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The Getaway: The Unused Score (1972)
Music by Jerry Fielding
The Getaway: The Unused Score The Getaway: The Unused Score
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $24.95
Limited #: 3000
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Silver Age
CD Release: November 2005
Catalog #: Vol. 8, No. 18
# of Discs: 2

Sam Peckinpah and Jerry Fielding formed one of the most potent director/composer collaborations in cinema history, creating lasting works in The Wild Bunch (1969), Straw Dogs (1971) and Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974). One of their efforts together, sadly, was not to be: The Getaway (1972), for which Fielding's score was replaced by an equally fine yet different one by Quincy Jones.

For years Fielding's score was known only by reputation; associate producer Gordon Dawson said it was "like a man in a green suit walking in a forest." Portions were included on a private Jerry Fielding compilation in 1992; finally, this CD features the premiere authorized release of the complete score in excellent stereo sound.

The Getaway starred Steve McQueen and Ali Macgraw as a husband-and-wife criminal team attempting to save not only their lives and their loot but their marriage. Fielding provided the requisite action and thriller strains, but keyed onto the couple's fraying relationship with gentle, melancholy colors and a sophisticated, "feathery" approach.

As a special bonus, this CD package includes a bonus promotional item not for sale separately: a DVD of the half-hour documentary, Main Title 1M1: Jerry Fielding, Sam Peckinpah and The Getaway, a highly personal reminiscence by three of the women in Jerry Fielding's life: his wife Camille, daughter Elizabeth, and Peckinpah confidante Katy Haber.

(Please note: This is an ALL REGION NTSC DVD, which means it will play on an ALL REGION DVD player.)

Liner notes by Peckinpah authority Nick Redman—who produced this album and directed the documentary film—provide a wealth of historical detail, and exact timings for relating the music to the motion picture. This is a must-have package for fans of Peckinpah, Fielding, and '70s cinema.

Jerry Fielding Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Jerry Fielding (1922-1980) was one of cinema's most distinctive voices in the 1960s and especially '70s, the perfect musical complement to the films of Sam Peckinpah, Michael Winner, Clint Eastwood and others. His scores are marked by modernism and intricate orchestrations but also a poetic beauty and intensity—an appropriate accompaniment to the decade's strange and often sad (but never sentimental) criminals and antiheroes, be they in westerns (The Wild Bunch) or crime films. He was, however, capable of numerous styles (he was a former Vegas bandleader), and wrote a great number of scores (from sticoms to dramas to sci-fi) for television. IMDB

Comments (39):Log in or register to post your own comments
Four years later and I finally have--and love--this score.

I'm really enjoying this score--another one reminscent of THE MECHANIC--and "The Bank Robbery" is one of Fielding's best action/suspense cues ever, but I wonder why there's that "tacet" 2:38-3:45 into the cue? Why exactly was this done?

As for the score, I agree with the sentiment that Fielding's THE GETAWAY would make a good first score for the Fielding newbie. It has all the trademarks of the man's work: the percussion, the tapped, churning string effects, and the melodic, rural cues. Was Fielding a country music fan?

The DVD documentary was warm, funny, and touching. I liked how Jerry was "down in the basement", always working, and that the itinerant Peckinpah practically lived at the Fielding household. Camille is a classy lady and I enjoyed hearing her reminscences. Redman and Co. have produced a warm, entertaining look at Fielding's private life. Clearly a labor of love.

Jerry Fielding has become my hero--any man who bucks the odds and succeeds with his artistic integrity intact has to be.

This score rekindled a dormant love I must have had for Fielding's music too.
I only owned his Outlaw Josey Wales LP up to that point.
A friend was given this CD to review for MFTM, but it never appealed to him, so he passed it onto me. I loved the music, really enjoyed the Redman documentary, and set about snaffling up as much of his music as I could. Super Cops is fantastic, I absolutely love that score.
He's been like a breath of fresh air these past few years, with his cool, unique sound.
It was great catching up with his old scores, at a time when I was growing really bored with most of the film music being written these days.

NP - My Sister's Keeper (Zigman) - very nice music.

