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Cain’s Hundred (1961)
Music by Jerry Goldsmith, Morton Stevens
Cain’s Hundred Cain’s Hundred
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $19.95
Limited #: 3000
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Silver Age
CD Release: July 2009
Catalog #: Vol. 12, No. 14
# of Discs: 1

From the early years of Jerry Goldsmith’s sterling career comes a forerunner of his popular “crime” style (as heard on films such as The Detective and L.A. Confidential): Cain’s Hundred, a little-known, above-average 1961–62 television series starring Mark Richman (later known as Peter Mark Richman) as a tough-minded attorney methodically taking down America’s most infamous figures of organized crime.
 
The series was one of two Goldsmith scored in 1961 for producer Norman Felton (beginning a long-running relationship that would include The Man From U.N.C.L.E.)—the other was Dr. Kildare, and Goldsmith used his given name “Jerrald” on both productions. As was his pattern, Goldsmith wrote the series theme and scores for the first few episodes before departing for other projects; the entirety of his recordings (save one cue deteriorated beyond use) is presented here in clean monaural sound from the original scoring masters.
 
Cain’s Hundred features a grim and moody sound befitting the darkness of the criminal underworld—with flashes of light for the innocent characters trapped therein. Goldsmith blended blues and militaristic influences in what Hugo Friedhofer called “federal music” for the driving series theme. As with almost all of the composer’s television work, the underscores bristle with the invention, exciting modernist effects and emphasis on melody that would make him one of the greatest film composers of all time—and especially groundbreaking in the 1960s.
 
FSM’s premiere CD of the Cain’s Hundred television soundtrack features Goldsmith’s four episode scores and title music—including a different arrangement of the theme created for the pilot (which was aired midway in the series’ run). Filling out the disc is a Morton Stevens score for a subsequent episode in which Stevens re-recorded and slightly adapted Goldsmith’s title music. Liner notes are by television music authority Jon Burlingame.
 
Jerry Goldsmith Scores on FSM
About the Composer

What to say about Jerry Goldsmith (1929-2004), the reason so many of us are soundtrack collectors in the first place? The Los Angeles native knew early on he wanted to write music for the movies, had an extensive training in television in the 1950s (starting at CBS), and went on to an unparalleled career in the movies—capable of brilliance in every genre, and beloved by his peers and fans. FSM has released as many of his scores as we could get our hands on, from classic TV work like The Man From U.N.C.L.E. to famous features (Patton) and obscure gems like The Illustrated Man and 100 Rifles...heck, make that all of them. Jerry, we love you and miss you! IMDB

Morton Stevens Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Morton Stevens (1929-1991) was a veteran film and primarily television composer who wrote the famous theme to Hawaii Five-0 and contributed episode scores to all manner of classic shows, including Thriller and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. He was a friend of Jerry Goldsmith's and had a similarly modern orchestral style on many projects; he completed the scoring of the miniseries Masada when Goldsmith was unavailable. In addition to his work as a composer, Stevens was head of music at CBS' West Coast operations (a lengthy stint that began in 1965) during which time he oversaw the scoring of many notable series. IMDB

Comments (7):Log in or register to post your own comments
What can I say, another great release of Goldsmith's superlative 60s TV music (Morton Stevens' as well). This music is bigger than the "little screen" and is another testament to the great music that was being written by some of our greatest "film" composers for TV back in the 50s-60s. I think a new category for "Age" should be given to the late 50s and early to mid 60s TV scoring era, not sure what that would be though. This is great music no matter the medium and there was a lot of it back in those days.

TV music of this quality should not be looked down upon simply because it was written for what many think of to be the supposedly inferior small screen. Many a time it's just the opposite which was the case then just as it is now.

FSM has championed this music recently and I personally hope to see more of it. Not to diminish this release in any way with the inevitable "This is a great release, but what about so and so?", but I now have higher hopes for Goldsmith's (along with Pete Rugolo's and Morton Stevens') Thriller music someday being made available now that we're starting to see these types of releases. Rights issues and/or availability of sources notwithstanding.

Great moody, dark, angst ridden and at times jazzy music to an unknown to me old TV series. Yet another big thank you to FSM! Keep 'em coming!

If John Rambo's father was a crime-fighting, crusading lawyer, Cain's Hundred would be Papa Rambo's theme. This would make for a nice introduction for the young Goldsmith fan wanting to hear Jerry's earlier sounds with more than a touch of future triumphs.

I'd love to see the actual TV show with Goldsmith's music in context.

I kind of bought this CD on a whim when I had some extra cash, and it blew me away. This disc is full of classic Goldsmithisms and was a gripping listen from start to finish!

I agree with Swashbuckler - Cain's Hundred is thumbs up great and you get to hear primo Jerry Goldsmith and Mort Stevens as well!

This and "Dr. Kildare" are the greatest things FSM has released in a long time. Jerry rules!

Opening titles with guest stars Jack Lord and Charles Bronson:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzdsC77gmUU[/youtube]

I wonder if Leonard ever gets asked about his time on Cain's Hundred?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVIWvOm9Q8c[/youtube]

I'm attempting to revisit some CD'S that are collecting dust on my shelf. I forgot how excellent these Goldsmith scores are. Really terrific music in the vein of "The Prize", great stuff!

Track List
Instruments/Musicians
Click on each musician name for more credits
For more specific musician lists for the scores on this album, go here:
Cain's Hundred: Crime and Commitment
Cain's Hundred: Degree of Guilt
Cain's Hundred: Rules of Evidence

Leader (Conductor):
Jerry (Jerrald) Goldsmith

Violin:
Israel Baker, Robert Barene, Herman Clebanoff, Elliot Fisher, Sam Freed, Jr., Anatol Kaminsky, Nathan Kaproff, Bernard Kundell, William Kurasch, Marvin Limonick, Alfred Lustgarten, Joy Lyle (Sharp), Lisa Minghetti, Alexander Murray, Erno Neufeld, Lou Raderman, Sally Raderman (aka Sarah Kreindler), Ralph Schaeffer, Sidney Sharp, Heimann Weinstine

Viola:
Cecil Figelski, Allan Harshman, Virginia Majewski, Reuben Marcus

Cello:
Justin DiTullio, Ossip Giskin, Armand Kaproff, Raphael "Ray" Kramer, George Neikrug

Bass:
George F. Boujie, Mario Camposano, Keith "Red" Mitchell, Robert King Stone

Clarinet:
Gus Bivona, Hugo Raimondi

French Horn:
John W. "Jack" Cave, Willard Culley, Vincent DeRubertis, Herman Lebow, Arthur Maebe, Jr., Charles Peel, Jr.

Trumpet:
Raymond Linn

Trombone:
Albert C. Anderson, Randall Miller, Richard Noel, Herb Taylor

Tuba:
George F. Boujie

Piano:
Sam Furman

Banjo:
Allen Reuss

Accordion:
Frank Marocco

Drums:
Frankie Capp, Frank J. Flynn, Ralph Hansell, Sheldon "Shelly" Manne

© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.