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Klute/All the President’s Men (1971/1976)
Music by David Shire, Michael Small
Klute/All the President’s Men Klute/All the President’s Men Klute/All the President’s Men
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $19.95
Limited #: 3000
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Silver Age
CD Release: December 2007
Catalog #: Vol. 10, No. 16
# of Discs: 1

Two of the best scores of the 1970s come to CD at last: Klute by Michael Small and All the President's Men by David Shire. Both films were produced by Warner Bros. and directed by Alan J. Pakula—the respective films, and scores, are among the most lauded of the decade.

Klute (1971) starred Jane Fonda (in an Oscar-winning performance) as a New York call girl being terrorized by a sadistic ex-client, with Donald Sutherland as the private detective (the title character) looking for a friend whose disappearance may be related. Part neo-film noir, part sophisticated, adult drama, the film is a fantastic character study as well as a gripping thriller, modern feminist classic and a fascinating journey through the New York City of the sexual revolution.

Klute's score by Michael Small—his first Hollywood assignment—was groundbreaking in its use of an avant garde chamber orchestra (piano, percussion and voice—a creepy female "siren song") compared to symphonic or jazz approaches of the past. Such a style had never been used in a Hollywood thriller and it was an instant hit, leading to Small scoring other '70s classics like The Parallax View and Marathon Man. The score also includes a melancholy "pop" love theme for trumpet and eclectic source cues for the 1970s urban setting.

All the President's Men (1976) was the brilliant film adaptation of the book by Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, chronicling their historic investigation into Watergate and President Nixon. Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman played the reporters in one of the best films about journalism and politics ever made—a crackling true-life mystery with global implications.

In the mid-1970s, no composer was as renowned as David Shire for finding exquisitely subtle musical solutions for demanding and unique films like The Conversation, The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, Farewell, My Lovely and The Hindenburg. When Shire was first screened All the President's Men, he asked if the film needed any music at all, but director Pakula suggested that music could remind audiences of the "human heart" beating in the characters. Shire crafted a brief and understated score that never sacrificed melody or musicality, with a memorable theme speaking of the journalists' resolve to untangle the mystery.

Klute has circulated for many years as a "promotional" or bootleg LP from which numerous unauthorized copies have been made; the original soundtrack to All the President's Men has never been released. This definitive CD features both scores remixed from the 16-track master elements for optimal stereo sound quality. Liner notes are by Kyle Renick.

David Shire Scores on FSM
About the Composer

David Shire (b. 1937) is responsible for some of the most acclaimed scores of the 1970s, such as The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, The Conversation and Farewell, My Lovely. His film and television work extends from the late 1960s to the present day (including 2007's Zodiac), consistently excellent in its subtlety, dramatic sensitivity and musical imagination. He has also, with lyricist partner Richard Maltby, enjoyed a successful career in musical theater. IMDB

Michael Small Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Michael Small (1939-2003) was one of the defining composers of the 1970s, crafting brilliantly creepy and evocative soundscapes for such "paranoia" thrillers such as Klute, The Parallax View and Marathon Man—finding subtle and ingenious ways to update the Hollywood film scoring vocabulary with avant garde and pop techniques. He remained active in the '80s and '90s with scores such as Jaws IV: The Revenge and Mountains of the MoonIMDB

Comments (34):Log in or register to post your own comments
What a great two-fer! It gives me them early-70s-paranoia- minimalist-blues, baby! This stuff is Noir...or maybe just two excellent mysteries.

Less is more.

I initially bought this for KLUTE and while it has made me a Michael Small admirer, it's Shire's effort that has me hooked. Both scores are hushed, spare affairs with surprisingly catchy themes. The underscore perfectly captures the atmosphere of the unravelling mystery. I hope FSM can someday follow this release up with The Parallax View and Marathon Man...

I know they're watching me and the other four people who bought this score. They also know I purchased my copy from Intrada. It was a "third-rate online transaction." ;)

Just follow the money.

I bough this double header for "Klute" that I already knew but FSM enhanced it so brilliantly that it became a brand new experience.
The orchestration is fascinating, just listen closely to Small's use of instrument.
The killer motif ranks as one of the best with Scorpio from "Dirty Harry": I mean the obsessive female voices.
http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/store/MP3/1016/04_Phone_Call_Play_Back.mp3

The first instrument that starts the "Main Title" always remind me Billy Goldenberg's creepy 70's Universal sound.