"The Bank Robbery" is one of Fielding's best action/suspense cues ever, but I wonder why there's that "tacet" 2:38-3:45 into the cue? Why exactly was this done?[/endquote]

If I'm correct Nick Redman helps us reconstruct the FINAL version of the score in his liner notes, what we would have heard in the final print if it hadn’t been rejected.
The “tacet” would have been dropped if I’m correct but just put on the Cd so we can hear what Jerry Fielding originally wrote for this scene. It’s a kind of “unused cue” in an unused score I think :-)

The DVD is really great (unfortunately too short) and gives a good picture what happened in post-production. Hopefully someday Nick Redman will make a good documentary about Jerry Fielding like Fred Karlin did on Jerry Goldsmith. Pretty sure Lennie Niehaus or Richard Lewzey have some interesting stuff to say.

"The Bank Robbery" is one of Fielding's best action/suspense cues ever, but I wonder why there's that "tacet" 2:38-3:45 into the cue? Why exactly was this done?[/endquote]

If I'm correct Nick Redman helps us reconstruct the FINAL version of the score in his liner notes, what we would have heard in the final print if it hadn’t been rejected.
The “tacet” would have been dropped if I’m correct but just put on the Cd so we can hear what Jerry Fielding originally wrote for this scene. It’s a kind of “unused cue” in an unused score I think :-)
[/endquote]

So it was purposely given that "phoned in" sound? Couldn't they have just let the annotation inform us--it does so in the booklet-- as to what was rejected within the rejected score? Maybe that was the best-sounding source they had. Just wondering how all this works. I'd never heard of a tacet before this.

Leave it to Jerry to compose a cue called "Texas Trash Heap" and make it sound transcendentally beautiful!

I've just listened to this CD again. It is unbelievable how good and masterly Fielding's scoring was. I love the piece for the End Titles. Upbeat, bittersweet, soulful, and melancholic at the same time.
One of the greatest and best productions by Lukas and Mr. Redman ever!

I was intrigued by the Fielding interview excerpt after the end titles (wish it had been made a separate track). He criticizes industry people who cooperated with the HUAC, saying it was unforgivable. I wonder if he was talking about David Raksin?

I'm listening to it now. Great. As always. I hope the day comes when we can see the movie matched with Fielding's score, it's a favorite movie of mine.

I hope the day comes when we can see the movie matched with Fielding's score[/endquote]

Too bad that Redman's DVD project had to be cancelled!

I'm listening to it now. Great. As always. I hope the day comes when we can see the movie matched with Fielding's score, it's a favorite movie of mine.[/endquote]

The Blu-Ray advertises that it contains Fielding's music on an isolated score track. Here's a review:

http://bluray.highdefdigest.com/673/getaway1972.html

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Track List
Instruments/Musicians
Click on each musician name for more credits

Leader (Conductor):
Jerry Fielding

Violin:
Glenn Dicterow, David Frisina, Claire Hodgkins, George Kast, Marvin Limonick, Joy Lyle (Sharp), Alexander Murray, Irma W. Neumann, Stanley Plummer, Ralph Schaeffer, Marshall Sosson, Joseph Stepansky, Gerald Vinci, Dorothy M. Wade (Sushel)

Viola:
Myer Bello, Allan Harshman, Myra Kestenbaum, Alex Neiman, David Schwartz

Cello:
Douglas L. Davis, Marie Fera, Raphael "Ray" Kramer, Edgar Lustgarten, Jeffrey G. Solow

Bass:
Milton Kestenbaum, Peter A. Mercurio, Joseph Mondragon

Flute:
Ronald Langinger (aka Ronny Lang), Sheridon W. Stokes

Oboe:
Gene Cipriano

Clarinet:
Dominick Fera

Bassoon:
Norman H. Herzberg

French Horn:
Vincent N. DeRosa, Henry Sigismonti

Trumpet:
John Audino, Carroll "Cappy" Lewis, James Salko

Trombone:
Francis L. "Joe" Howard, Richard "Dick" Nash, George M. Roberts, William Schaefer, Lloyd E. Ulyate

Keyboards:
Artie Kane, Clark Spangler

Guitar:
Alton R. "Al" Hendrickson, Orville Rhodes, Thomas "Tommy" Tedesco

Harp:
Anne Stockton (Mason)

Harmonica:
Tommy Morgan

Percussion:
Dale L. Anderson, Larry Bunker, Joe Porcaro, Kenneth E. Watson

Arranger:
Greig McRitchie, Leonard "Lennie" Niehaus

Orchestra Manager:
Carl Fortina

Copyist:
Bruce Broughton, William Broughton, Howard W. Drew, Janet Guy, Edward E. Ocnoff, Forrest Zimmerman

© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.