Newman

Violin:
Victor Arno, Sol Babitz, Israel Baker, Robert Barene, George Berres, Henry Camusi, Joachim Chassman, Dave Crocov, Adolph DiTullio, Peter Ellis, David Frisina, Benny Gill, Anatol Kaminsky, Murray Kellner, Eugene Lamas, Marvin Limonick, Paul Lowenkron, Marion McKinstry, Marshall Moss, Irma W. Neumann, Alex Pierce, Joseph Quadri, David Selmont, Paul C. Shure, Felix Slatkin

Viola:
Edgardo A. Acosta, Myer Bello, Donald A. Cole, Joseph DiFiore, Alvin Dinkin, Louis Kievman, Alex Neiman, Robert Ostrowsky, Sven Reher

Cello:
Joseph Coppin, Joseph DiTullio, Armand Kaproff, Raphael "Ray" Kramer, Leonard Krupnick, Kurt Reher, Harold Schneier

Bass:
Abraham Luboff, Peter A. Mercurio, C. Magdelano Rivera, Meyer (Mike) Rubin, Alex Walden

Flute:
Luella Howard, Barbara Moore (Putnam), Sterling D. Smith

Oboe:
Arnold Koblentz, William Kosinski, Gordon Pope

Clarinet:
Russell Cheever, Charles Gentry, Arthur Herfurt, Glen Johnston, Edward R. Miller, Abe Most, Ted Nash, Babe Russin, William A. Ulyate

Bassoon:
Don Christlieb, Arthur Fleming, Glen Johnston

French Horn:
Alfred Brain, Wendell Hoss, Sinclair Lott, Alan I. Robinson, Harry Schmidt, Gene Claude Sherry

Trumpet:
Frank Beach, John Clyman, Jack R. Coleman, Conrad Gozzo, Manny Stevens

Trombone:
Daniel D. Cerilly, Marlo Imes, Ray Klein, John Tranchitella, Lloyd E. Ulyate

Tuba:
Clarence Karella

Piano:
Urban Thielmann, Raymond Turner

Organ:
Chauncey Haines

Guitar:
Vito Mumolo

Harp:
Anne Stockton (Mason)

Drums:
Richard Cornell, Paul DeDroit, Edgar Forrest, Preston Lodwick, Cameron Maus, Harold L. "Hal" Rees

Orchestra Manager:
Simon Waronker

© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.