"Klute" is again a very versalite and composite score that combines many influences and references from chamber music, modernist classical music, traditional Indian music, psyche rock music, funk, jazz ... "Klute" is a concept score.
Two themes (the love, the killer) dominate and are repeated with different arrangements all the way.

KLUTE was my introduction to Michael Small--at least *this* style of him, because his 1980s work didn't make any impact on me. Now, hearing how he has this conspiracy/thriller sound makes him much more interesting.

I love spare, dissonant piano--that "Chamber Music" sound you mention...I've never even seen KLUTE--it probably doesn't get played on TV all that much.

I guess by the usual lack of response, that this was another score that Lukas "had to" do, and I'm grateful he did.

I did buy this CD, but never really fell in love with it.
Klute is my favourite of the two, but it isn't amongst my personal faves of Small.
It's quietly effective, and spooky, but doesn't get too many repeat plays from me.
Shire's score has a great main theme (which I already had on the Shire Film Music Promo CD) but becomes tiresome over the whole CD.
No complaints about it getting released, but I know I would have been happier with Parallax View, Audrey Rose or Postman Always Rings Twice.

I did buy this CD, but never really fell in love with it.
Klute is my favourite of the two, but it isn't amongst my personal faves of Small.
It's quietly effective, and spooky, but doesn't get too many repeat plays from me.
Shire's score has a great main theme (which I already had on the Shire Film Music Promo CD) but becomes tiresome over the whole CD.
[/endquote]

How do you think they work within the films themselves?

A publication with MARATHON MAN and THE PARALLAX VIEW would be an exciting Michael Small situation. Those scores are probably considered gems and awaiting their turn amongst a lot of other material.

A publication with MARATHON MAN and THE PARALLAX VIEW would be an exciting Michael Small situation. Those scores are probably considered gems and awaiting their turn amongst a lot of other material.[/endquote]

Yes, they're quickly entering "Holy Grail" status ( aka "order, anticipate, shelve, and forget" ;)).

If Paranoia was your "bag", Small and Shire were the ones to call. If they made films like that today, who would be the likely composer? Don't answer that, because I'd be afraid to know the awful truth...

I liked KLUTE (and I agree wholeheartedly with Thomas that it does occasionally have that '70's-Billy Goldenberg- [and others]-at-Universal' sort of feeling). I do think that it got a bit repetitive in parts of the CD, but it worked brilliantly in the film and that's what counts.

Much though I admire Mr Shire, outside of some snippets of ALL THE PRESIDENTS MEN, I found it rather a tough listen. The music didn't really 'engage' me, I suppose. Then again, in the movie I don't think that it would have been intended to.

I liked KLUTE (and I agree wholeheartedly with Thomas that it does occasionally have that '70's-Billy Goldenberg- (and others)-at-Universal' sort of feeling). I do think that it got a bit repetitive in parts of the CD, but it worked brilliantly in the film and that's what counts.

Much though I admire Mr Shire, outside of some snippets of ALL THE PRESIDENTS MEN, I found it rather a tough listen. The music didn't really 'engage' me, I suppose. Then again, in the movie I don't think that it would have been intended to.[/endquote]

Then it's no coincidence that this score is "hitting the spot", because I've been watching the first season of COLUMBO all weekend, so I have Billy G. and the like on the brain! I also can say that my taste in film and TV music has leaned heavily towards the abstract, atonal, and dissonant style so popular in the late-sixties/early-seventies. I've enjoyed jazz from that period for decades now, so perhaps I'm overdue in fully immersing myself in music like this.

I'm a bit embarrassed that it took me nearly two years to finally "pull the trigger" on this release, but that's a New York Minute compared to the seven years it took me to purchase, love, and treasure POINT BLANK/THE OUTFIT. I'll miss obsessively putting it in and taking it out of my SAE shopping cart, though! ;)

I really gotta stop living on Mayberry time...

