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Prophecy (1979)
Music by Leonard Rosenman
Prophecy Prophecy
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $19.95
Limited #: 3000
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Silver Age
CD Release: February 2010
Catalog #: Vol. 13, No. 1
# of Discs: 1

One of the most-requested scores from the Paramount Pictures vaults comes to CD in complete form: Prophecy, Leonard Rosenman’s action-oriented horror score from the 1979 John Frankheimer ecologically minded monster movie.

Prophecy was a large-scale attempt to bring the monster genre up-to-date with modern special effects, giving a first-rate filmmaker the tools do so. The story concerns mercury poisoning that is mutating wildlife in a remote area of Maine—resulting in a marauding bear that somewhat resembles a giant baby, a pepperoni pizza and a herpe. Robert Foxworth stars as an EPA agent assigned to investigate, with Talia Shire his pregnant wife; Armand Assante plays a local Native American and Richard Dysart a representative of the polluting paper mill.

While Prophecy was financially successful, its earnest combination of serious ecological themes and outrageous monster action has made it more of a cult classic than anything else. One of the film’s finest attributes is its honking good symphonic score by Leonard Rosenman, who had recently scored the 1978 animated version of The Lord of the Rings.

The fiercely modern and individual Rosenman possessed an adventuresome symphonic style (and breathtaking technique) which was well-suited for sci-fi and fantasy films such as Fantastic Voyage, two of the Planet of the Apes sequels and supernatural thrillers like Race With the Devil and The Car. In Prophecy, his pulse-pounding score combines pastoral, expansive moments (for the gorgeous Maine scenery), intimate human-interest scoring, chilling suspense and (last but not least) throbbing, over-the-top monster action, embellished by the spine-chilling twangs of Craig Huxley’s electronic blaster beam.

Over three decades after its creation, Rosenman’s complete score to Prophecy comes to CD in complete form from first-generation stereo mixes made at the time of the recording. Liner notes are by Scott Bettencourt and Alexander Kaplan.

Leonard Rosenman Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Leonard Rosenman (1924-2008) was an accomplished 20th century American composer with a major career in film and television. He was an up-and-coming New York concert composer when his friendship with James Dean lead to his groundbreaking 1955 scores for East of Eden and Rebel Without a Cause; his score for The Cobweb that same year is acknowledged as the first to be based on twelve-tone music. His other film projects include Fantastic Voyage, the 1978 Lord of the Rings, Cross Creek and Star Trek IV; his television work includes Combat, Marcus Welby, M.D. and Sybil. Rosenman made no apologies for his modernist style and was outspoken about using his film projects as testing grounds for concert works. IMDB

Comments (113):Log in or register to post your own comments
http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/13434/PROPHECY/

Ba-ZING!



Yes!!!!


Wow, they just keep coming.

Terrific! Love Rosenman in this mode. Listen to that blaster beam in "Blub Blub"! awesome....

"What is that ...a pig-bear man?"

hmm... it's only beginning of February and 2010 has already seen so many terrific releases :)

You are spoiling us :))

Anyway, can't wait to finally hear this in proper quality. There never can be enough Rosenman's music available. :)

"The story concerns mercury poisoning that is mutating wildlife in a remote area of Maine—resulting in a marauding bear that somewhat resembles a giant baby, a pepperoni pizza and a herpe."

On nooooooo! I mean oh yesssss! But ohhh noooooooo as in just purchased Black Sunday, and Players... and now THIS!

What a week! Talk about being spoiled this year and it's only February! THANK YOU to everyone concerned! Going to have to be strict about ordering this and wait a month - killer :( Fingers crossed will still be some left by then! Never heard the score, or seen the film for that matter, but I adore the Lord of the Rings Score and imagine this is similar?

Hopefully we'll see expanded versions of Robo2 and Star Trek IV in due course - two scores I really cannot get enough of.

Off to listen to the clips :)

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zLb9UtQhy8[/youtube]

Now THIS is the Rosenman I love: brash, experimental, colorful and unapologetically atonal! Any score with a blaster beam is OK in my book.

Yep, using my entire year's budget for CDs in the first month or so. Outstanding!

Ordered!

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Track List
Instruments/Musicians
Click on each musician name for more credits

Leader (Conductor):
Leonard Rosenman

Violin:
Israel Baker, Arnold Belnick, Harry Bluestone, Norman Carr, Isabelle Daskoff, Glenn Dicterow, Harold Dicterow, Assa Drori, Ronald P. Folsom, David Frisina, Irving Geller, Harris Goldman, Clayton Haslop, Reginald Hill, William Hymanson, Ezra Kliger, Connie L. Kupka, Norma Leonard, Marvin Limonick, Mary Debra Lundquist, David Montagu, Stanley Plummer, Jay Allen Rosen, Nathan Ross, Sheldon Sanov, Barry Socher, Marshall Sosson, Joseph Stepansky, Robert "Bob" Sushel, Mari Tsumura (Botnick), Harold Wolf

Viola:
James F. Dunham, Pamela Goldsmith, Allan Harshman, Roland Kato, Louis Kievman, Archie Levin, Patricia M. Mathews, Carole S. Mukogawa, Robert Ostrowsky, Sven Reher, Harry Rumpler, Leonard Selic, Barbara A. Simons (Transue), Linn Subotnick, Milton Thomas

Cello:
Delores M. Bing, Ron Cooper, Douglas L. Davis, Selene Depuy-Hurford, Christine Ermacoff, Anne Goodman (Karam), Raymond J. Kelley, Raphael "Ray" Kramer, Ronald A. Leonard, Robert Martin, Nino Rosso, Daniel Rothmuller, Harry L. Shlutz, David H. Speltz

Bass:
Steven Edelman, Jim Hackman, John A. Hornschuch, Ed Meares, Peter A. Mercurio, Buell Neidlinger, Susan A. Ranney, Meyer (Mike) Rubin, Margaret Storer

Flute:
Louise M. DiTullio (Dissman), Lisa R. Edelstein, Susan S. Fries, David J. Shostac, Sheridon W. Stokes, James R. Walker

Oboe:
William Criss, Robert G. Steen, David E. Weiss, Barbara Jo Winters

Clarinet:
Roy A. D'Antonio, Gary G. Gray, John Neufeld, Julian Spear

Bassoon:
Fowler A. Friedlander, Norman H. Herzberg, Jack Marsh

French Horn:
Aubrey J. Bouck, Michael S. Carl, Vincent N. DeRosa, David A. Duke, Robert E. Henderson, Russell B. Kidd, Brian D. A. O'Connor, Richard E. Perissi, Calvin L. Smith, Victor Vener

Trumpet:
Irving R. Bush, Chase E. Craig, Robert Divall, Graham Young

Trombone:
Herbert A. Rankin, George M. Roberts, Lloyd E. Ulyate

Tuba:
Roger Bobo, James M. Self

Piano:
Ralph E. Grierson, Lincoln Mayorga

Keyboards:
Ralph E. Grierson, Craig Huxley (Hundley)

Harp:
Dorothy S. Remsen

Percussion:
Dale L. Anderson, Peter Limonick, Joe Porcaro, Emil Radocchia (Richards), Kenneth E. Watson

Orchestrator:
Ralph Ferraro

Orchestra Manager:
Carl Fortina

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