I liked KLUTE (and I agree wholeheartedly with Thomas that it does occasionally have that '70's-Billy Goldenberg- (and others)-at-Universal' sort of feeling). I do think that it got a bit repetitive in parts of the CD, but it worked brilliantly in the film and that's what counts.
[/endquote]


The repetitive aspect is done on purpose because the score, as I wrote above, consisted on two themes (the love, the killer) executed with different arrangements. In the context of the film, it is designed to show the obsessive nature of two characters: the killer in the shadow and the hooker.

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Track List
Instruments/Musicians
Click on each musician name for more credits
For more specific musician lists for the scores on this album, go here:
All The President's Men
Klute

Leader (Conductor):
Michael Melvoin, David L. Shire, Michael Small

Violin:
Israel Baker, Harry Bluestone, Henry Arthur Brown, Tom Buffum, Herman Clebanoff, James Getzoff, Anatol Kaminsky, Nathan Kaproff, Louis Kaufman, Ezra Kliger, William Kurasch, Marvin Limonick, Leonard Malarsky, Erno Neufeld, Wilbert Nuttycombe, Jerome Joseph Reisler, Linda Rose, Nathan Ross, Ralph Schaeffer, Paul C. Shure, Tibor Zelig, Shari Zippert (Freebairn-Smith)

Viola:
Bobby Bruce (aka Robt. Berg), Denyse N. Buffum, Rollice Dale, Joseph DiFiore, Pamela Goldsmith, Allan Harshman, Myra Kestenbaum, Louis Kievman, Yukiko Kurakata (Kamei), Virginia Majewski, Robert Ostrowsky, Jack Pepper, Jerome Joseph Reisler, Barbara A. Simons (Transue), Milton Thomas

Cello:
Joseph DiTullio, Jesse Ehrlich, Glenn E. Grab, Lucille Greco (D'Addio), Armand Kaproff, Raphael "Ray" Kramer, Edgar Lustgarten, Frederick R. Seykora, Harry L. Shlutz, Eleanor Slatkin, Jeffrey G. Solow, David H. Speltz, Gloria Strassner, Mary Louise Zeyen

Bass:
Charles C. Berghofer, Charles L. Domanico, Arni Egilsson, Milton Kestenbaum, Abraham Luboff, Peter A. Mercurio, Meyer (Mike) Rubin

Flute:
Gene Cipriano, Harry Klee

Bassoon:
Norman H. Herzberg, Bob Tricarico

Woodwinds:
Gene Cipriano, Justin Gordon, James R. Horn, Ronald Langinger (aka Ronny Lang), John Lowe, Donald Menza, Ted Nash, John Neufeld, Hugo Raimondi, Thomas W. Scott, C. E. "Bud" Shank

French Horn:
James A. Decker, Vincent N. DeRosa, David A. Duke, Robert E. Henderson, George W. Hyde, Richard E. Perissi, Alan I. Robinson, Gale H. Robinson, Henry Sigismonti

Trumpet:
Conte Candoli, Marion "Buddy" Childers, Charles B. Findley, Maurie Harris, Malcolm Boyd McNab, Edward Allen Sheftel, Thomas M. Stevens, Anthony "Tony" Terran

Trombone:
Milton Bernhart, Hoyt Bohannon, Richard "Dick" Nash, Thomas Shepard

Tuba:
James M. Self, Donald G. Waldrop

Flugelhorn:
Jack Sheldon

Piano:
Larry G. Muhoberac, Jr.

Keyboards:
John D. Berkman, Artie Kane, Clark Spangler

Guitar:
Dennis Budimir, Alvin W. Casey, Neil Levang, Lee M. Ritenour, William "Louie" Shelton, Thomas "Tommy" Tedesco

Fender (electric) Bass:
Max R. Bennett

Harp:
Verlye Brilhart-Mills, Catherine Gotthoffer (Johnk)

Drums:
John P. Guerin

Percussion:
Dale L. Anderson, Larry Bunker, Gary L. Coleman, Anthony Columbia, Victor Feldman, Jules Greenberg, Emil Radocchia (Richards)

Arranger:
David L. Shire

Orchestra Manager:
Kurt E. Wolff

Copyist:
Dan Franklin, Joel Franklin (Guzy), Arthur W. Grier, Bill Williams (aka George Davenport)

© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.